Location: Hartford County CT

Washington Irving at Fort Gibson, 1832

The McIntosh Creeks had been located along Arkansas River near the Verdigris on fertile timbered land which they began at once to clear, cultivate, and transform into productive farms. The treaty of 1828 with the Cherokee gave the latter a great tract of land on both sides of Arkansas River embracing that on which the Creeks were located. This was accomplished by a blunder of the Government officials, in the language of the Secretary of War, 1U.S. House, Executive Documents, 22d congress, first session, no. 116, President’s Message submitting the memorial of the Creek Indians. “when we had not...

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Collections of the Connecticut Historical Society

From 1860 to 1930 The Connecticut Historical Society published a series containing items from their collection of historical documents. The following are the 24 volumes of their works freely made available online. To assist the researcher with determining the contents for each volume, we’ve included such in the description. Connecticut genealogists will want to pay particular attention to Volumes 8-10, 12, 14, and 22. Willis and Wyllys family researchers, who descend from George Wyllys will be ecstatic over volume 21. And to our Native American friends, volumes 2 and 3 contain some information on early Connecticut Indians. Collections of...

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Olcott Family of Norwich Vermont

Hon. Peter Olcott was born at Bolton, Connecticut, April 25, 1733; married Sarah, daughter of Peletiah Mills, Esq., of Windsor, Conn., October 11, 1759, and removed to that place in 1772. That year or the following one he came to Norwich, Vermont. He was the oldest of his parents’ four children (two sons and two daughters), and the only one of them to come to Norwich to reside. Mr. Olcott‘s name first appears in the town records of Norwich in 1773, when he was chosen one of the overseers of the poor, at the annual March meeting. He early took a leading part in public affairs in his new home. He was elected to the most important town offices, and soon came to be regarded as one of the leading men of the place. It is probable that he was a man of considerable means when he came to Norwich, which, united with his superior talents, gave him a commanding influence in the community. The next year (1774) the annual town meeting was held at his house, and such meetings continued to be so held until 1779, after which they were held at the meeting house, except in severe winter weather. Probably his influence was potent in fixing the location of the first meeting house very near to his residence and upon land which he gave for a site....

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Lewis Family of Norwich Vermont

William Lewis and family, consisting of his wife, Naomi, five sons and three daughters, (Joseph, his eldest son, having been a citizen of the town for some years) came to Norwich in 1781 or 1782 from Windsor, Hartford county, Connecticut, and settled on a farm now owned by Benjamin Clifford, where he resided for a number of years. In 1787 he purchased the farm now occupied by John W. Hutchinson. From time to time he added to it by purchase until at his death it contained 250 acres of good land, mostly covered with a large growth of timber. This farm came into the possession of Noah Lewis, youngest son of William (by will), who owned and occupied it until 1815, when he sold it to Moses Davis, for $3,000, and himself and family immigrated to Kentucky. This farm remained in possession of the Davis family for more than forty years. Mr. Lewis was by trade a blacksmith and carried on that business for a number of years in a shop that stood near where O. W. Hazen lately lived. From the time Mr. Lewis became a citizen of the town he took an active part in the management of its affairs. He was chosen moderator and selectman in 1784 and ’85, and again moderator and selectman in 1786, ’87, ’88, ’89, ’92, ’93, ’95 and ’96. Mr. Lewis...

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Early Indian Wars in New England

The history of the settlers of New England is fraught with the troubles of Indian hostilities. This is a history of the early Indian wars in New England. In 1620, a company belonging to Mr. Robinson’s church, at Leyden, in Holland, foreseeing many inconveniences likely to increase, from the residence of English dissenters under a foreign government, and hoping to find an asylum, and a refuge from persecution in the New World, applied to King James for liberty to place themselves in some part of New England; and obtained a grant of some place about Hudson river. They set...

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Genealogy of Matthew Woodruff of Farmington Connecticut

NOTE-Regarding Woodruff’s of Wooley, England. Regarding the genealogy of the Woodruff Family, published in Volume III of the Colonial Families of the United States, will say that the circumstances surrounding the record of Matthew Woodruff in said book are as follows: Sometime in 1910 a party called on me stating that his name was Norris Woodruff. that he was from England and naturally well acquainted with the Woodruff Families there, that he was a descendant of the Woodruffs of Wooley, England, and for a consideration would give out details that would establish a direct connection between the Woodruffs of England and the Woodruffs of the United States. Naturally I was interested and agreed to pay his price for said information, which was as follows: The Genealogy of Woodruffs of Wooley, England. Coming down to the time of Sir David Woodruff of Poyle, Min married in 1611 Lettice Duncombe. Issue: Matthew, born 1612 and died 1682 Thomas David George Robert Nicholas Six daughters He claimed he had investigated and found that Matthew Woodruff, the emigrant, was born in London in 1612, that he came from England with his wife, Hannah, and settled in Hartford, Conn., and died in Farmington, Conn., in 1682. I advised him to take up the matter with Mr. George N. Mackenzie who was to publish Volume III of the Colonial Families of the United States. Later...

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Genealogy of Nicholas Baker of Scituate Massachusetts

K155 NICHOLAS BAKER: b. in England, 1610; d. in Scituate, Mass., 1678; St. John’s College, Cambridge, Eng., 1632; M.A. 1635; ordained as a minister in Scituate, and served the Puritan Church there until death; may have married his first wife in Eng.; m. (2), 1663. Samuel: 1628-1714; m. Fear Robinson; m. (2), Abigail (Lathrop) Huntington; lived in Hull, Barnstable, Norwich, Conn., Windham and Windsor, Conn. John: 1672-1763; m. Anna Annable; purchased lands in Windham County, Conn., 1643. Samuel: 1706-1791; m. Prudence Jenkins. Samuel: 1740-1812; m. Lydia Smith; m. (2), Chloe Silsby; m. (3), Sarah Farnham; established a separatist church called the “Brunswick Church”. Erastus: b. 1764. Ephraim: b. 1766; m. Phebe Edgerton Abbott; m. (2), Mary Kelsey; moved from Windham Co., to Salisbury, and then to Catskill, N. Y. Henry: moved to North Carolina before the Civil War. Charles: 1790-1853; m. Eleanor Abeel; a capt. in the War of 1812; in 1838, located in Columbus Twp., St. Clair Co., Mich. Moses Cantine: 1823-1894; m. Clarisa Thurston, moved to Oceana Co., Mich. Ch.:  Ashley Cantine: b. 1849; m. Beatrice Woodward.  Henry Woodward (b. 1887; m. Elsie Phipps), Floyd Miller (b. 1897). Frank E.: b. 1851; m. Emma Hall; d. 1907; had Clyde Harvey (b. 1882). Garrett A.: m.; in 1883 lived near Marshville, Mich. Ch.: Everett; Albert; William; Moses Cantine. Henry Augustus: m.; d. at Port Huron, Mich., 1873. Charles Nelson: 1832-1875;...

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Hubbard Genealogy

George Hubbard George1 Hubbard was first in Watertown, Mass., about 1633; m. Mary Bishop, who d. at Guilford, Conn., Sept. 14, 1675. She was dau. of John and Ann Bishop, who moved to Guilford in 1639, where he, Bishop, was one of the seven prop. of the town, and d. there, February, 1661. On May 6, 1635, permission from the General Court of Massachusetts was granted to the inhabitants of Watertown “to remove themselves to any place they shall think meet to make choice of, provided they still continue under the government.” Among these immigrators was George Hubbard and family and his father-in-law, John Bishop and family. George Hubbard was the representative of Wethersfield, Conn., at the first Colonial General Court, under the Constitution of 1639. He went from Wethersfield and settled at Milford on Long Island, “being assigned Milford Island as his grant. He was one of those persons whose names are hereunto written-who are allowed to be free planters, having for the present, liberty to act in the choice of public officers for the carrying on of public affairs in this plantation. Mr. George Hubbard came from Wethersfield.” Before 1650 he sold Milford Island to Richard Bryan, and moved with his son-in-law John Fowler to Guilford, where his wife’s parents, John and Ann Bishop, had become residents. George Hubbard was admitted to church membership in Guilford, Oct. 6,...

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Biographical Sketch of William Smith

William Smith, a native of Hartford, Conn., immigrated to Williston, Vt., at an early date, where he married Anna Blanchard, and a few years later, about 1806, came to this town and located upon the farm now occupied by his grandsons, where he resided until his death, at the age of fifty-nine years. He had a family of six children, three of whom, Charity, widow of Roswell Town, Lemuel B., and Abel P., now reside...

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Descendants of John Abbe

JOHN ABBE, settled in Salem, Mass. He was entered as “Inhabitant” ye 2nd of 11 month 1636.” His wife, Mary Loring, died in Wenham, Mass., Sept. 9, 1662. He then married Mary, widow of Robert Goldsmith, Nov. 25, 1674. He was granted land most of which was situated in Enon, that part afterwards called Wenham, Mass. He joined the church a short time before his death in 1698 (as only church members could make wills) and he made over his property to his eldest son John in trust in which son John is to give life support to his father and father’s wife and to pay certain legacies to his children, which are all named. This will of, Deed of Trust in Salem, Mass., Probate Records was entered Aug. 3, 1683, and in the Deed of Trust he twice mentions his children. But for some reason his estate was settled by his youngest son Thomas, for the Essex County Probate Court Records show that letters of administration were granted to Thomas Abbe, son of John Abbe, senior, Dec. 12, 1702. Their children were as follows: John, died in Wenham, Mass. Samuel, settled in Windham, Conn. Sarah Mercy, married Mr. Killam. Rebeckah, married Richard Kimball. Obadiah, settled in Enfield; married but no children. (2) Thomas, b. 1656, Wareham, Mass.; d. Enfield, Conn., May 17, 1728. LIEUT. THOMAS (2), son of...

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Descendants of Matthew Woodruff

MATTHEW WOODRUFF (1) and wife Hannah, came from Hartford to Farmington in 1640-1. He was one of the eighteen proprietors of the Town of Farmington in 1672, having been admitted as a freeman in 1637, (History of Southington, Conn.. Page CCIVII.) He died at very old age in 1652. He was a man of considerable wealth for those days. He joined the church March 1st, 1672. His will probated Dec. 13th, 1682. mentions his wife, Hannah, who was admitted to the church in Farmington, April 2, 1634, also his will mentions three sons and a daughter named Hannah. wife of Richard Seymour, 2nd, but the Probate Court supplies name of another daughter Elizabeth, wife of John Broughton of Northampton, Mass. Matthew and Hannah Woodruff had children as follows: John, b. 1643; d. 1692. Matthew, b. 1646; d. Nov. 1691 at Farmington, Conn.: m. Man, C _y Plumb at Milford, Conn., June 16, 1668. He married 2nd wife, Sarah North in 1686; she was b. Dec. 23, 1653; d. 1692. She was the daughter of John and Mary (Bird) North. Matthew lived in Milford, Conn., until death of his first wife, then returned to Farmington, Conn. He was a freeman 1671. Adm. of his estate granted Dec. 3, 1691. (See, Hartford Court Probate Records.) Hannah, b. 1648; m. Richard Seymour. Elizabeth, b. 1651; m. in 1678 John Broughton of Northampton....

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Biography of Mrs. Laura E. Newell

The gift of poetry, that beautiful art which is the product of the imaginative powers and fancy and bears an appeal to these powers, perhaps dumb, in others, sets a little apart its possessor from the everyday experiences of the majority. That its highest development, however, by no means interferes with life’s duties and responsibilities, finds proof in the career of Mrs. Laura E. Newell, a sweet singer of Kansas, who had written some of the most touching and the most inspiring poems of her day and generation. Mrs. Newell was born at New Marlborough, Connecticut, February 5, 1854. In infancy she was left an orphan and after the death of her mother, her aunt, Mrs. Hiram Mabie, adopted and reared her, Mr. and Mrs. Mabie residing then in the State of New York. They came to Kansas in 1858, Mrs. Newell then being but four years old. Mr. Mabie settled at Wamega, in Waubansie County and died there in 1860. Mrs. Mabie was a highly educated lady, holding a life teacher’s certificate granted her by New York, and after Mr. Mabie’s death she resumed school teaching in Kansas, in 1860 becoming an instructor in the Village of Topeka, teaching the second school organized, and taught at Topeka for many succeeding years. Subsequently she was married to J. W. Emerson, a native of Massachusetts and a veteran of the...

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Biography of Lauren Newell

For more than thirty years Zeandale Township, Riley County, had been the chosen home of Lauren Newell, an old pioneer of this section and an honored veteran of the Civil war. Mr. Newell came to Kansas a youth of nineteen years, in search of material independence, and had done much in the way of making easier the paths of those who came later. After the close of the Civil war settlement in Kansas was rapid, but few found so much hardship as had faced young and old when they reached here in 1858. In his New England home Mr. Newell, with practical forethought, had learned a trade and hence was much better prepared to face the future than were hundreds of others who had turned to the West as a field of opportunity, with no tools to grasp the opportunities when they found them. Lauren Newell was born August 4, 1838, at Southington, Connecticut. His parents were Cromwell and Lavina (Moore) Newell. In his native place the youth had school advantages and there learned the carpenter’s trade, at the age of nineteen years completing his apprenticeship and turning then to the West to make practical use of his knowledge. He found work at Topeka, Kansas, and was in that city when the Civil war was precipitated. In May, 1861, an echo, perhaps, from the old patriotic spirit that had...

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Slave Narrative of Mom Jessie Sparrow

Interviewer: Annie Ruth Davis Person Interviewed: Jessie Sparrow Date of Interview: December 1937 Location: Marion, South Carolina Age: 83 “No, I ain’ cold. I settin in de sun. Miss Ida, she went by here just now en call at me bout de door been open en lettin dat cold wind blow in on my back wid all de fire gone out. I tell her, it ain’ botherin me none, I been settin out in de sun. Well, I don’ feel much to speak bout, child, but I knockin round somehow. Miss Ida, she bring me dis paper to study on. She does always be bringin me de Star cause she know dat I love to see de news of Marion. It right sad bout de Presbyterian preacher, but everybody got to die, I say. Right sad though. We hear dat church bell here de other evenin en we never know what it been tollin for. I holler over dere to Maggie house en ax her how-come de church bell tollin, but she couldn’ tell me nothin bout it. Reckon some chillun had get hold of it, she say. I tell her, dat bell never been pull by no chillun cause I been hear death note in it. Yes, honey, de people sho gwine horne (grieve) after Dr. Holladay.” “I say, I doin very well myself en I thankful I...

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Biographical Sketch of Eugene F. Ware

Eugene F. Ware, a soldier of Iowa, a lawyer and public man of Kansas, and an author both of that state and Missouri, was born at Hartford, Connecticut, May 29, 1841. His parents moved to Burlington, Iowa, in his childhood and he was educated in the public schools of that place. During the Civil war he reached the rank of captain in the Fourth Iowa Cavalry. He took a section of land in Cherokee County, Kansas, in 1867, studied law and was admitted to the bar at Fort Scott and to the United States Supreme Court; entered the law firm of McComas & McKeighan at Fort Scott; in 1874 married Miss Jeanette P. Huntington of Rochester, New York, and was for many years editor of the Fort Scott Monitor. His political career consisted of two terms in the Kansas Legislature, 1879 to 1883, and three years as United States pension commissioner– 1902 to 1905. He was prominent in the republican party; was a delegate to two of its national conventions; was a member of the Sons of the American Revolution, the Bar Association, the Loyal Legion and the Society of the Mayflower Descendants. His home for some years was at Topeka, from which place he moved to Kansas City, Kansas, about 1909 where he practiced law in partnership with his son until the spring of 1911 when both retired...

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