Location: Hardin County KY

Biographical Sketch of the Brown Brothers, Richard and Daniel

Brown Bros., Richard and Daniel, farming, stock and road grading and ditching; P. O. Humbolt; are natives of Nelson and Hardin Cos., Ky.; they were born Dec. 22, 1826, and July 22, 1832, respectively. They were born on the farm, and have always followed farming; they lived in Kentucky until the fall of 1854, when they came to Illinois, and settled about ten miles south of Charleston, where they lived about three months; they then moved on the Springfield road, in Douglas Co., where they lived one year, when, in 1856, they came to the present place, and have lived here since. With the exception of a term as Assessor by Richard, they have held no office, except connected with the school and road. Richard Brown married Miss Elizabeth Morrison, of Kentucky, Sept. 23, 1852; she died Nov. 7, 1860. They had five children, two living, viz., Sally Ann and Mary Jane. His present wife was Mrs. O’Bannon, formerly Miss Elizabeth Ann Bridwell; they were married Feb. 16, 1862; they have two children, viz., Ida B. and Richard Alonzo. He owns over 200 acres in this township, which he has earned by his own labor and management. Daniel Brown married Miss Mary Morrison, of Kentucky, Dec. 3, 1853. They had seven children, five living, viz., John P., William A., Susan T., James H. and Alburtis R. He owns over...

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Slave Narrative of William M. Quinn

Interviewer: Henry Jackson Person Interviewed: William M. Quinn Location: Indianapolis, Indiana Place of Birth: Hardin County, Kentucky Place of Residence: 431 Bright Street, Indianapolis, Indiana Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Harry Jackson WILLIAM M. QUINN (EX-SLAVE) 431 Bright Street, Indianapolis, Ind. William M. Quinn, 431 Bright street, was a slave up to ten years of age-“when the soldiers come back home, and the war was over, and we wasn’t slaves anymore”. Mr. Quinn was born in Hardin County, Kentucky, on a farm belonging to Steve Stone. He and a brother and his mother were slaves of “Old Master Stone”, but his father was owned by another man, Mr. Quinn, who had an adjoining farm. When they were all freed, they took the surname of Quinn. Mr. Quinn said that they were what was called “gift slaves”. They were never to be sold from the Stone farm and were given to Stone’s daughter as a gift with that understanding. He said that his “Old master paid him and his brother ten cents a day for cutting down corn and shucking it.” It was very unusual for a slave to receive any money whatsoever for working. He said that his master had a son about his age, and the son and he and his brother worked around the farm together, and “Master Stone” gave all three...

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Slave Narrative of Celia Henderson

Interviewer: Miriam Logan Person Interviewed: Celia Henderson Location: Ohio Place of Birth: Hardin County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1849 Age: 88 Miriam Logan Lebanon, Ohio MRS. CELIA HENDERSON, aged 88 Born Hardin County, Kentucky in 1849 (drawing of Celia Henderson) [TR: no drawing found] “Mah mammy were Julia Dittoe, an pappy, he were name Willis Dittoe. Dey live at Louieville till mammy were sold fo’ her marster’s debt. She were a powerful good cook, mammy were-an she were sol’ fo to pay dat debt.” “She tuk us four chillen ‘long wid her, an pappy an th’ others staid back in Louieville. Dey tuk us all on a boat de Big Ribber-evah heah ob de big ribber? Mississippi its name-but we calls it de big ribber.” “Natchez on de hill-dats whaah de tuk us to. Nactchez-on-de-hill dis side of N’ Or’leans. Mammy she have eleven chillen. No ’em, don’t ‘member all dem names no mo’. No ’em, nevah see pappy no moah. Im ‘member mammy cryin’ goin’ down on de boat, and us chillen a cryin’ too, but de place we got us was a nice place, nicer den what we left. Family ‘o name of GROHAGEN it was dat got us. Yas’em dey was nice to mammy fo’ she was a fine cook, mammy wus. A fine cook!” “Me? Go’Long! I ain’t no sech cook as my mammy was....

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Biographical Sketch of Robert B. Mitchell, Gen.

Gen. Robert B. Mitchell was a soldier of the Mexican war from Ohio, a leading figure of Kansas territorial days, one of the ablest officers of the Oivil war representing the Union army of the state, and finally governor of the Territory of New Mexico. He was born in Richland County, Ohio, April 4, 1823; educated at Washington College in Pennsylvania, after which he studied law; was admitted to the bar, and practiced at Mansfield, Ohio, from 1844 to 1846. He then entered the army as a first lientenant in an Ohio regiment and served through the Mexican war, resuming his law practice in 1847_ In 1856 he moved to Kansas, where he became an active participant in political affairs as a free-state advocate, and in 1857 was elected to the legislature. From 1858 to 1861 he held the office of territorial treasurer. At the outbreak of the Civil war he entered the army as colonel of the Second Kansas, and was severely wounded at the battle of Wilson’s Creek. Subsequently he raised a regiment of cavalry and was commissioned brigadier general of volunteers. At the battle of Perryville, Kentucky, October 8, 1862, he commanded a division of the Third Army Corps, and at Chickamauga was in command of the cavalry corps of the Army of the Cumberland. At the close of the war he was appointed governor of...

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Biography of D.W. Dinges

D. W. Dinges, a notary public, and a leading business man of Alexandria, was born in 1836, in Warren County, Va., the youngest of five children of Wm. M. and Clara P. E. (Lincoln) Dinges, both natives of Virginia. The father was born about 1810, of Scotch- Dutch decent, a son of Mortica Dinges. He was a blacksmith, and spent his entire life in his native State, where he died in 1837. His wife was born about 1814, and is living in White County. She moved to Tennessee soon after her husband’s death. She has been three times married; is a consistent member of the Christian Church. Our subject received rather limited educational advantages at Sparta. He taught school about three years. In 1861 he enlisted in Company K, Sixteenth Tennessee Infantry, serving principally in Tennessee, West Virginia and South Carolina. In 1862 he took part in the battle of Perryville, and was captured near Barbersville, Ky.; in a few hours was paroled, returned home and about three months later joined the Eighth Tennessee Cavalry under Gen. Dibrell. He participated in the battle at Sparta, was again captured and paroled, and returned home after serving his country gallantly, for three and a half years. In 1865 he moved to Alexandria and began merchandising, in partnership with W. H. Lincoln, the firm being known as Dinges & Lincoln. They did...

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Biography of W. W. Moore

W. W. MOORE. He who is careful of small things, and who earns a reputation for honesty and reliability by observing the promises he has made, is already on the high road to a consummation of his hopes. Such an one is W. W. Moore, who is a prominent general merchant of Protem, Missouri He was born in Hardin County, Kentucky, in 1844, a son of Henry and Nancy (Litsey) Moore, who were born in Kentucky, in which State the father spent his life in the occupation of farming, his death occurring in 1867. His father, George Moore, was a Virginian by birth, but he was brought up in Kentucky, and died before the subject of this sketch had any recollection of him. He was of Irish extraction and a farmer by occupation. The maternal grandparents, James Litsey and wife, died on Blue Grass soil. W. W. Moore is the eldest of six sons and six daughters born to his parents: Harrison and Mattie, Ann, Sarah, Mary and Hannah, deceased; Josie, James, John, Horace (who resides in Protem, Missouri), Harvey and W. W. The latter received the education and rearing of the average farmer’s boy of his day, and at the age of twenty-one began farming for himself, continuing this for several years. He was married in 1866 to Susan, daughter of David and Lizzie Burnett, who came from...

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Biography of Peter J. Holohan

The gentleman whose name appears above claims distinction as having been one of the first settlers at Wallace, Idaho, and as a member of the firm of Holohan & McKinlay, dealers in tobacco and cigars, he is recognized as one of the prominent business men of that city. He is a native of Hardin county, Kentucky, and is a son of Michael and Ann (Welsh) Holohan, natives of Ireland, who came early in life to the United States and met and married here, settling in Kentucky about 1850. Michael Holohan died in Idaho, in 1880, aged about fifty years, and his widow, now about sixty-two years old, is living at Wallace. They had eight children, of whom six are now living, and of whom Peter J. Holohan was the second in order of nativity. At nine years of age Peter J. Holohan accompanied his parents and brothers and sisters from Kentucky to Iowa, where the family lived until 1878. He then went to Oregon, but remained only a short time before settling with his father’s family on Camas prairie, in Idaho (now in Idaho county), where he lived until 1885, five years after his father’s death, and then came to Wallace, where he was one of the first settlers. Mr. Holohan’s first enterprise after taking up his residence at Wallace was in packing merchandise to the various mining camps...

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Biography of Job Francis Dye

Among the figures who stand prominently forth on the pages of western history is the gentleman whose name introduces this review. His was a marvelous record of long connection with the events which go to make up the annals of the Pacific coast. He was one of those honored pioneers who blazed a path for future cavalcades to follow; who bravely turned their faces from the cities of the east, with all the advantages of wealth and civilization, and cast their fortunes with the western frontier, in all its wildness and primitive modes of life; who, rather than enjoy the comforts of their former homes, chose to endure the hardships of a wider and freer country; and who made out of those very obstacles, which, to a weaker class of men would have been stumbling blocks, the stepping stones to wealth and renown, none of these great men are more noted for untiring perseverance and steady progress which have resulted in the acquirement of wealth and the well merited esteem of their fellow men than the gentleman whose name heads this memoir. He realized with great prophetic foresight the magnitude of the prospects of the west, and that at a time when this section of the country gave but slight signs of her future greatness. If, as is maintained, the history of a country is best told in the...

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Biography of Timothy S. Givan

Timothy S. Givan, editor and proprietor of the Tullahoma Messenger, one of the prominent weekly papers of Middle Tennessee, was born in Hardin County, October 8, 1845. He is the son of James M. and Mellona (Needham) Givan, both of whom were born in Kentucky, the former November 4, 1811, and the latter September 19, 1819. The parents, married October 9, 1834, had ten children born to them, six of whom were boys, and of these our subject is the youngest. The mother died April 4, 1854, and in 1856 the father married Rachael Clark. He died October 5, 1859. The childhood days of our subject were spent on the farm, and at the age of ten years he entered the office of the Cloverport (Kentucky) Journal, where he served an apprenticeship of four years. Previous to the breaking out of the civil war, he taught a term of five months in his native state, and when the crisis came, enlisted in the Federal Army, joining at first, Company I, Thirty seventh Regiment of Kentucky Mounted Infantry, and later, the Sixteenth and Second Regiments of United States Regulars. He was subsequently commissioned teacher and chaplain of the Second United States Regulars, and also post chaplain and librarian for the garrison at Mobile, Alabama. At the close of the war he returned to Kentucky and re-entered the newspaper business in...

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Biographical Sketch of James Brandenburg

James Brandenburg, farmer; P. O. Diona; was born in Hardin Co., Ky., April 20, 1820; when he was about 3 years of age, his parents moved to Clay Co., Ind., and from there, in the year 1829, came to this county. Mr. Brandenburg lived at home, working in the neighborhood, until he was 18 years of age, when he went to Wisconsin and was engaged in teaming for two years; in 1844, he settled southeast of Salisbury, in this township, and lived there for twelve or thirteen years, when he purchased a farm on Sec. 32, and after being there thirteen years, moved to his present farm on Sec. 7, where he has resided ever since. Mr. Brandenburg is the eldest son of Solomon Brandenburg. He married Jan. 29, 1843, Miss Neety Cooper, daughter of Jeremiah Cooper, a native of North Carolina, who settled in Coles Co. in the year 1839; they had seven children; four living – William, born Jan. 22, 1847, who married Miss Angeline Buley in 1865; Lucinda (now Mrs. Isaiah Murphy), born June 19, 1849; Henry L., born Nov. 13, 1854, who married Miss Amanda Gilbert July, 1877; Neety (now Mrs. Wm. H. Goodman), born Sept. 26, 1857; three deceased-Milton, born Dec. 2, 1844, died Jan. 8, 1848; Nancy, born Oct. 10, 1851, died April 2, 1852, and Amanda, born Feb. 9, 1853, died March...

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Biographical Sketch of Elisha Linder

Elisha Linder, farmer; P. O. Mattoon; was born in Hardin Co., Ky., Aug. 16, 1807; his early life was passed upon the farm, and his education was such as the schools of those days afforded; when less than seven years of age, He lost his father, and being the oldest of the family, he soon became the head; his father was a man of energy and thrift, and left the family well provided for; in 1829, young Linder came West, to Illinois, and prospected the county; remaining two months, he returned to Kentucky, and in January, 1831, came again to Illinois; in October following, he moved his mother and family-a brother and two sisters-and located near where he now resides; on arriving at what was to be their future home, they possessed, in actual cash, $2.50, just enough to purchase half a barrel of salt; he bought a few head of horses, cattle and a flock of sheep; he was first to introduce sheep into this section of country; his first purchase was forty acres, slightly improved; he has owned at one time 2,000 acres of land, and at present owns about 1,200 acres; in almost every undertaking, he has been very successful. He was married in April, 1839, to Rebecca Sawyer, a native of Kentucky; her father, John Sawyer, was one of the early pioneers of this section;...

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Biographical Sketch of Thomas Hart

Thomas Hart, farmer; P. O. Paradise is the son of Miles H. and Catharine C. Hart, of Coles Co.; was born in Hardin Co., Ky., Sept. 5, 1824; moved to Coles Co. with his parents March 12, 1826; was Assessor, School Trustee, Overseer of the Poor and Road Overseer. Was married to Vianna Sexson, of Coles Co., March 2, 1851; names of children: Mary E., Hallie B.; deceased-Annie Hart. His father, Miles Hart, was born in North Carolina July 24, 1796; was married to Catharine C. Yocum, of Kentucky, and moved to Wayne Co., Ill., and then to Coles Co.; names of children – boys, Thomas, Joseph B., John D., Ambrosa; girls, Eliza A., Martha P., Mary H., Fanny M.; deceased, Joseph B. (died in Paradise, Coles Co., Jan. 26, 1874); all living in this county with the exception of Mary H., and she now lives in Harrison Co.,...

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Biographical Sketch of Benjamin D. Hamblen

Benjamin D. Hamblen, farmer; P. O. Etna; is the son of Francis and Martha B. Hamblen; was born in Mt. Pleasant, Hardin Co., Ky., March 17, 1840; moved with his parents Dec. 24, 1852, to Moultrie Co., and then to Coles Co., March 13, 1868; is the owner of 120 acres of land, valued at or near $5,000; was Justice of the Peace five years; also School Director and Road Overseer. Was married to Sarah M. Newport, the daughter of Benjamin and Ellen Newport, of Coles Co., Ill.; names of children – boys, Henry F. (born Oct. 3, 1870); girls, Nellie M. (born Dec. 28, 1871), Rossa M. (born Dec. 6, 1873); deceased-boys, Claude (died Aug. 4, 1876). He was in the late war; served as a Duty Sergeant of Co. C, 10th I. V. C.; his father, Francis Hamblen, died Oct. 27, 1877; his mother died Nov. 12,...

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Biographical Sketch of Thomas N. Cofer

Thomas N. Cofer, farmer and stock-raiser; P. O. Arcola; the subject of this sketch was born in Hardin Co., Ky., July 20, 1839. He married Miss Rachel E. Combs Nov. 23, 1870; she was born in Clarke Co., Ind., July 29, 1851; they have three children, viz., Thomas N., Jr., William E. and John C. He lived in Kentucky until the spring of 1854, when, with his parents he came to Illinois and settled in Coles (now Douglas) Co., at Rural Retreat, where they lived about three years; he then moved to a farm near by, where he remained until 1870, when he moved to his present place, and has lived here since. He owns 320 acres, which he has earned by his own labor and management; he is a son of Col. John Cofer, whose sketch will be found in this...

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Hardin County, Kentucky Census Records

1790 Hardin County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Hardin County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Hardin County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Hardin County USGenWeb Archives Project Census Index Transcribers Notes Census Enumerations Part 1 Census Enumerations Part 2 Census Enumerations Part 3 Census Enumerations Part 4 Hosted at RootsWeb Transcribers Notes Census Transcription File 1 of 4 Census Transcription File 2 of 4 Census Transcription File 3 of 4 Census Transcription File 4 of 4 Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Hardin County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1820 Hardin County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Hardin County USGenWeb Archives Project Census Index Transcriber’s Notes Census Enumerations Part 1 Census Enumerations Part 2 Census Enumerations Part 3 Census Enumerations Part 4 Hosted at RootsWeb Transcriber’s Notes Census Transcription File 1 of 3 Census Transcription File 2 of 3 Census Transcription File 3 of 3 Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 Hardin County, Kentucky...

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