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Location: Hartford County CT

Biographical Sketch of Horace Smith

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Horace Smith, born in Old Hartford, Conn., immigrated to Williston at the age of twenty-one years, where he married Rachel Phillips. About seventy years ago he came to this town and located upon the farm now owned by his son, Truman B., on road 45. For his second wife Mr. Smith married Nancy Montgomery, by whom he had eleven children. He had three children by his first...

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Biographical Sketch of Peleg Scofield

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Peleg Scofield, born July 14, 1779, came to Elmore, from Hartford, Conn., about the year 1800, and located upon a farm on road 19, now the property of R. B. Goodell. Here he resided until 1844, when he removed to Morristown, where he subsequently died. He reared a family of fourteen children, of whom only one, John G., living on road 18, now resides in the...

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Biographical Sketch of Timothy Thompson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Timothy Thompson came from Simsbury, Conn., in 1803, and cleared the farm now owned by his son, Daniel C. In 1805, he brought his family and continued his residence until his death, in 1837, aged fifty-five years. Seven of his children are now living, two in Cambridge. His wife, Tryphena Barber, survived his death thirty-five years, dying at the age of...

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Biographical Sketch of John Sheldon

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John, son of Isaac (2) Sheldon, was born December 5. 1658. He settled in Northampton, Massachusetts. He removed to Deerfield and conducted a public house. He was one of the first board of selectmen, ensign of the first military company and captain in 1707. and deacon of the church. He built the old Hoyt house, the door of which, cut by tomahawks and bullets, is preserved in Memorial Hall. In the winter of 1705 he was sent by Governor Dudley on a difficult and dangerous mission to Canada to redeem the captives and returned the following spring with five, two of whom were Hannah, wife of his son, and Esther Williams, daughter of the Deerfield minister. The next winter he was sent again and returned with forty-four redeemed captives of the French and Indians, sailing for home. May 30, 1706, and again with fifty-seven on the brigantine “Hope.” Mr. Williams said of him : “He was a good man and a true servant of the church in Deerfield, who twice took his tedious journey in the winter from New England to Canada on these occasions.” He made a third trip in 1707-08, and returned with seven captives, making a total of one hundred and thirteen that he brought back to their old homes, after the horrors...

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Biography of Charles Trumbull Hayden

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Charles Trumbull Hayden, whose name is linked with the early history of Arizona, was born in Windsor, Connecticut, April 4th, 1825. When eighteen years old he taught school in New Jersey, and afterwards near New Albany, Indiana, and in St. Louis, Missouri. In 1848 he loaded a wagon with merchandise, and left Independence, Missouri, for Santa Fe, New Mexico, where he marketed his goods and returned in the fall. He continued in business at Independence for some time, but when the gold excitement began in 1849, he outfitted a train of ox teams, and started over the Santa Fe Trail. He arrived in Santa Fe late in 1849, and met some parties from California, who bought his outfit, consisting of fourteen wagons loaded with supplies, each drawn by six yoke of oxen. He then returned to Missouri to purchase another stock of goods and establish himself in business in Santa Fe. He was a passenger upon the first Overland Stage to Tucson in 1858, to which place he moved his stock of goods from Santa Fe and established himself in business there. He engaged in contracting with the Government for the furnishing of supplies to the soldiers and did a large freighting business to the mines, hauling supplies in, and ore out. He had many freight...

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Biography of Henry N. Clemons

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Henry N. Clemons, cashier of the First National Bank of Killingly, was born in Granby, Conn., son of Allen and Catharine Clemons. He was educated in the district school, the Granby Academy, the Suffield Literary Institution and the Williston Seminary, East Hampton, Mass. He began teaching at sixteen years of age, and taught in Hartland, Granby and Hartford. Conn., and Woonsocket and Central Falls, R. I. He was for a while in the office of the commissioner of the school fund in Hartford, Conn. In 1844 he commenced railroading on the New Haven & Northampton road, with the engineer corps. He served as station agent at Farmington and Collinsville, Conn., and was assistant postmaster at the latter place; then ticket agent of the Providence & Worcester road at Providence. In 1855 he commenced banking, as clerk in the Arcade Bank, at Providence, and in 1856 became teller of the Merchants’ Bank, then the redeeming bank for Rhode Island, in the old Suffolk system. In June, 1864, he was elected cashier of the First National Bank of Killingly, Conn., then just organized, which office he now holds, after more than twenty-five years’ service, a period longer than any other cashier in eastern Connecticut. The capital of the bank is $110,000. With its July dividend, 1889, it had...

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Biography of Hon. John S. Phelps

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The prominence, both State and national, of this most distinguished citizen of Greene county, may well serve as a reason why this sketch is given at greater length than that of other citizens mentioned; however, even this is but the merest outline of a life whose long public service makes up a history which would require a volume in itself, if given in a matter anything like that merited by the distinguished subject. John S. Phelps is the son of Elisha Phelps, and was born in Simsbury, Hartford county, Connecticut, December 22, 1814. The father, Elisha, was a lawyer of great prominence in that State, who served his fellow citizens in the Legislature, in State offices, and three terms in the national Congress. Noah Phelps, father of Elisha and grandfather of John S., was a captain in the Revolution and a most successful scout and spy. He was one of the “committee of safety” that planed the capture of Ticondero. Like his son and grandson, he, too, served the people in legislative and other capacities of public trust. Mr. Phelps was reared in his birthplace, receiving his education in the public schools and in Washington (now Trinity) college at Hartford, completing his course there in 1832. Subsequently, he studied law under his father for three years,...

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