Location: Henry County TN

Letter from Thomas Love to his Nephew, James Robert Love

Letter from Thomas Love to his Nephew, James Robert Love, of Haywood County, North Carolina. Henry County, Paris, Tennessee. My Dear Nephew: 10 March 1843 I received your kind letter of the 23rd, Jan. 1843, which gave me much satisfaction to learn that my old and much beloved brother was still in the land of the living, and all friends in that County generally enjoying health. My family at present is in the enjoyment of reasonable health ever since you left me with the exception, of myself and Albert, who has not altogether recovered his health, but so much so that he attends to all his business. As to myself, I have been sorely afflicted with the Rheumatism pains in my neck for the last sixteen months, but for the last two or three weeks, I think, I have mended considerably, and if it should be the will of the Giver of all Good to continue His kind mercies towards me, and should my neck continue to improve, as it has done for the last two or three weeks, my intention is that, I think, sometime by the month of May, I will be able to ride in a carriage. My intention is at that time, or thereabouts, to set out for my old native country to see all my friends and relatives one more time. My son, Thomas...

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Slave Narrative of Alex & Elizabeth Smith

Interviewer: Henrietta Karwowski Person Interviewed: Mr. and Mrs. Alex Smith Location: South Bend, Indiana Age: 83 Place of Residence: 127 North Lake Street, South Bend, Indiana Henrietta Karwowski, Field Worker Federal Writers’ Project St. Joseph County-District #1 South Bend, Indiana EX-SLAVES MR. AND MRS. ALEX SMITH 127 North Lake Street South Bend, Indiana Mr. and Mrs. Alex Smith, an eighty-three year old negro couple were slaves in Kentucky near Paris, Tennessee, as children. They now reside at 127 North Lake Street, on the western limits of South Bend. This couple lives in a little shack patched up with tar paper, tin, and wood. Mrs. Elizabeth Smith, the talkative member or the family is a small woman, very wrinkled, with a stocking cap pulled over her gray hair. She wore a dress made of three different print materials; sleeves of one kind, collar of another and body of a third. Her front teeth were discolored, brown stubs, which suggested that she chews tobacco. Mr. Alex Smith, the husband is tall, though probably he was a well built man at one time. He gets around by means of a cane. Mrs. Smith said that he is not at all well, and he was in the hospital for six weeks last winter. The wife, Elizabeth or Betty, as her husband calls her, was a slave on the Peter Stubblefield plantation in Kentucky,...

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Slave Narrative of Adeline R. Lennox

Interviewer: Albert Strope Person Interviewed: Adeline Rose Lennox Location: Elkhart, Indiana Place of Birth: Middle / Paris, Tennessee Date of Birth: October 25, 1849 Place of Residence: 1400 South Sixth Street, Elkhart, Indiana Albert Strope, Field Worker Federal Writers’ Project St. Joseph County-District #1 Mishawaka, Indiana ADELINE ROSE LENNOX-EX-SLAVE 1400 South Sixth Street, Elkhart, Indiana Adeline Rose Lennox was born of slave parents at Middle-sometimes known as Paris-Tennessee, October 25, 1849. She lived with her parents in slave quarters on the plantation of a Mr. Rose for whom her parents worked. These quarters were log houses, a distance from the master’s mansion. At the age of seven years, Adeline was taken from her parents to work at the home of a son of Mr. Rose who had recently been married. She remembers well being taken away, for she said she cried, but her new mistress said she was going to have a new home so she had to go with her. At the age of fourteen years she did the work of a man in the field, driving a team, plowing, harrowing and seeding. “We all thought a great deal of Mr. Rose,” said Mrs. Lennox, “for he was good to us.” She said that they were well fed, having plenty of corn, peas, beans, and pork to eat, more pork then than now. As Adeline Rose, the subject...

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Biography of Judge Matthew Chapman

JUDGE MATTHEW CHAPMAN. A man’s life-work is the measure of his success, and he is truly the most successful man who, turning his powers into the channel of an honorable purpose, accomplishes the object of his endeavor. He who weds himself to a great principle lays the foundation of a successful life. In the study of every man’s life we find some mainspring of action-something that he lives for. In Judge Matthew Chapman it seems to have been an ambition to make the best use of his native and acquired powers, and to develop in himself a true manhood. In all the walks of public life he served his county with zealous fidelity, and expects to pass his declining days with those among whom he has grown gray in honorable usefulness. The Judge was born in Henry County, Tennessee, March 7, 1822, to the union of Benjamin and Mary (Cavett) Chapman, natives of Tennessee. In 1830 the parents came to Missouri, and although they first settled in St. Louis, they remained there but a short time, and 1831 found them located near Ozark, Christian County. There they passed the remainder of their days, the mother dying in 1870 and the father two years later, when seventy-two years of age. The father was a successful farmer and stockraiser and was a well known and influential man in his day, serving...

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Finley, Lula Ann – Obituary

Enterprise, Wallowa County, Oregon Lula Ann Finley Services Held Memorial services were conducted by the Bollman Funeral Home Monday at 1 p.m. at the Wallowa Christian Church for Mrs. Lula Ann Finley who passed away Saturday, May 7, 1966 at Wallowa Memorial hospital. The Rev. Orville Mick officiated and Mrs. Nyoda Scott was organist and soloist, singing “Beyond The Sunset” and “Beautiful Isle Of Somewhere”. Honorary pallbearers were Hilbert Murrill, W. A. Richman, J. W. Rounsavell, Marion McCrae, Wm. Collins, Russell Temple, Bernard Livingood, Frank Renfrow. Casket bearers were Joe Wise, Melvin and Don Scott, Jay Rugg, Fred J. Zielke, and Pat Rankin. Graveside services and interment was at 4 .m. in the IOOF cemetery at Milton Freewater where her husband had been buried. Mrs. Finley was the daughter of Daniel and Mary Wynn and was born May 28, 1876 in Henry County, Tenn. On March 29, 1893 she was married at Murray, Ky., to Henry L. Finley and the couple lived in Kentucky until coming to Wallowa County in 1910. In 1942 they moved to Milton-Freewater to live until his death on March 14, 1955. Since then she had lived in Wallowa County. She was a member of the Christian church. She had been in failing health for the past year. Survivors include three daughters; Mrs. Hesrchel (Lillie) Scott, of Wallowa, Mrs. Ercell (Mary) Richman, of Troy, and...

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Biography of Basil Tonion Barber

Basil Tonion Barber. The ever-changing conditions of present-day competition in business life offer splendid opportunities for men of foresight and sagacity in any growing locality, whether it be developing from wilderness to settlement or from hamlet to metropolis. The ability to recognize in advance the strategic commercial situation is an asset the value of which may not be overestimated, and the man who possesses this quality is bound to find himself, sooner or later, in a position of importance in the business world. It was through the ability to predict where business would develop and to know in advance what kind of business would flourish that had enabled Basil Tonion Barber, of Iola, to reach a position of eminence at an age when most men are just starting upon their careers. When he located at Iola, in 1910, he was still a youth, with only several years’ experience behind him, but he confidently embarked upon his career, and today finds himself at the head of a paying automobile and garage business and proprietor of the largest establishment in the city. Basil T. Barber was born at Sunnyside, a small community of Tennessee, May 27, 1885, and is a son of W. L. and Emily (Condra) Barber. He is descended from Irish ancestors who came to the United States during the colonial period and settled as pioneers in Kentucky, where...

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Henry County, Tennessee Cemetery Transcriptions

Tennessee Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Tennessee county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Following Cemeteries (hosted at Henry County, Tennessee Tombstone Transcription Project) Alexander Cemetery Allen Cemetery (#1) Allen Cemetery (#2) Allen Cemetery (#3) aka Kendall/Wynns Cemetery Allen Cemetery (#4) aka Kendall Cemetery Allman/Almond Cemetery Antioch Cemetery (#1) Antioch Cemetery (#2) Atkins Cemetery Baker Cemetery Barbee Cemetery Bass Cemetery Beaver Dam Cemetery Beaver Dam Cemetery Bethany Cemetery Bethel Cemetery Bethesda Cemetery Bethlehem Cemetery Bevil Cemetery Bird’s Creek Cemetery aka Byrd’s Creek Cemetery Blake Cemetery Blanchett Cemetery Bomar Cemetery Bond Cemetery Boothe Cemetery (#1) Boothe Cemetery (#2) Boothe Cemetery (#3) aka Dortch Cemetery Bowden Cemetery Bradford Cemetery (#1) Bradford Cemetery (#2) Bradford Cemetery (#3) Bradley Cemetery (#1) Bradley Cemetery (#2) aka Carson Cemetery Bradshaw Cemetery Brannon Cemetery Breedlove Cemetery aka Henry Cemetery Brent Cemetery Brizendine Cemetery Brogdon Cemetery Brooks Cemetery Buchanan Cemetery aka Burton Cemetery Bucy Cemetery (#1) Bucy Cemetery (#2) Burke Cemetery Burton Cemetery aka Buchanan Cemetery Byars Cemetery Byrd’s Creek Cemetery aka Bird’s Creek Cemetery Caldwell Cemetery (#1) Caldwell Cemetery (#2) Caldwell Cemetery (#3) Caledonia Cemetery Campbell Cemetery (#1) Campbell Cemetery (#2) Carson Cemetery (#1) Carson Cemetery (#2) Carter Cemetery (#1) Carter Cemetery (#2) Carter Cemetery (#3) Cate Cemetery Cavitt...

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Biography of N. A. Eberman

N.A. EBERMAN. – This still vigorous and erect gentleman of sixty-eight years is a perfect representative of the daring, athletic and pioneer Western men who crossed the plains nearly half a century ago. He was born in Henry county, Tennessee, in 1821, and at the age of ten went with his parents to settle in Madison county, Illinois. In Warren county of the same state he saw something of the Black Hawk war. In 1840 he left home for Missouri, stopping in that then unsettled region until, in 1843, the eloquence of Burnett and the exertions of others resulted in forming the company to cross the plains to Oregon. Joining himself to this body, young Eberman rode on the plains, shooting deer, antelope, elk and buffalo for the company, meeting many adventures and being in the midst of wild Indians. Being strong and daring and a good swimmer, he was of great service in crossing streams and setting the guide lines for the fording of the train. He was quite promiscuous, acting principally as hunter and scout, and after a time, with Burnett’s division, joined himself to Applegate. Being acquainted with Hunt, who was bringing out a sawmill, he went down with that gentleman, after his arrival in Oregon, to the site chosen on the south side of the Columbia river opposite Cathlamet, and worked in the mill. The...

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Biography of Thaddeus Constantine Frazier, M. D.

Thaddeus Constantine Frazier, M. D. A useful life crowded with activity and crowned with achievement both as a physician and as a citizen, Dr. Thaddeus C. Frazier, of Coffeyville, may still further be considered because he is the pioneer medical man of this city. For forty-two years he has been a physician and surgeon here and additionally has been a leader in all forward movements, accepting public positions as a helpful means of progress for the city, encouraging educational movements and through his stability of character conferring honor upon this whole section. Doctor Frazier was born in Henry County, Tennessee, December 14, 1841. His parents were William and Judith Ann (Sheb) Frazier. The Fraziers were of Scotch extraction but the founders of the American branch came from the North of Ireland and settled in Virginia and North Carolina in colonial days. The grandfather of Doctor Frazier, Julian Frazier, was born in North Carolina. He removed to Tennessee where he subsequently died leaving a large estate to his children. He had been an influential man in politics and at one time served as a member of the Tennessee Legislature. William Frazier, father of Doctor Frazier, was born in North Carolina, in 1812, and died at Wichita, Kansas, in 1895. He married Judith Ann Sheb, who was born in Henry County, Tennessee, in 1815, and died there in 1845. They were...

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