Location: Henry County IN

Biography of Dr. W. S. Brown

W. S. Brown was born in Preble county, Ohio, September 16, 1824. His parents, Solomon and Lydia Brown, were both natives of New York, and when the subject of this sketch was but an infant they moved to Henry county, Indiana, where he was reared upon a farm and educated in the common schools. In the spring of 1847 he came to Missouri and settled in Harrison county on the 7th of May of the same year. He was appointed and served as the first postmaster at Bethany. While living in Bethany he engaged in mercantile business. In 1848 he came to this county and moved his stock of goods to Cravensville, but in 1851 abandoned the mercantile business and began the practice of medicine, which profession he had been studying for several years, and has made that his principal business since, together with farming. In 1858 he went to Texas, and after a stay there of eighteen months returned to this “county. He was elected justice of the peace in 1860. October 1, 1861, he enlisted in the six month service and was a lieutenant of the company commanded by Captain Bromfield. At the expiration of his time he again enlisted, this time in Company Thirty-third Regiment Enrolled State Militia, and was elected first lieutenant, and soon after was recommended and commissioned by the governor as colonel of...

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Biographical Sketch of Moses Brown, Jr.

Moses Brown, Jr., was born near New Castle, Henry County, Indiana, June 22, 1831, where he lived eight years, when his parents, Joshua and Sarah S. Brown, removed to Missouri and settled on a farm about six miles northeast of Gallatin. Upon this farm both his parents died, his mother in 1856, and his father in 1871. When sixteen years of age, in 1847, he purchased a tract of land and began farming for himself; improving the wild land and erecting a house in which he lived until 1852. In that year he removed to Harrison County, where he entered a tract of government land, remaining there until 1855, when he returned to Daviess county and has since resided here. He engaged in farming and dealing in horses and mules, until 1871, when he removed to Gallatin, where he has since been engaged in the livery business, and also buying and selling horses and mules. Mr. Brown has been thrice married, his first wife being Miss Jane Cline, of this county, to whom he was joined in marriage in 1849. Six children were born of this union; namely, Robert, Samanthe, Sophronia, Fielding, George and Cortes; the latter only, being at home. Mrs. Brown was called to her last long home, by the grim reaper, Death. In 1871 Mrs. Rebecca Nichols became his second wife, and her death he was...

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Biographical Sketch of James A. Walker

About five miles southwest from Ontario is the farm and home of the subject of this article. It is a place of eighty acres well improved, skillfully tilled, has line buildings, good orchards and a vine-yard, and in connection with the care of this estate, Mr. Walter is operating a dairy and manufacturing a good quality of butter, which is readily sold in the markets. In person Mr. Walter is a man of sound principles, stands well among his fellows, possesses good ability, and has made a success of his labor, starting with his bare hands and now has a good property accumulated. He was born in Wayne county, Indiana, on February 14, 1834, being the son of Henry and Lovier (Lee) Walter. He grew up on a farm, received a good education from the common schools, and remained with his parents until 1880, having removed with them to Henry County, Indiana in 1875. When he stepped out for himself, he came by rail to Reno, Nevada, and in the fall of 1881 came across the country with teams from there to Malheur County, locating in Malheur Valley, and doing his first work as a wage earner in this new country. The settlers were few then and the country open and he selected a farm near where Yale stands, but later closed out the farm business and for three...

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Biography of Shepard Keene Linscott

Shepard Keene Linscott. The late Shepard Keene Linscott, who was born March 6, 1887, and died December 11, 1905, represented in the best sense the highest type of American manhood. A farm near Chesterville, Maine, was the place of his nativity and he was the only son of Shepard and Esther (Keene) Linscott. The house in which he was born was built by his grandfather, Samuel Linscott, who was a soldier of the Revolutionary war. When but sixteen years of age, Shepard Keene Linscott left the parental roof and became a pioneer farmer of Henry County, Indiana. Realizing the importance of an education, he became a student at Hamilton College, Clinton, New York, and while there met, and on March 8, 1858, married Myra Simmons. That he might contribute his mite to the preservation of the Union, he became a member of the Ninth Illinois Cavalry and served in Alabama and Mississippi until after peace was declared. It is worthy of note that he was one of the few soldiers of the Civil war who never applied for a pension, although legally entitled to one. From Illinois Mr. Linscott moved to Washington County, Iowa, and there engaged in mercantile pursuits at Dayton, and later at Washington, and still later was identified with the lumber business at Seymour. His wife died in Iowa after bearing him two children: a boy...

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Butler, Horace John – Obituary

Wallowa County, Oregon Horace John Butler was born in Louisville, Henry County, Indiana May 28, 1850, and died at his home near Fruita, Oregon, September 16, 1926, aged 76 years, 3 months and 19 days. For several years Mr. Butler had been suffering from the ills usual to old age. His oldest son was drowned December 5, 1923, after which time he failed rapidly, the shock and grief undoubtedly shortening his life. Born of Quaker parentage he united with that denomination early in life. At the age of 19, he began teaching school, following that occupation for four years. When 21 years of age he left his native home and located at Ozawkie, Kansas, which was then a newly settled country. There he was married in 1881 to Sarah Evaline Keener. Twelve children were born to this union. In 1889 he migrated to Oregon, living in the Prairie Creek country for two years, then moving to the Imnaha River where he resided continuously until the time of his death. He had been an honorary member of the Modern Woodmen of America for many years. From 1908 until 1924 he served as past master at Fruita, Oregon, when failing health compelled him to resign. He was a good citizen, always respected by the community in which he lived. A great reader, he kept himself well posted on the current events...

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Biography of George O. Lines

George O. Lines. The real estate and insurance business established by George O. Lines in 1911 had gone hand in hand with the development of Neodesha during the past five years, and undoubtedly had contributed as largely during this time toward the advantageous disposal of property and the honorable placing of insurance as any concern of the kind in Wilson County. Mr. Lines is one of Neodesha’s foremost and most substantial citizens, and while his name necessarily is associated with one of the early and influential families of the county, his success had been self-attained, and in its usefulness and scope attracts attention to qualities of business integrity, perseverance and ability and high regard for the welfare of the community. He was born on a farm in Wilson County, Kansas, January 3, 1874, and is a son of S. N. and Sarah (Livezey) Lines. The family of which Mr. Lines is a member originated in Ireland, and the first of the name to come to America located in Connecticut prior to the Revolutionary war. Thomas Lines, the great-grandfather of George O. Lines, was born in 1810, in Indiana, and in addition to being a farmer was a minister of the Baptist Church and preached in that faith in Indiana for approximately fifty years. His death occurred in Henry County, Indiana, in 1901, when he had reached the advanced age...

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Biography of Albert Henley

Albert Henley has been a resident of Lawrence for thirty-nine years. In all that time he had been actively and conspicuously identified with the material growth and commercial development of the state. Mr. Henley was a pioneer manufacturer of barbed wire in Kansas. Barbed wire is now accepted as a commonplace product of American industry. Only the old timers recall with what prejudice this wire was introduced into general use and also the crude forms in which it was at first manufactured. Mr. Henley’s early attempts at the manufacture were on a very small scale. He began at Lawrence under the name The Consolidated Barbed Wire Company. From a small beginning this grew to a large institution, supplying its product over practically all the prairie counties of Kansas. His first equipment consisted of four machines, which were brought to Lawrence in a small tin trunk. At first the barbs were made by hand in the old Kimball factory, and from there were carried in a tin bucket to the wire factory at the foot of Massachusetts Street. The bars were put on by hand. Gradually improvements and extensions were made and automatic machinery was introduced, most of it invented by Mr. Henley himself. In the end the factory employed between 100 and 150 hands, and the business was one of the chief industrial assets of Lawrence. There was also...

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Biography of Nathan L. Hollowell

Nathan L. Hollowell is grand keeper of records and seals for the Knights of Pythias of the State of Kansas. He had his offices in the Husted Building at Kansas City, Kansas, and had been a resident of that city for several years. The office is an elective one and for an annual term. Mr. Hollowell became grand keeper May 15, 1910, and had been re-elected every year since then. He had long been prominent in the Knights of Pythias order and became active in the fraternity while living in Indiana. In that state he was a member of the Grand Lodge and came to know some of the foremost members of the order in Indiana. On coming to Kansas he was admitted to the Grand Lodge, and in 1887 was elected to the office of grand master at arms, and in 1888 advanced to grand prelate. In 1889 he became grand vice chancellor and in 1890 grand chancellor. In 1898 he was chosen supreme representative of the Supreme Lodge, and that dignity he enjoyed until 1906. Mr. Hollowell is an old timer of Kansas, and for many years was closely identified with the business and political life of Kingman County. He was born in the small town of New London, Indiana, September 4, 1853, but during infancy his parents removed to Kokomo, Indiana. His people were all Quakers....

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Biography of Clarence W. Winbigler, M. D.

Clarence W. Winbigler, M. D. It was nearly thirty-five years ago that Doctor Winbigler began practice at Harper, Kansas. That county was then well out toward the frontier, and with one other physician of Harper he shared the honors of pioneer practice. In early years Doctor Winbigler practiced when there were no telephones, when there were few good roads, and his work necessitated riding night and day through the bare prairies in all kinds of weather. As a physician and surgeon he ranks among the leaders of his profession in this section of the state. Doctor Winbigler was born at Middletown, Indiana, September 13, 1853. His paternal ancestors came out of Holland and settled in Maryland in colonial times. His father, Elias Winbigler, was born at Frederick, Maryland, in 1816. In young manhood he left that state, moving to Middletown, Indiana, where he married and took up farming. In the spring of 1859 he went to Spring Grove, Illinois, where he continued farming until his death July 6, 1864. He was a leader among the abolitionists of Indiana and Illinois, and a stanch republican. At the time of his death he held the office of postmaster of Spring Grove. Religiously he was a member of the Lutheran Church. The maiden name of his wife was Amanda R. Gordon, who was born in Warren County, Ohio, in 1819, and died...

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