Location: Hartford County CT

Biography of Zerah S. Westbrook

ZERAH S. WESTBROOK HON. Zera S. Westbrook, the present deputy comptroller of the state of New York, has an interesting and instructive history. As a state official he is at this time a temporary resident of Albany, his residence and home being at Amsterdam, N. Y. His career is one which illustrates in a striking manner, the rise, progress and development of a character such as only can be found in a land of free institutions, without the aid of the wealthy, titled, so called nobility. As will be seen in a brief review of his life, he has already exhibited those qualities which belong to true manhood. Born at Montague, Sussex County, N. J., on the 7th of April, 1845, he spent his youthful days on a farm. His father, Severyne L. Westbrook, tilled a farm at that place. Zerah was a bright, delicate child and the delight of his parents. But he had scarcely reached the age of four years before the grave closed over his father, a useful and respected citizen; and his mother was called upon to make renewed struggles in his behalf during the opening years of his life. His mother was Susan E., daughter of James B. Armstrong of Montague, one of the prominent citizens of Sussex County. She was an intelligent and very pious woman, and died on November 22, 1889, in...

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Biography of Harry Joseph Jeffway

Few men engaged in the electrical construction and contracting business in this part of the State have been trained in so practical and, indeed, in so high grade a school of experience in electrical work as Harry Joseph Jeffway, who not only has an established repute for unrivalled excellence in his Easthampton business, but who throughout the World War was on duty at submarine bases of the greatest responsibility as an electrician, afterwards also continuing in related lines for the United States Government in the shipyards. Mr. Jeffway is an expert in all matters electrical; he has built up an extensive business in company with his brother, William Edward Jeffway, a sketch of whom precedes this, and his popularity combines with his professional ability to secure his success. His ancestors came from France to America during the Colonial era; and the family name is an irreproachable one in matters of good citizenship and industry. Adolphus Jeffway, a sketch of whose life appears in the biography of William Edward Jeffway, was the father of Harry Joseph Jeffway, the subject of this review. Harry Joseph Jeffway was born August 19, 1895, in Chateaugay, New York, where he attended the public schools, and he afterwards attended school in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, and at Easthampton. After a short season of employment in the mills at Easthampton, he began to engage in electrical work,...

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Biography of Henry Edgar Maynard

HENRY EDGAR MAYNARD – The Maynards of this country can point with pride to a name of great antiquity. The name Manard or Maynard, appears in the Rolls of Battle Abbey, as among the Normans who came to England with William the Conqueror. John Maynard was appointed Governor of Breast Castle, in Brittany, July 28, 1352, by Edward, Prince of Wales. Sir Henry Maynard, the sixth in descent from John Maynard, mentioned above, was sheriff of Essex County, and was knighted by Queen Elizabeth. His son William, was created “Lord of Wicklow” in Ireland, May 30, 1520, by King James I. Lord William was made Baron of the Realm in 1620, by King Charles I. Whether any of these were ancestors of the Maynards in America is not known, but it shows the Maynard family as one of great prominence and antiquity in England. John Maynard, immigrant ancestor of the Maynards in this country, was born in England about 1610. He was a farmer for most of his life, but had the trade of a malster. He was a proprietor first of Cambridge, Massachusetts, May 29, 1644. He removed to Sudbury, and was one of the proprietors of that town. He was a selectman there in 1646. The name was spelled in the records Maynard, Mynard, and Minor. He was one of the forty-seven petitioners who divided the Sudbury...

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Biography of Harmon Pumpelly Read

HARMON PUMPELLY READ AMONG the young men of note in our city whose ancestry has filled an honorable place in American history, and who by his interest in the prosperity of his native town and his extensive knowledge of men and things in other lands, is the genial and accomplished Major H. P. Read. Born in the city of Albany on the 13th of July, 1860, when the storm of civil war was fast gathering to burst over the country, he descended from a long line of illustrious ancestors. His father, General John Meredith Read, was born in Philadelphia on the 21st of February, 1837; was educated at a military school; graduated with honor from Brown university; attended the Albany Law school, and studied civil and international law in Europe. He was admitted to the bar in Philadelphia, and afterward removed to this city. When but twenty years old he was appointed aide-de-camp to the governor of Rhode Island, having two years previously commanded a company of national cadets from which many commissioned officers were afterward furnished to the United States during the rebellion. He was actively engaged in the presidential campaign of 1856 in favor of Fremont, and in 1860 he organized the wide-awake movement in New York, which was an element of great power in the election of Lincoln. In 1859 General Read was married at Albany...

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Mattabesec Tribe

Mattabesec Indians (from massa-sepu─ôs-et, ‘at a [relatively] great rivulet or brook. Trumbull). An important Algonquian tribe of Connecticut, formerly occupying both banks of Connecticut river from Wethersfield to Middletown or to the coast and extending westward indefinitely. The Wongunk, Pyquaug, and Montowese Indians were apart of this tribe. According to Ruttenber they were a part of the Wappinger, and perhaps occupied the original territory from which colonies went out to overrun the country as far as Hudson river. The same author says their jurisdiction extended over all south west Connecticut, including the Mahackeno, Uncowa, Paugusset, Wepawaug, Quinnipiac, Montowese, Sukiang, and...

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Tunxis Tribe

Tunxis Indians (from Wuttunkshau, `the point where the river bends.’-Trumbull). An important tribe that lived on middle Farmington river near the great bend, about where Farmington and Southington Hartford County, Connecticut, are now. They were subject at an early period to Sequassen, the sachem who sold Hartford to the English. Ruttenber includes them in the Wappinger. They sold the greater part of their territory in 1610. About 1700 they still had a village of 20 wigwams at Farmington, but in 1761 there were only 4 or 5 families...

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Hartford County, Connecticut Census

1790 Hartford County, Connecticut Census Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1790 Hartford County, Census (images and index) $ Free 1790 Census Transcription Berlin Township Bristol Township East Hartford Township East Windsor Township Enfield Township Farmington Township Glastonbury Township Granby Township Newington Township Simsbury Township Southington Township Suffield Township Wethersfield Township Windsor Township Hosted at Census Guide 1790 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Hartford County, Connecticut Census Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1800 Hartford County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Hartford County, Connecticut Census Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1810 Hartford County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Hartford County, Connecticut Census Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1820 Hartford County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 Hartford County, Connecticut Census Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1830 Hartford County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 Hartford County, Connecticut Census...

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Hartford County, Connecticut Cemetery Records

Most of these cemetery listings are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Following is hosted by Allen County Public Library East Granby Center Cemetery Following pages hosted at Ray Brown’s New Place for New England Genealogy Bristol Old North Cemetery Green Hill Cemetery Lake Avenue Cemetery Bridge Street Cemetery The following cemeteries are hosted by Connecticut Tombstone Transcription Project Center Cemetery Index Surnames A – C Surnames D – H Surnames I – O Surnames P – S Surnames T – Z Eastbury Cemetery Index Oneco Cemetery Index Grand Street Cemetery Surnames A- C Surnames D – N Surnames O – Z Wooster Cemetery Buckland Cemetery Section A Section B Section C Section D Section E Section U Pine Hill Cemetery Hillside Cemetery Following pages hosted at Connecticut USGenWeb Archives East Cemetery Eastbury Cemetery, Index Eastbury Cemetery Oneco Cemetery, Index Oneco Cemetery Following pages hosted at Interment) Buckland cemetery Cedar Hill Cemetery East Cemetery Elm Grove Cemetery Forestville Cemetery Mountain View Cemetery (partial) Mount Saint Benedict Cemetery Palisado Cemetery Rose Hill Cemetery Zion Hill Cemetery  ...

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Biography of Frank Whitman Roberts

FRANK WHITMAN ROBERTS – The surname Roberts is frequently encountered in the early records of New England. There were Revolutionary soldiers, farmers, business men, and seafaring men of that name, and their progeny is today scattered over the land, while many descendants of the older settlers of the name still adhere to the original soil. The seafaring men of generations past in New England were venturesome and enterprising persons, some of them whalers, others traders with the West Indies, whose islands then had even more glamorous and romantic atmospheres than they have today, although they are still glamorous and romantic. Among those of the later generations of the Roberts name was William Roberts, thought to have been born in Middletown, Connecticut He died in Feeding Hills, in the town of Agawam, Massachusetts. He is thought to have been the son of Simeon Roberts, of Middletown. He married (first) Beulah Hedges; and (second) Sarah Hedges. His children were: Isaac, of whom further; Horace, William, Henry, Eleanor, Betsy, Laura, Beulah. Isaac Roberts, son of William Roberts, was born at Feeding Hills, Agawam, Massachusetts, March 3 1803, died at Feeding Hills in 1889. He was a farmer. He married, April 3, 1834, Cornelia Clark, born in Connecticut, October 29, 1810, died November 7, 1876. They had one child, Morton Samuel, of whom further. Morton Samuel Roberts, son of Isaac and Cornelia (Clark)...

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel D. Cowles

COWLES & MCDANIEL. – Samuel D. Cowles, senior member of the firm above-mentioned, was born in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1829, his father being a wealthy broker. He received a ten years’ naval training and finished his education in New York City, where in after years he was in business for himself. In 1849 he crossed the plains to California. In 1862 we find him crossing the plains once more, coming from Missouri in company with a nephew and niece. At Soda Springs a band of Indians, under the leadership of one of his own employe’s, attacked is party and after a short fusillade escaped with, seventeen of his fine, blooded horses. At Fort Hall the nephew died. Arriving at Auburn, Oregon, in September, Mr. Cowles set to work to recuperate his finances by day’s labor. On the last day in the year, he encamped with his little company on the present site of the village of Cove, in Union county, upon the handsome tract of land now owned by the niece mentioned above, then Miss Fanny Cowles, a native of Tennessee, and for whom the majestic mountain peak that towers into perpetual snows and keeps watch over her elegant home was...

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Biography of Rev. Cushing Eels, D. D.

REV. CUSHING EELS, D.D. – Dr. Eells was born at Blandford, Massachusetts, February 16, 1810, and was the son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Warner) Eells. He was descended from Samuel Eells, who was a major in Cromwell’s army, and who came to America in 1661. Cushing Eells was brought up at Blandford, became a Christian when fifteen years old, prepared for college at Monson Academy, Massachusetts, entered Williams College in 1830, and graduated four years later. The distance from his home to college was forty-five miles. Twice he rode the entire distance, – when he entered and after he graduated, – twice from one-half to two-thirds of the way; and the rest of the trips he walked too poor to pay his way. Three years later he graduated from East Windsor Theological Seminary, of Connecticut (now at Hartford), and was ordained at Blandford, Massachusetts, October 25, 1837, as a Congregational minister. While teaching school at Holden, Massachusetts, he became acquainted with Miss Myra Fairbank, to whom he was afterwards married. She was the daughter of Dea. Joshua, and Mrs. Sally Fairbank, and was born at Holden, Massachusetts, May 26, 1805. It is said that both on her father’s and mother’s sides she was pure Yankee. She made a profession of religion when thirteen years old, and at the celebration of her seventieth birthday said that she had never been...

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Biography of Louis H. Chapman

Louis H. Chapman, commissioner of water and light of Kansas City, Kansas, is the man chiefly responsible for bringing these municipally owned plants to a perfection of service where they completely justify the management and control by the city. Mr. Chapman is an expert electrician and general engineer, and has achieved a significant success through his own energies and ambitions. He has been a resident of Kansas the greater part of the time since 1886. He was born at Hartford, Connecticut, June 17, 1873, the youngest of the nine children of John Oliver and Louisa E. (Smart) Chapman. His parents were both natives of Connecticut. John O. Chapman was master mechanic of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railway, but gave up that position and brought his family west to Iowa in 1881. Here he became master mechanic of the Iowa Division of the Chicago Northwestern Railway, with headquarters at Clinton. In 1884 he moved his family to Kansas City, Kansas, and accepted a similar position with the Union Pacific Railway. While in service he was injured, and in 1888 was compelled to give up his position. After that he spent much of his time in travel, and in 1892 removed to Chicago, where he died in April, 1893. He enjoyed large responsibilities, was paid a corresponding salary, but spent most of it liberally to provide home and...

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Biographical Sketch of John Andrus

(I) John Andrus, immigrant ancestor, came from Essex county, England, and settled at Tunxis, later named Farmington, Connecticut, in 1640. A complete history of the family will be found in “Andrews Memorial,” compiled by Alfred Andrews, of New Britain, Connecticut, and published by A. H. Andrews & Company, of Chicago, Illinois, in 1872. John Andrus married...

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Biographical Sketch of Luke Guyer

Luke Guyer, one of the three original settlers, came to Wolcott about 1790, from Hartford, Conn., and located on what is now known as the Guyer farm. He was a blacksmith by trade, and built the first blacksmith shop in the town. John, son of Luke, came here with his father, and was a resident of the town until his death. John reared a family of four children, none of whom are now living. Hezekiah, son of John, died on the old homestead, in 1895, aged eighty-one years. His widow still survives him, age seventy-nine years. Earl Guyer, son of Hezekiah, is a resident of the...

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Biographical Sketch of William Smith

William Smith, a native of Hartford, Conn., immigrated to Williston, Vt., at an early date, where he married Anna Blanchard, and a few years later, about ,806, came to this town and located upon the farm now occupied by his grandsons, where he resided until his death, at the age of fifty-nine years. He had a family of six children, three of whom, Charity, widow of Roswell Town, Lemuel B., and Abel P., now reside...

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