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Location: Guilford Connecticut

Establishment of Fort Smith in 1817

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The white population in Arkansas in 1817 had increased to several thousand, whose protection, as well as that of the Cherokee people living in that territory, from the continued hostilities of the Osage, required the establishment of a military post at the western border dividing the white settlements from the Osage. From Saint Louis came further news of threatened hostilities by the Osage near Clermont’s Town, and a report 1Niles Register, (Baltimore) vol. xiii, 176. that Major William Bradford with a detachment of United States riflemen,...

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Hubbard Genealogy

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now George Hubbard George1 Hubbard was first in Watertown, Mass., about 1633; m. Mary Bishop, who d. at Guilford, Conn., Sept. 14, 1675. She was dau. of John and Ann Bishop, who moved to Guilford in 1639, where he, Bishop, was one of the seven prop. of the town, and d. there, February, 1661. On May 6, 1635, permission from the General Court of Massachusetts was granted to the inhabitants of Watertown “to remove themselves to any place they shall think meet to make choice of, provided they still continue under the government.” Among these immigrators was George Hubbard and family and his father-in-law, John Bishop and family. George Hubbard was the representative of Wethersfield, Conn., at the first Colonial General Court, under the Constitution of 1639. He went from Wethersfield and settled at Milford on Long Island, “being assigned Milford Island as his grant. He was one of those persons whose names are hereunto written-who are allowed to be free planters, having for the present, liberty to act in the choice of public officers for the carrying on of public affairs in this plantation. Mr. George Hubbard came from Wethersfield.” Before 1650 he sold Milford Island to Richard Bryan, and moved with his son-in-law John Fowler to Guilford, where his wife’s parents, John and Ann Bishop,...

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Biographical Sketch of Rev. Timothy Collins

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (IV) Rev. Timothy Collins, son of John (3) Collins, was born in Guilford, April 13, 1699, died at Litchfield, Connecticut, in 1776. He graduated from Yale College in 1718. He became minister of the town of Litchfield and owner of one-sixtieth of the town rights. He probably was called through the influence of Deacon John Buell, who came from Lebanon. He was ordained June, 1723, and dismissed in 1752, after which he practiced medicine in Litchfield the remainder of his life. He studied medicine during the ministry. He was chosen justice of the peace in 1753. He married Elizabeth Hyde, January 16, 1723, daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth (Calkins) Hyde, of Lebanon. Children, born in Litchfield: Oliver, March 7, 1724; Anne, August 24, 1725; Charles, August 5, 1727; Lewis, August 8, 1730, died young; Rhoda, May 3, 1731, married four times; Cypriot, March 4. 1733, mentioned elsewhere; Ambrose, March 30, 1737; John, June 1,...

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Biographical Sketch of John Collins

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (II) John (2), son of John (1) Collins, was born in Boston, about 1644. He was also a shoemaker. He removed in 1663 to Middletown, Connecticut, thence to Saybrook, later to Branford and Guilford. He married (first) Mary Trowbridge, who died in 1668; (second), June 3, 1669, Mary (Stephens) Hingnoth, widow of Henry Hingnoth; (third) Dorcas (Swain) Taintor, widow of John Taintor. He died at Branford about 1704. Children: John, born 1665, mentioned elsewhere; Robert, 1667; Mary, married...

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