Location: Groton Connecticut

Biographical Sketch of Capt. Henry E. Morgan

CAPT. HENRY E. MORGAN. – This well-known pioneer of 1849 is a native of Groton, Connecticut, and was born October 30, 1825. He moved with his parents to Meriden, in the same state, residing there until April, 1849, when he set forth for California in a bark via Cape Horn, arriving in San Francisco the following September. A short time afterwards he began a sea-faring life, and for fifteen years sailed the ocean. During that time he entered nearly all the noted foreign ports, and later purchased a vessel of his own and followed a coasting trade. In 1858 he located in Port Townsend, Washington territory, and after quitting the sea began to till the soil, and followed farming for six years. In 1863 he was elected representative from Jefferson county, and ably filled that office for two terms. In 1879 he was appointed inspector of hulls for the Puget sound district. He has invested from time to time in real estate in Port Townsend, and is now one of the largest property owners of the city, and after the buffetings of many years is safely anchored in a happy home, esteemed by his acquaintances and honored by the citizens of the town in which he lives. His family consists of a wife and one...

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Black-Indian History

The first black slaves were introduced into the New World (1501-03) ostensibly to labor in the place of the Indians, who showed themselves ill-suited to enforced tasks and moreover were being exterminated in the Spanish colonies. The Indian-black inter-mixture has proceeded on a larger scale in South America, but not a little has also taken place in various parts of the northern continent. Wood (New England’s Prospect, 77, 1634) tells how some Indians of Massachusetts in 1633, coming across a black in the top of a tree were frightened, surmising that; ‘he was Abamacho, or the devil.” Nevertheless, inter-mixture of Indians and blacks has occurred in New England. About the middle of the 18th century the Indians of Martha’s Vineyard began to intermarry with blacks, the result being that “the mixed race increased in numbers and improved in temperance and industry.” A like inter-mixture with similar a results is reported about the same time from parts of Cape Cod. Among the Mashpee in 1802 very few pure Indians were left, there being a number of mulattoes 1Mass Hist. Soc. Coll., r, 206; iv, 206; ibid., 2d s., iii, 4; cf. Prince in Am. Anthrop., ix, no. 3, 1907. Robert Rantoul in 1833 2Hist. Coll. Essex Inst., xxiv, 81 states that “the Indians are said to be improved by the mixture.” In 1890, W. H. Clark 3Johns Hopk. Univ. Circ.,...

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Pequot Tribe

Pequot Indians (contr. of Paquatauog, ‘destroyers.’- Trumbull). An Algonquian tribe of Connecticut. Before their conquest by the English in 1637 they were the most dreaded of the southern New England tribes. They were originally but one people with the Mohegan, and it is possible that the term Pequot was unknown until applied by the eastern coast Indians to this body of Mohegan invaders, who came down from the interior shortly before the arrival of the English. The division into two distinct tribes seems to have been accomplished by the secession of Uncas, who, in consequence of a dispute with Sassacus, afterward known as the great chief of the Pequot, withdrew into the interior with a small body of followers. This body retained the name of Mohegan, and through the diplomatic management of Uncas acquired such prominence that on the close of the Pequot War their claim to the greater part of the territory formerly subject to Sassacus was recognized by the colonial government. The real territory of the Pequot was a narrow strip of coast in New London County, extending from Niantic River to the Rhode Island boundary, comprising the present towns of New London, Groton, and Stonington. They also extended a few miles into Rhode Island to Wecapaug River until driven out by the Narraganset about 1635. This country had been previously in possession of the Niantic, whom...

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Mohegan Tribe

Mohegan Indians (from ma├»ngan, ‘wolf.’ Trumbull). An Algonquian tribe whose chief seat appears originally to have been on Thames river, Conn., in the north part of New London county. They claimed as their proper country all the territory watered by the Thames and its branches north to within 8 or 10 miles of the Massachusetts line, and by conquest a considerable area extending north and east into Massachusetts and Rhode Island, occupied by the Wabaquasset and Nipmuc. On the west their dominion extended along the coast to East river, near Guilford, Conn. After the destruction of the Pequot in 1637 the Mohegan laid claim to their country and that of the western Nehantic in the south part of New London county. The tribes west of them on Connecticut river, whom they sometimes claimed as subjects, were generally hostile to them, as were also the Narraganset on their east border. The Mohegan seem to have been the eastern branch of that group of closely connected tribes that spread from the vicinity of Narragansett bay to the farther side of the Hudson, but since known to the whites the eastern and western bodies have had no political connection. At the first settlement of New England the Mohegan and Pequot formed but one tribe, under the rule of Sassacus, afterward known as the Pequot chief Uncas, a subordinate chief connected by marriage...

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel Avery

(III) Samuel, son of James and Joanna (Greenslade) Avery, was born at Groton, August 14, 1664, died there, May 1, 1723. He was a large farm owner and most of his life a magistrate. For some time he was captain of the train band, and when the town was legally organized in 1704, he was its moderator. He became the first townsman, at the first town meeting in 1705, and held the position till his death. He married, October 25, 1686, in Swansea, Massachusetts, Susanna, daughter of William and Ann (Humphrey) Palmes, born about 1665, died October 9, 1747. Children: 1. Samuel, born August it, 1687, died August 7, 1714. 2. Jonathan, born January 18, 1689, died June 12, 1761; married Preserved . 3. William, born August 25, 1692, died February 20, 1718. 4. Mary, born January 10, 1695, died in May, 1739 married, June 16, 1720, William Walsworth. 5. Christopher, born February 10, 1697, died January 17, 1768; married, June 25, 1719, Mary Latham. 6. Humphrey, referred to below. 7. Nathan, born January 30, 1702, married Mary . 8. Lucy, born April 17, 1703. John, born September 17, 1705, died September 9, 1792, married Bridget Higgins. 10. Waitstill, born March 27, 1708, married (first), September 18, 1729, Deborah Williams and (second) Margaret Childs. 11. Grace, born June 2,...

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Biographical Sketch of James Avery

(II) James, son of Christopher Avery. the only child of whom there is any record in America, and the founder of the Averys of Groton, was born in England about 1620. He accompanied his father to the Massachusetts Bay Colony, and lived with him for several years in Gloucester, and then removed to New London, Connecticut, where the first entries in the town book are the births of his three eldest children, who were born in Gloucester. He took up many land grants and built the Hive of the Averys “at the head of Poquonnock Plain in the present town of Groton, about one and one-half miles from the River Thames.” He was a prominent public character, was ensign, lieutenant and captain of the train band, deputy to the general court. Indian commissioner and agent, and townsman from 1660 for twenty years. He married, November 10, 1643, Joanna Greenslade, of Boston. Children : 1. Hannah, born October 12, 1644, married, June 20, 1666, Ephraim Miner. 2. James, born December 16, 1646, died August 22, 1748: married, February 18, 1669, Deborah Stallyou. 3. Mary, born February 19, 1648, died February 2, 1708, married, October 28, 1668, Joseph Miner. 4. Thomas, born May 6, 1651: died January 5, 1737; married, October 22, 1677, Hannah Miner. 5. John, born February 10, 1653-54. married, November 26, 1675, Abigail Cheeseborough. 6. Rebecca, born October...

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