Location: Hampshire County MA

Wright Family of Boston, MA

WRIGHT. The family of this name is an early Boston family, which through marriage is allied with some of the historic families of New England, among them those of Adams, Winslow and Wentworth. We give herewith an outline of the earlier generations, beginning with the first ancestor in this country. (I) Richard Wright, born about 1607, died in Plymouth, Mass., June 9, 1691. In 1644 he married Hester Cook, and they had children: Adam, Esther and Mary. (II) Adam Wright, born about 1644, died Sept. 20, 1724. He was twice married, having by his first wife, Sarah (Soule), two children, John and Isaac, and by his second wife, Mehitable (Barrows), four children, Samuel, Moses, James and Nathan. (III) Samuel Wright, born about 1700, died Jan. 5, 1773. He was of Plympton. By his wife, Anna (Tillson), born about 1704, died Nov. 16, 1792, he had children as follows: Ruth, born Aug. 12, 1723; Ruth (2), March 1, 1725; Sarah, June 3, 1726 (married a Hall); Samuel, Oct. 6, 1728; Edmund, Oct. 28, 1730; Jacob, April 17, 1733; Lydia, Sept. 22, 1736. (IV) Jacob Wright, of Plympton, born April 17, 1733, son of Samuel and Anna (Tillson) Wright, died March 30, 1818. He married Deborah Torrey, of Weymouth, born Sept. 18, 1731, died Dec. 31, 1820. Children: Ann, born Jan. 1, 1753; Zadoc, April 17, 1754 (served in the Revolutionary...

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Stockbridge School of Agriculture Yearbooks 1921-2002

The Stockbridge School of Agriculture was founded as part of the Massachusetts Agricultural College (now University of Massachusetts Amherst) in 1918. The University of Massachusetts at Amherst digitized 73 of the yearbooks covering the years of 1921-2002. The yearbook during this period was known as the “Shorthorn” and “Stosag”. Yearbooks provide a window into student life. From sports teams to clubs, fashions to hairstyles, these volumes document the changing attitudes and culture of college students year by year.

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Narrative of the Captivity of Quintin Stockwell – Indian Captivities

Quintin Stockwell, Who was taken at Deerfield, in Massachusetts, by a Party of Inland Indians, in the Year 1677; Communicated in his own Words, and Originally Published by the Eminent Dr. Increase Mather, in the Year 1684. A particular account of the interruption in which Stockwell and others fell into the hands of the Indians will be found in the Book of the Indians, Book iii, p. 97 and 98. Out of twenty-four at that time killed and taken, we learn the names only of these; Quintin Stockwell, John Root, Sergeant Plimpton, Benjamin Stebbins, his wife, Benjamin Waite, and Samuel Russell. Plimpton was burnt in their cruel manner, Root was killed, and Stebbins escaped. Of the others I have learned nothing. In the year 1677, September the 19th, between sunset and dark, the Indians came upon us. I and another man, being together, we ran away at the outcry the Indians made, shouting and shooting at some others of the English that were hard by. We took a swamp that was at hand for our refuge; the enemy espying us so near them, run after us, and shot many guns at us; three guns were discharged upon me, the enemy being within three rods of me, besides many others before that. Being in this swamp, which was miry, I slumped in and fell down, whereupon one of the enemy...

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Biography of Edmund Silver

Edmund Silver, a thriving farmer of Boscawen, N.H., was born in Bow, this State, September 10, 1834. His parents, Edmund and Sallie (Dow) Silver, who resided in Bow for the greater part of their lives, died when their son Edmund was quite young. They had nine children-Lewis, Laura, Cyrene, Leonard, Gideon, Sullivan, Daniel, Edmund, and George. Lewis died in March, 1897. Daniel is engaged in farming in Salisbury, N.H. George is in Penacook; and the others, except Edmund, the subject of our sketch, are deceased. Edmund Silver received his education in the district schools, remaining at home with his parents until he was seven years of age. He then went to Ware, Mass., where he was employed on a farm; and he was similarly engaged in other towns for a few years, returning subsequently to Bow. At the age of twenty he went to Canterbury, remaining there three and a half years. He then spent three years in Warner, N.H., afterward removing to Webster, in which place he was engaged in farming for about thirty-five years. Subsequently, coming to Boscawen, he purchased his present farm, then known as the Ferrin farm. It contains about sixty-five acres, most of which is under cultivation. Besides general farming he carries on a milk business. He also owns the farm at Webster where he formerly lived, which contains forty-five acres. On November 2,...

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Biography of Josiah Edwards Dwight

Josiah Edwards Dwight, a member of the noted old New England family to which President Timothy Dwight of Yale College belonged, is one of the leading Concord, N.H. Born in Belchertown, Mass., May 17, 1839, son of Harrison D. and Sophia (Cook) Dwight, he traces his lineage through his mother, also, back to the early days of the New England colonies. On the paternal side his first ancestor to settle in this country was John Dwight, who came from Dedham, England, in 1634, and located in the part of Massachusetts afterward named Dedham. He was the second man of wealth in the settlement, and with eighteen others owned the land comprising later the town of Dedham and about nine surrounding towns. His daughter Mary was the first white child born in the town of Dedham. John Dwight’s son Timothy, from whom the subject of this sketch is directly descended, was born in Dedham, England, in 1629. He inherited the estate and virtues of his father, and was one of the prominent men of his day. A sturdy soldier, he was cornet of a troop in his younger days, and was afterward commander of a company of foot, and is commonly alluded to as Captain Timothy Dwight. His title was no empty honor, for he was engaged in ten expeditions against the Indians; and in 1660 he was one of...

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Genealogy of Edward Baker of Saugus Massachusetts

G151 EDWARD BAKER: farmer; settled on the south side of “Baker’s Hill”, Saugus (then Lynn), Mass., 1630; undoubtedly came in the fleet under Gov. Winthrop; admitted a Freeman, 1638; m. Joan (d. 1693); d. 1687. Joseph: m. Ruth Holton, 1662; he and eldest son, Joseph, killed by Indians, 1675; had five ch. John: b. 1645; m. Abigail Fisher; settled in Dedham; d. 1719. Samuel: b. 1673; m. Mary Aspinwall; inherited lands in Northampton; d. 1717. Ch.: Daniel (b. 1717; m. Elizabeth Allis; d. 1798). John: b. 1677; m. Sarah Whiting; d. 1768. Timothy: b. 1708; m. Abigail Pond; d. 1786. Jabez: m. Hannah Morse. Jabez: b. 1771; m. Abigail Burridge; d. 1854. Jabez: b. 1799; m. Ann Burridge. Ch.: George Warren (b. 1824). Nathaniel: settled in Belchertown, Mass. Ch.: Hinsdale, Leonard (settled in N. Y.), Ira, Ivers, Hadassah. Timothy: b. 1745; m. Cynthia Onion; assisted in building Forts in South Boston during the Revolutionary War; d. 1831. Aaron: b. 1778; m. (1), Hannah Gay Baker; m. (2), Roxy Whiting; capt. of a Militia Company in West Dedham; d. 1856. Lusher Gay: b. 1807; m. Elizabeth P. Sanford. Ch.: George Ellis (b. 1834; m. Ellen Smith), Lusher Gay (b. 1850). Samuel Whiting: b. 1817; m. Rachel Cole. Charles Richmond: b. 1841; m. Sarah E. Smith. Ch.: Frederick Augustus (b.1856). Aaron W.: b. 1845. Edwin Whiting: b. 1849. Eustis: b. 1824;...

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John Wright Genealogy

John Wright m. Mary and res. Dunstable. Benjamin2 Wright, son of John1, b. at Dunstable, d. Milford, N. H., res. at Mile Slip (afterwards Milford); m. Betsey Adams of Dunstable (now Nashua). Of their eleven children eight were b. in Mile Slip, and the last three in Milford: Benjamin, b. May 20, 1775; d. Sept. 19, 1777. Benjamin; Betsey; Ira; Joel, 1, b. Jan. 26, 1784; Oliver; Sally; Mary; Lydia; Nehemiah and Gratia. Joel3 Wright, son of Benjamin2, was the fifth minister and third settled pastor of the First Cong. Church of S. See page 409. According to the Milford, N. H. records, he was b. Jan. 26, other authorities give it Jan. 27, 1784. Res. in the old Muzzey house while in S.; he was an invalid the last ten years of his life and died at South Hadley, Mass., June 8, 1859; m. Lucy W. Grosvenor, b. Paxton, Mass., Dec. 8, 1785; d. Fond DuLac, Wis., Oct. 18, 1861; dau. of Rev. Daniel and Deborah (Hall) Grosvenor of Petersham, Mass. Ch.: Daniel Grosvenor4, b. Leverett, Mass., Sept. 22, 1813, d. in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Dec. 29, 1897; m. May 25, 1836, Aletta Van Brunt; dau. of Jeremiah of New Utrecht, L. I. In Sullivan he lived where Mrs. Amos Wardwell recently lived. He was then a farmer. He afterwards studied for the ministry, took orders in the...

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel C. Pomeroy

Samuel C. Pomeroy, one of the leaders of Kansas in the times of her free-state travail whose political ambition overleaped his sense of honor, was born in Southampton, Massachusetts, January 3, 1816. When a young man be became strongly imbued with antislavery sentiments. He happened to be present when President Pierce signed the Kansas-Nebraska bill, and is said to have remarked to the nation’s chief executive: “Your victory is but an adjournment of the question from the halls of legislation at Washington to the open prairies of the Freedom-loving West, and there, sir, we shall beat you.” So earnest was Mr. Pomeroy in the matter that in August, 1854, he started for Kansas with a colony of 200 emigrants pledged to the free-state cause. On September 6th they crossed the line at Kansas City, bound for Lawrence, but Pomeroy settled at Atchison. He spent much of his time canvassing the eastern states for the free-state cause in Kansas, and in 1861 was intrusted with a large fund raised for the sufferers by drought. Upon the admission of the state into the Union, in that year, he was elected to the United State Senate and re-elected in 1867. At the republican nominating convention for a third term, before which he was a candidate, Senator A. M. York of Montgumery County denounced Mr. Pomeroy for bribery, and turned over the $7,000...

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Biographical Sketch of Alden, Edmund Kimball

Alden, Edmund Kimball, son of Dr. Ebenezer and Anne (Kimball) Alden, was born in Randolph, Norfolk County, April 11, 1825. He is a lineal descendant in the eighth generation, by two family lines. Of “John” and “Priscilla” of Mayflower fame. After attending the Randolph Academy, he entered Amherst College, where he graduated in 1844; was then a teacher in the Williston Seminary, at Easthampton, for a year, and graduated from the Andover Theological Seminary in 1848, continuing his studies there for a few months as Abbott resident. From 1850 to 1854 Mr. Alden was pastor of the First Church of Yarmouth, Maine; was pastor of the Congregational church at Lenox, from 1854 to 1859; and then became pastor of Phillips Church, Boston, so continuing till 1876. He received from his alma mater, in 1866, the honorary degree of D. D. Mr. Alden was married April 25, 1850, to Maria, daughter of Deacon Gershom and Sarah (Hyde) Hyde, of Bath, Me. He was a trustee for fourteen years of Phillips Academy and the Andover Theological Seminary, resigning this trust in 1881; he has also been a trustee of Amherst College since 1873; he is at present corresponding secretary, home department, of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, having held the office for thirteen...

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Biography of M. Hayward Post, Jr., M. D.

Dr. M. Hayward Post, Jr., who is engaged in medical practice in St. Louis, is a representative of one of the oldest American families, his ancestors having come to the new world on the Mayflower. His grandfather was Rev. Truman Marcellus Post, who is mentioned by a former historian as one of the eminent Missouri preachers of his day. His father was M. Hayward Post, who was a well known physician and a prominent oculist of St. Louis. He served for twenty years as a member of the board of the Missouri School for the Blind and passed away in 1914, at the age of sixty-three years. His brother, Truman A’. Post, was a soldier of the Union army during the Civil war. The mother of Dr. Post of this review bore the maiden name of Mary Lawrence Tyler and she, too, was a representative of one of the old American families that has been in the United States through five or six generations, the family home being maintained for many years in Kentucky. The marriage of Dr. Post and Mary Lawrence Tyler was celebrated in St. Louis in 1883 and to them were born two sons, of whom M. Hayward, born October 5, 1886, is the elder. The younger is Dr. Lawrence Tyler Post, born December 25, 1887, who is practicing in the office with his brother and...

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Biography of Judge John W. McElhinney

For the fourth term Judge John W. McElhinney has been called to the bench of the thirteenth circuit court of Missouri having entered upon the duties of this position in 1901. His course has at all times reflected credit and honor upon tile state that has honored him and he is today numbered among the ablest of Missouri’s jurists, for film decisions have at all times been strictly fair and impartial, and moreover have been the expression of a comprehensive knowledge of tile principles of jurisprudence, combined with ability to apply accurately his principles to tile points in litigation. Judge McElhinney was born February 4, 1851, on the Mason road in Bonhomme township, between Manchester and Creve Coeur, his parents being Alexander and Martha J. (Hibler) McElhinney. It was about the year 1845 that his father removed to St. Louis county, Missouri, from Butler county, Pennsylvania, and here took up the profession of school teaching and also followed carpentering at an early day. Later, however, he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits and subsequently prepared for the bar, devoting his time and attention to law practice in St. Louis and adjoining counties from 1860 until his demise, which occurred July 3. 1985. For almost two years he had survived his wife, who spent leer entire life in St. Louis county and who passed away in December, 1893. The youthful...

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Biography of Hon. Zenas Ferry Moody

HON. Z.F. MOODY. – Zenas Ferry Moody, ex-Governor of the State of Oregon, was born on the 27th of May, 1832, in Granby, Massachusetts. His father was Major Thomas H. Moody. His mother was Hannah M. Ferry, an aunt of ex-Senator T.W. Ferry, of Michigan, formerly vice-president of the United States. Governor Moody comes of good old New England Revolutionary stock, his grandfather, Gideon Moody, having borne arms as a soldier during the Revolutionary war. He has proved himself worthy of his lineage; and the principles which he imbibed on New England soil have been the guide of his whole subsequent life. The sturdy virtues of that stock are too well known to require comment; they have become historical. The public men of New England have led the van in every reform, and have taken a most prominent part in molding all of that history of which the American people are most proud. New England ideas have been infused throughout the whole of our national life; and we have come to expect from men of New England ancestry those sturdy qualities which have contributed so largely to our happiness and prosperity as a people. Mr. Moody’s childhood was spent in Granby. January, 1848, he removed to Chicopee, Massachusetts, where he remained the ensuing three years. On the 14th of March, 1851, he sailed from New York to Oregon by...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles Kingsley Arter

Arter, Charles Kingsley; attorney-at-law; born, Cleveland, April 24, 1876; son of Frank A. and Delia Kingsley Arter; educated, Amherst College, 13. A., 1898; Harvard Law School, 1901; married, Cleveland, Sept. 23, 1902, Grace Denison; issue, Elizabeth and Calvin Kingsley Arter; member of the well-known law firm of Smith, Taft & Arter; at Amherst won Commencement Debate, one of the highest honors to be gained in college; admitted to the bar in Massachusetts, in 1901; immediately afterwards came to Cleve-land and admitted to practice in the Ohio Courts; firm makes a specialty in corporation and banking law in which I have had wide experience, having large financial and corporate clientele; Republican; director American Multigraph Co. and The Hermit Club Co.; member Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity; Chamber of Commerce; Union, Hermit, Nisi Prius...

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Biographical Sketch of Thomas P. Ballard

Ballard, Thomas P.; real estate; born, Canton, O., Apr. 27, 1854; son of Martin and Sophia Ball Ballard; educated, A. B. Amherst College, 1876 and A. M. 1879; married, Columbus, O., Jan. 20, 1886, Isabella Clerk (deceased) ; one son, Clifford B. Ballard; married, Cambridge, Mass., Aug. 29, 1907, Frances Anne Keay; one son, Hyde Whitcomb Ballard; 1877-79, supt. schools Navarre, O.; 1879-80, prin. Unadilla N. Y. Academy; 1880-90, agt. for Ginn & Co. of Boston at Columbus, O.; 1890, admitted as partner of Ginn & Co., 1892-99, Chicago office of Ginn & Co.; 1899-1906, social and settlement worker, Philadelphia; 1906, real estate, Cleveland; 1894-99, trustee Chicago Commons; 1897-99, trustee Cong. City Mission Society, Chicago; 1895-8, trustee Central Cong. Church, Philadelphia; 1913, director Civic League, Cleveland; member Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity; 1886-91, Columbus, O., Club, Chicago; Union League, Congregational, Sunset, Evanston, Amherst, Evans-ton Boat Club; Cleveland City Club; Council of Sociology; member Chamber of Commerce; committee on Municipal Affairs, 1912; vice pres. Cleveland Real Estate Board, 1911; chairman Board of Trustees, 1912, and pres....

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