Location: Henderson County KY

Slave Narrative of Adah I. Suggs

Interviewer: Lauana Creel Person Interviewed: Adah Isabelle Suggs Location: Evansville, Indiana Date of Birth: 1862 Stories from Ex-Slaves 5th District Vanderburgh County Lauana Creel 1415 S. Barker Avenue, Evansville, Indiana ESCAPE FROM BONDAGE OF ADAH ISABELLE SUGGS Among the interesting stories connected with former slaves one of the most outstanding ones is the life story of Adah Isabelle Suggs, indeed her escape from slavery planned and executed by her anxious mother, Harriott McClain, bears the earmarks of fiction, but the truth of all related occurences has been established by the aged negro woman and her daughter Mrs. Harriott Holloway, both citizens of Evansville, Indiana. Born in slavery before January the twenty-second, 1862 the child Adah McClain was the property of Colonel Jackson McClain and Louisa, his wife. According to the customary practice of raising slave children, Adah was left at the negro quarters of the McClain plantation, a large estate located in Henderson county, three and one half miles from the village of Henderson, Kentucky. There she was cared for by her mother. She retains many impressions gained in early childhood of the slave quarters; she remembers the slaves singing and dancing together after the day of toil. Their voices were strong and their songs were sweet. “Master was good to his slaves and never beat them” were her words concerning her master. When Adah was not yet five...

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Slave Narrative of Betty Jones

Interviewer: Lauana Creel Person Interviewed: Elizabeth Jones Location: 429 Oak Street, Evansville, Indiana Ex-Slave Stories District No. 5 Vanderburgh County Lauana Creel THE STORY OF BETTY JONES 429 Oak Street, Evansville, Ind. From an Interview with Elizabeth Jones at 429 Oak Street, Evansville, Ind. “Yes Honey, I was a slave, I was born at Henderson, Kentucky and my mother was born there. We belonged to old Mars John Alvis. Our home was on Alvis’s Hill and a long plank walk had been built from the bank of the Ohio river to the Alvis home. We all liked the long plank walk and the big house on top of the hill was a pretty place.” Betty Jones said her master was a rich man and had made his money by raising and selling slaves. She only recalls two house servants were mulatoes. All the other slaves were black as they could be. Betty Alvis lived with her parents in a cabin near her master’s home on the hill. She recalls no unkind treatment. “Our only sorrow was when a crowd of our slave friends would be sold off, then the mothers, brothers, sisters, and friends always cried a lot and we children would grieve to see the grief of our parents.” The mother of Betty was a slave of John Alvis and married a slave of her master. The family...

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Slave Narrative of Anna Smith

Interviewer: Geo. H. Conn Person Interviewed: Anna Smith Location: Ohio Place of Birth: Henderson Kentucky Date of Birth: May 1833 Age: 100+ Place of Residence: 518 Bishop Street Writer Wilbur C. Ammon, Editor C.R. McLean, District Supervisor June 11, 1937 Folklore Summit County, District #5 In a little old rocking chair, sits an old colored “mammy” known to her friends as “Grandma” Smith, spending the remaining days with her grandchildren. Small of stature, tipping the scales at about 100 lbs. but alert to the wishes and cares of her children, this old lady keeps posted on current events from those around her. With no stoop or bent back and with a firm step she helps with the housework and preparing of meals, waiting, when permitted, on others. In odd moments, she like to work at her favorite task of “hooking” rag rugs. Never having worn glasses, her eyesight is the envy of the younger generation. She spends most of the time at home, preferring her rocker and pipe (she has been smoking for more than eighty year) to a back seat in an automobile. When referring to Civil War days, her eyes flash and words flow from her with a fluency equal to that of any youngster. Much of her speech is hard to understand as she reverts to the early idiom and pronunciation of her race. Her head,...

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Slave Narrative of Morris Hillyer

Person Interviewed: Morris Hillyer Location: Alderson, Oklahoma Age: 84 My father was Gabe Hillyer and my mother was Clarisay Hillyer, and our home was in Rose, Georgia. Our owner was Judge Hillyer. He was de last United States senator to Washington, D. C., before de war. My mother died when I was only a few days old and the only mother I ever knew was Judge Hillyer’s wife, Miss Jane. Her nine children were all older than I was and when mother died Miss Jane said mother had raised her children and she would raise here. So she took us into her house and we never lived at de quarters any more. I had two sisters, Sally and Sylvia, and we had a room in de Big House and sister Sally didn’t do nothing else but look after me. I used to stand with my thumb in my mouth and hold to Miss Jane’s apron while she knitted. When Judge Hillyer was elected be sold out his farm and gave his slave a to his children. He owned about twelve or fourteen slaves at this time. He gave me and my sister Sylvia to his son, Dr. Hillyer, and my father to another one of his sons who was studying law. Father stayed with him and took care of him until he graduated. Father learned to be a good...

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Biography of Benjamin F. Beckham

Benjamin F. Beckham, a prominent farmer of Madrid Bend, is the son of Alexander F. and Mary (Watson) Beckham. The father was born in Virginia in 1828, moved when young to Gibson County, Tennessee, and then to Hickman, Kentucky, then to Mills Point. He married Miss Watson in 1848. They had eight children, only three now living. Mrs. Beckham belongs to the Methodist Church. Mr. Beckham was a merchant and farmed also upon an extensive scale. In politics he was a democrat. Mr. Beckham was the victim of one of the greatest outrages ever perpetrated. It was known that he often had large sums of money at his house, and in 1863, while the Federal forces were stationed on Island No. 10, a squad of seventeen Negroes and white soldiers went to his house, ostensibly to secure a colored child belonging to a Negro woman on the island, but in reality to rob Mr. Beckham; and to make sure of getting it, they murdered Mr. Beckham and his aged father and four of his children. Mrs. Beckham and the other three children were away from home and thus escaped the horrible fate of the others. After murdering six of the family, in order to conceal their dastardly work, the fiends sunk their victims in the river. Some eye witnesses of this cruel murder barely escaped with their lives. In...

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Biography of Henry Dixon Green

HENRY DIXON GREEN. The American bar offers the finest opportunities for preferment of any country upon the face of the earth, its members being privileged, if the talent is not wanting, to attain not only the grandest distinction in the profession, but it is the easiest way of approach to the highest official places in the land. What is more, the American bar can show an array of eminent talent, of profound erudition and of judicial ability equal to that of England, France or Germany. The Howell County bar has, during the past half century, been greatly distinguished for the learning and talent of its members, who know no such word as fail when pitted against lawyers of other sections. A very bright and most successful young attorney of the above mentioned county is Henry Dixon Green, who has won victories at the bar that would have reflected credit upon its oldest members. He is one of the best known lawyers of south Missouri, is affable and genial, making friends wherever he goes, and prominent attorneys in his section say he is one of the best trial lawyers in the State. Mr. Green was born in Henderson County, Kentucky, in 1851. His father, H. D. Green, was a captain in the Confederate Army. and died while in service. In 1876 our subject left his native State and went to...

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Biography of Relf Bledsoe

The days of chivalry and knighthood in Europe cannot furnish more interesting or romantic tales than our own western history. Into the wild mountain fastnesses of the unexplored west went brave men, whose courage was often called forth in encounters with hostile savages. The land was rich in all natural resources, in gold and silver, in agricultural and commercial possibilities, and awaited the demands of man to yield up its treasures, but its mountain heights were hard to climb, its forests difficult to penetrate, and the magnificent trees, the dense bushes or the jagged rocks often sheltered the skulking foe, who resented the encroachment of the pale faces upon these “hunting grounds.” The establishment of homes in this beautiful region therefore meant sacrifices, hardships and oft times death, but there were some men, however, brave enough to meet the red man in his own familiar haunts and undertake the task of reclaiming the district for purposes of civilization. The rich mineral stores of this vast region were thus added to the wealth of the nation; its magnificent forests contributed to the lumber industries and its fertile valleys added to the opportunities of the farmer and stock-raiser, and today the northwest is one of the most productive sections of the entire country. That this is so is due to such men as Captain Relf Bledsoe, whose name is inseparably interwoven...

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Biographical Sketch of John Wesley Porter

John Wesley Porter, a successful young practitioner of law in Muskogee, where he has followed his profession through the past three years, was born in Henderson county, Kentucky, on the 1st of December, 1886, his parents being John Wesley and Lucy Jane (Moss) Porter, the former a tobacco merchant. In the acquirement of an education he attended public and private schools and also studied under a private tutor. His professional training was received in the law department of the Washington and Lee University at Lexington, Virginia, from which he was graduated in June, 1909. He first located for practice at Eufaula, Oklahoma, and there remained until 1918, when he came to Muskogee, where he has built up a clientage of gratifying proportions. He belongs to the Muskogee Bar Association and to the Oklahoma State Bar Association. On the 1st of December, 1910, at Henderson, Kentucky, Mr. Porter was united in marriage to Miss Mary Elizabeth Baskett and they have become parents of three sons: John W. (III), Stuart Moss and Robert Baskett. Fraternally Mr. Porter is identified with the Masons, in which he has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite and also belongs to the Mystic Shrine. He is likewise a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. In his leisure hours he enjoys...

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Henderson County, Kentucky Census Records

1790 Henderson County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1790 Henderson County, Kentucky Census Records Hosted at Henderson County, Kentucky KYGenWeb Hosted at Kentucky American History and Genealogy Project 1799 Tax List 1800 Henderson County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Henderson County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Henderson County, Kentucky KYGenWeb Page 325 Page 327 Page 328 Page 329 Page 330 Page 331 Page 332 Page 333 Page 334 Page 335 Page 336 Page 337 Page 338 Page 339 Page 340 Page 341 Page 342 Page 343 Page 344 Page 345 Page 346 Page 347 Page 348 Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Henderson County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1820 Henderson County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Henderson County, Kentucky KYGenWeb Town of Henderson Town of Henderson Town of Henderson Unknown Page Page 05 Page 06 Page 07 Page 08 Page 09 Page 10 Page 10(b) Page 11 Page 11(b) Page 12 Page 13 Page 13(b) Page 14...

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Henderson County, Kentucky Cemetery Records

Henderson County Henderson County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at Henderson County USGenWeb Archives Project Alderson Family Cemetery Plots Cash Creek Cemetery Gish Cemetery Pleasant Valley Cemetery Ridgewood Cemetery Partial Henderson County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at Henderson County, Kentucky KYGenWeb Agnew Family Cemetery Cairo, Kentucky Henderson County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at Hosted at Rose Family Genealogy Smith Mills Cemetery Surnames A-C Surnames D-G Surnames H-K Surnames L-O Surnames P-S Surnames T-Z...

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Hohimer, Roy Dean – Obituary

Baker City, Oregon Roy Dean Hohimer, 79, of Baker City died July 5, 2003, at St. Elizabeth Health Services. At his request, there will be no funeral. Disposition was by cremation. Coles Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Mr. Hohimer was born on Dec. 24, 1923, at Reed, Ky. He was a son of Bud and Alma Hohimer. He was raised and educated at Reed, Ky. He was drafted into the U.S. Army during World War II and served in the European Theater, Italy and North Africa. He received two purple hearts and was decorated with the Silver Star with clusters and the Bronze Star with clusters. After the war, he was discharged and later was recalled to service during the Korean conflict. In 1959, he went to work in Alaska as an ironworker and continued in that profession until his retirement in 1984. In 1950, he married Pat Goodridge. She died in 1977. In 1986, he married Delita Spencer. They moved to Baker City in 1987 where they have resided since. He loved to work, carpentry and help anyone who needed help. Survivors include his wife Delita of Baker City; his children, Donald and Leisa Hohimer of Evansville, Ind., Kathleen and Joel Harmon of Anchorage, Alaska, and Ron Schneider of Baker City; brothers, Robert Hohimer of Reed, Ky., and Joe Hohimer of Henderson, Ky.; sister, Louise Sutherland...

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Biography of General Joseph Lane

GENERAL JOSEPH LANE. – Joseph Lane first saw the light of day in North Carolina, December 14, 1801. He was reared in Henderson county, Kentucky. At the early age of twenty he was married to Miss Polly Hart, soon afterwards settling in Vanderburg county, Indiana, where he followed the humble life of a farmer for twenty-five years. While in the pursuit of this occupation, he was prominent as a leader in all matter of enterprise in the county. He soon drifted into politics, and was chosen to represent the county in the state legislature. He was continued in the same trust as long as he resided in the county. When the Mexican war began, the state senator resigned his seat, and prepared to enter the hostilities, when he was elected colonel of the Second Regiment of Indian Volunteers, and was ordered to report for duty at General Taylor’s headquarters at Brazos, Texas, which was then the seat of war. It was just prior to the battle of Buena Vista that General Lane was actively employed; and he took an active part in the glorious victory achieved by the American troops, commanding the left wing of Taylor’s army. During this engagement he was severely wounded by a bullet in the left shoulder; but, nothing daunted, he remained upon the field at his post of duty, suffering great pain, until the...

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