Select Page

Location: Harrison County WV

West Virginia Naturalization Records

Naturalization to become a U.S. citizen was a two-part process: the Declaration of Intent to Naturalize, or First Papers, and the Naturalization Record (including the Naturalization Petition), or Final Papers. The First Papers were normally filed five years before the Final Papers because of the five-year residency requirement to become a citizen. No centralized files existed before 1906. In 1906 federal forms replaced the various formats that had been used by the various courts. Copies were sent to the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), creating a central file for naturalization papers. The INS is now known as the U.S....

Read More

Biography of John P. Brady

John P. Brady. Since he was fifteen years of age John P. Brady had had a varied and extensive experience as an oil worker. He began in his native state of Pennsylvania, and had been in most of the important oil fields of the country. For the past few years he had had his home at Havans, and is one of the leading individual producers in that section. His birth occurred at Parkers Landing in Pennsylvania on June 3, 1876. His people, however, were early settlers of Ohio. His grandfather Barney Brady was born in County Cavan, Ireland, came to the United States when young, and acquired a homestead in Southern Ohio at Hamden. He died there at the age of eighty-eight. Jerome Brady, father of John P., was born at Hamden, Ohio, in 1835, and lived there until the breaking out of the Civil war. He then enlisted and served four years in an Ohio regiment, and made a most ereditable record as a soldier, participating in many of the historic battles, including the Battle of the Wilderness. After the war he was attracted to the oil fielde of Western Pennsylvania, going first to Oil Oreek, and was a producer from 1865 until 1900. He also owned a farm with some oil wells on it at Parkers Landing. In 1900, on retiring from the oil industry, he returned...

Read More

Ankrom, Edward Conway – Obituary

Halfway, Oregon Edward Conway Ankrom, 85, a longtime Halfway resident, died Dec. 22, 2000, at St. Elizabeth Health Services. His memorial service will be Thursday at 1 p.m. at the Halfway Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. President Lon Nalder of the LDS Church will officiate. Disposition was by cremation at the Eastern Oregon Pioneer Crematory. Mr. Ankrom was born Sept. 17, 1915, at Salem, W.Va., to Connie Eli Ankrom and Bertha Maude Matheny. While he was a young boy he, along with his family, moved to Augusta, Ill., where they lived until he was six years old. From there they moved to Michigan. When he was 19 he, like many other young men of the times, spent a summer in the wheat fields in Texas and through the Dakotas. From there he moved to the West Coast, where he went to work in the defense plants during World War II. After this period of his life he started driving truck and worked for many companies until he went to work for Darigold, where he worked until his retirement in 1972. He moved to Halfway in 1977, where he met and married Lois Colyer in 1978. Mr. Ankrom is survived by his wife, Lois Ankrom; a son and daughter-in-law, Jim and Donna Ankrom of Snohomish, Wash.; a stepson and daughter-in-law, Jay and Carolyn Short of Trout Run, Pa.;...

Read More

Biography of H. Titchenal

H. Titchenal, of Santa Ana, was born in Harrison County, West Virginia, January 2, 1817, a son of John R. and Rebecca (Harbertt) Titchenal, both natives of West Virginia. His father, a black-smith by trade, moved to Missouri in 1819, and in 1833 to the vicinity of Fort Smith, Arkansas, where he died January 16, 1831. The second of his nine children, the subject of this sketch, and a sister, are the only surviving members of the family. Mr. Titchenal was brought up to the life of a stock-raiser. From 1835 to 1852 he followed his calling, and also mercantile business, after 1849, in Texas. He then came overland through Mexico to the Pacific Coast and then by sail to San Francisco, landing July 9, 1852. After following mining and teaming for awhile, he moved to San Juan, in Monterey County; was a resident of Mariposa County from 1855 to 1868, and March 4, 1869, he started for Southern California, arriving at Santa Ana November 9. He first bought two lots and followed farming and. teaming. In 1871 he bought thirty-six acres of land and erected the first dwelling-house in Santa Ana, on lots No. 8 and 9. In 1881-86 he built the Titchenal block, on Fourth street, at a cost of about $16,000. The structure is a fine two-story brick, with seventy-five feet frontage and eight five feet...

Read More

Biography of R. A. Traver

R. A. Traver, of the firm of Traver & Nixon, manufacturers of and dealers in brooms, brushes, etc., Charleston; was born in Schenectady Co., N. Y., Aug. 19, 1837; he was raised on a farm; in 1856, he removed with his parents to Brooklyn, N. Y., where, for two years, he was employed as a book-keeper for A. W. Hendrickson & Co., coal-dealers; in 1858, he went to Harrison Co., W. Va., where he was engaged in farming and carpentering till 1867; he then came to Clark Co., Ill., and engaged in the broom business, but soon afterward removed to Charleston, where he established the Charleston Broom-Factory, and has been an enterprising citizen of the city ever since; he is at present a member of the Board of Aldermen. His partner in the business, M. C. Nixon, is a native of Harrison Co., W. Va., his father being one of the most prominent farmers in that part of the State; at the age of 18, he went to Pittsburgh, Penn., where he received a thorough business education in the Iron City Business College; he then spent a few years in traveling in the West, and, in 1874, came to Charleston and entered into partnership with Mr. Traver. When Mr. Traver came to Charleston, there were but about fifteen acres of broomcorn cultivated in Coles Co.; its culture is now...

Read More

Search


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest