Location: Hinds County MS

Slave Narrative of John Cameron

Person Interviewed: John Cameron Location: Jackson, Mississippi Date of Birth: 1842 John Cameron, ex-slave, lives in Jackson. He was born in 1842 and was owned by Howell Magee. He is five feet six inches tall, and weighs about 150 pounds. His general coloring is blackish-brown with white kinky hair. He is in fairly good health. “I’se always lived right here in Hinds County. I’s seen Jackson grow from de groun’ up. “My old Marster was de bes’ man in de worl’. I jus’ wish I could tell, an’ make it plain, jus’ how good him an’ old Mistis was. Marster was a rich man. He owned ’bout a thousand an’ five hund’ed acres o’ lan’ an’ roun’ a hund’ed slaves. Marster’s big two-story white house wid lightning rods standin’ all ’bout on de roof set on top of a hill. “De slave cabins, ‘cross a valley from de Big House, was built in rows. Us was ‘lowed to sing, play de fiddles, an’ have a good time. Us had plenty t’ eat and warm clo’es an’ shoes in de winter time. De cabins was kep’ in good shape. Us aint never min’ workin’ for old Marster, cause us got good returns. Dat meant good livin’ an’ bein’ took care of right. Marster always fed his slaves in de Big House. “De slaves would go early to de fiel’s an...

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Slave Narrative of Mollie Williams

Person Interviewed: Mollie Williams Location: Terry, Mississippi Age: 83 Mollie Williams, who lives two miles west of Terry, Miss., tells her story: “Iffen I lives’ til nex’ September 15, I’ll be eighty fo’! I was born ’bout three miles frum Utica on de Newsome place. Me an’ brudder Hamp b’longed to Marse George Newsome. Marse George was named afte’ George Washington up in Virginny whar he come frum. Miss Margurite was our mistiss. My mammy? Well, I’ll have to tell you now ’bout her. “You see, Marse George come off down here frum Virginny lak young folks venturin’ ’bout, an’ mar’ied Mis’ Margurite an’ wanted to start up livin’ right over thar near Utica whar I was born. But Marse George was po’, an’ he sho’ foun’ out ye can’t make no crop wid’out’n a start of darkies, so he writ home to Virginny fer to git some darkies. All dey sont him was fo’ mens an’ old Aunt Harriet fer to cook. “One day Marse George an’ his Uncle, Mr. John Davenport—now thar was a rich man fer ye, why, he had two carri’ge drivers—dey rid over to Grand Gulf whar dey was a sellin’ slabes offen de block an’ Mr. John tol’ Marse George to pick hisself out a pair of darkies to mate so’s he could git hisself a start of darkies fer to chop his...

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Biographical Sketch of George Albert Pierson

George Albert Pierson, who in 1912 established the George Pierson Studio at Muskogee, where he has since conducted business on his own account, previous experience, however, having well qualified him for the management and development of his studio, was born in Raymond, Mississippi, on the 3d of May, 1883, and is a son of Albert and Belle (White) Pierson. His youthful days were devoted to the acquirement of an education in public and private schools, and later he became a student in the Chicago Art Institute, which maintains the largest art school in the country. He also studied at Smith’s Academy for a period of three years. In June, 1906, he came to Muskogee and for six years thereafter was associated with his father, who was the proprietor of Pierson Studio. In 1912 he established the George Pierson Studio, which he has since conducted. His work is of the highest standard, and he has secured a liberal patronage as the years have passed by. Mr. Pierson was united in marriage to Miss Alice Amber Flamm on the 8th of December, 1913, and they have become the parents of a daughter, Mary Alice. They are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and take a deep and helpful interest in its work. Mr. Pierson is also a Mason and has attained the Knights Templar degree in the Commandery, and is...

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The Farm School

But teaching the trades is but part of the system of industrial education at Tougaloo. Each boy is required to work at least one hour a day on the university farm. For all work over that hour the student receives pay, the highest allowance being 7c. an hour. The farm is not run to make money, but to educate. The idea is to make the operation of the farm an object lesson to the students in the better methods of agriculture and stock raising. Several students, enough to take care of the steady and continuous farm work, are employed all day on the farm and attend the night school, but the bulk of the farm labor comes from the students, who give from one to several hours to it outside of school. Last year the farm was run with but one man outside of the student help. The boys, while getting their book learning, tilled eighty-five acres of corn, fifteen acres of oats, with a second crop of peas, seventeen acres of cotton, eight acres of peas, three acres of sorghum, two acres of garden and five acres of berries and orchard. The stock cared for included 100 head of blooded cattle, forty sheep and forty swine. The farm furnished the boarding department 14,000 pounds of beef and pork, 84,476 pounds of milk, and other products in proportion. The...

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