Location: Heard County GA

Biography of Robert Grostein

Robert Grostein, one of Idaho’s most successful pioneer merchants, has carried on business in Lewiston since 1862 and through the intervening years has borne an unassailable reputation in trade circles, never making an engagement which he has not kept nor contracting an obligation that he has not met. His sagacity and enterprise and moreover his untiring labor have brought to him a handsome competence, and the most envious could not grudge him his success, so honorably has it been acquired. Mr. Grostein is a native of Poland, born in 1835, and is the eldest in the family of four children whose parents were Moses and Bena (Herschell) Grostein. They also were natives of Poland, in which country they were reared and married, the father there remaining until 1838, when he came to the United States. He had been in sympathy with Napoleon, to whom he had rendered active assistance, and for this reason he was obliged to flee from his native land. After spending a year in America he sent for his family, having decided to make his home in the land of the free. He settled first at Mason, Georgia, spending six years there, after which he went to Buffalo, New York, and was engaged in trade there until 1870. In that year he came to Lewiston, Idaho, bringing with, him his good wife, and here they spent...

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Biographical Sketch of Coghan Ransom

Croghan M. Ransom was born in the state of Georgia in the year 1833. In the year 1855 he married Miss Susan Hanson in Heard County, Georgia; and immediately he and his bride left the state of Georgia and came to Texas and stopped in Hopkins County, where Mr. Ransom still lives. Twelve children were born to this marriage, six of whom are living. John, the eldest son married Miss Looney Titsworth, and lives in San Saba County. Martillus married John Tom Jennings. They live in Chickasha, Indian Territory. They have no children are prosperous and well to do. Robert S. married Miss Della Kirby. They live in the county and have no living children. Miss Mank married Frank Waller. They have five children, are citizens of the county, and are doing well. Dick married Miss Lula Baker, daughter of Bill Baker. They have one child and live at Winsboro, in Wood County. Miss Lou married W. L. Scruggs, a farmer, and lives in the county. Mr. Ransom has engaged in agricultural pursuits and followed farming all his life. He is highly respected, so is his family. He suffered a great calamity in the loss of his wife-the mother of his children-in the year 1879. He subsequently married Mrs. Mary Holdridge, with whom he is living at the present time. They have no children. Mr. Ransom has inherited good...

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Coweta Tribe

The Coweta were the second great Muskogee tribe among the Lower Creeks, and they headed the war side as Kasihta headed the peace side. Their honorary title in the confederacy was Kawita ma’ma’yi, “tall Coweta.” Although as a definitely identified tribe they appear later in history and in the migration legends which have been preserved to us the Kasihta are given precedence, the Coweta were and still are commonly accounted the leaders of the Lower Creeks and often of the entire nation. By many early writers all of the Lower Creeks are called Coweta, and the Spaniards and French both speak of the Coweta chief as ”emperor” of the Creeks. An anonymous French writer of the eighteenth century draws the following picture of his power at the time of the Yamasee uprising: The nation of the Caoüita is governed by an emperor, who in 1714 [1715] caused to be killed all the English there were, not only in his nation, but also among the Abeca, Talapouches, Alibamons, and Cheraqui. Not content with that he went to commit depredations as far as the gates of Carolina. The English were excited and wanted to destroy them by making them drag pieces of ordinance loaded with grape-shot, by tying two ropes to the collar of the tube, on each one of which they put sixty savages, whom they killed in the midst of...

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Muskogee Indians

Muskogee. Meaning unknown, but perhaps originally from Shawnee and having reference to swampy ground. To this tribe the name Creeks was ordinarily applied. Also called: Ani’-Gu’sa, by the Cherokee, meaning “Coosa people,” after an ancient and famous town on Coosa River. Ku-û’sha, by the Wyandot. Ochesee, by the Hitchiti. Sko’-ki han-ya, by the Biloxi. Muskogee Connections. The Muskogee language constitutes one division of the Muskhogean tongues proper, that which I call Northern. Muskogee Location. From the earliest times of which we have any record these people seem to have had towns all the way from the Atlantic coast of Georgia and the neighborhood of Savannah River to central Alabama. (See also Florida, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas.) Muskogee Villages It is difficult to separate major divisions of the Muskogee from towns and towns from villages, but there were certainly several distinct Muskogee tribes at a very early period. The following subdivisional classification is perhaps as good as any: Abihka (in St. Clair, Calhoun, and Talladega Counties): Abihka-in-the-west, a late branch of Abihka in the western part of the Creek Nation, Okla. Abihkutci, on Tallassee Hatchee Creek, Talladega County, on the right bank 5 miles from Coosa River. Kan-tcati, on or near Chocolocko, or Choccolocco, Creek and probably not far from the present “Conchardee.” Kayomalgi, possibly settled by Shawnee or Chickasaw, probably near Sylacauga, Talladega County. Lun-ham-ga, location unknown. Talladega,...

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