Location: Halifax County VA

Biographical Sketch of Charles Howard

Charles Howard, of Halifax County, Virginia, married Nancy Lewis, and settled in Warren County, Kentucky. One of their sons, named Joseph, married Malinda Lennox, and settled in Montgomery County, Missouri, in 1818. Their children were Sylvesta, Cynthia E., Elijah, Rachel, Estelle, Cordelia, and Malinda. Mr. Howard’s first wife died, and he was married again to Phoebe Saylor, by whom he had John and George. She also died, and he married a lady named McCormack, by whom he had Greenup, Nancy, and Matilda. He was married the fourth time to Sydney Hall, by whom he had Joseph W. and a daughter. He was married the fifth time to Nancy Bladenburg, but they had no...

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Biographical Sketch of Alexander Harding

Alexander Harding, of Halifax Co., Va., married Mary Hightower, and they had Archibald, Anna, Benjamin, Elizabeth, Mary, and Sally. Mr. Harding died in 1816, and his widow married Josiah Rodgers, and moved to Alabama. Archibald married in Virginia, and settled in Missouri in 1833. Anna married James Anderson, and settled in Montgomery County in 1833. Benjamin served in the war of 1812. He married Mary Nunnelly, of Virginia, and settled in Montgomery County in 1831. They had but one child, who died when nineteen years of...

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Biography of Clement Richardson

Clement Richardson, of Jefferson City, president of the Lincoln Institute, deserves mention as an eminent educator, for his professional work has been not merely instilling knowledge into the minds of pupils but has been broad in its scope, thoughtful in its purposes and human in its tendency. lie has studied the individual and his requirement, has met the needs of the school and has made valuable contributions to literature that has to do with his profession. Mr. Richardson was born June 23. 1878, in Halifax county, Virginia, a son of Leonard and Louise (Barksdale) Richardson. In his youthful days he attended the White Oak Grove country school, but his opportunity to pursue his studies was limited to a brief period each year, as it was necessary that he work in the tobacco fields. He was still quite a young lad when obliged to leave school in Virginia, and later he became mail carrier for the Brow Hill plantation near Paces station. In 1895, however, prompted thereto by a laudable ambition, he made his way to Massachusetts seeking work and with a view to promoting his education. After spending some years in Winchester, Massachusetts, working in a tannery, a glue factory and on a farm, through the help of the Young Men’s Christian Association and the First Baptist church of Winchester, he was able to enter the Dwight L. Moody...

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Biography of William Thomas Rye

The bar of Craig county finds a prominent representative in William Thomas Rye, who since 1908 has followed his profession at Vinita, his ability being demonstrated by the large clientele accorded him. He was born near South Boston, in Halifax county, Virginia, September 2, 1879, and his parents were George J. and Susan (Dewberry) Rye, both natives of Virginia and representatives of old and highly respected families of that state. Prior to the Civil war the father had gone to Mississippi and after the out-break of hostilities he joined a regiment in that state, but after receiving his discharge from the service returned to Virginia. After completing his public school course Mr. Rye attended the Cluster Springs Academy and Hampden Sidney College and then engaged in educational work for a time, going to Amherst, Virginia, where he taught classes in Latin, French and mathematics. Later he was connected with a bank of that city and then resumed his studies, spending the years 1905 and 1906 in the law school of the University of Michigan. In 1907 he taught school at Bardwell, Kentucky, and following his admission to the bar in 1908 he came to Vinita, Oklahoma, where he has since made his home. For four years he was a law partner of Hon. J. S. Davenport, who represented this district in the sixtieth, sixty-first and sixty-second sessions of congress,...

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