Location: Greenfield Massachusetts

Biographical Sketch of Richard Frederick Fuller

RICHARD FREDERICK FULLER was the fourth son. He graduated at Harvard University, 1844, studied law in Greenfield, Mass., afterwards a year at the Harvard Law School, and, having completed his studies in the office of his uncle, Henry H. Fuller, Esq., in Boston, was admitted to the bar on examination in open court, December, 1846, at the age of twenty-two. He became, and continued for two years to be, the law partner of his uncle, and subsequently practiced law with success in Boston. Having been fitted for college, at the age of sixteen he entered a store in Boston, at the solicitation of his family; but mercantile life proving distasteful to him, be relinquished it at the end of one year. By severe application, he in six months made up for this lost year, at the same time keeping pace with the studies of the Sophomore class, and was admitted to college in the middle of the Sophomore year. He graduated the second or third scholar of his class. He died at his country home in Wayland, May 30, 1869. He had a taste for literature, was deeply religious, and an ardent lover of nature. One of his greatest pleasures was to walk in the early morning through woods and fields accompanied by his...

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Biography of Edgar Marvin Graves

EDGAR MARVIN GRAVES, born and reared in the town of Greenfield, is working his way to fame as a business man of this town. More often than otherwise the young man will leave his native hearth to seek his fortune in a larger town or city, when, if he had used his eyes he would have seen opportunity beckoning him at his very door. This was not the case with Edgar M. Graves, however, for he saw opportunities in his own town and made use of them until today he is recognized as the owner of a prosperous electrical business. The Graves family is one of the most ancient in England, and is represented by many men of honor and distinction. of interest to his family and friends is the line of ancestry here traced: Thomas Graves, born in England before 1585, came to New England with his wife, Sarah, and five children, the youngest of whom at that time was about sixteen years of age. They settled in Hartford, Connecticut, where Thomas was a property holder in 1645. Being over sixty years of age, he was exempted from training in the militia. In September, 1661, he moved to Hatfield. His death occurred in November, 1662, and his son, Isaac was appointed administrator of his estate in Massachusetts, and Nathaniel in Connecticut of his marriage were born the following...

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Biographical Sketch of Aiken, David Aiken

Aiken, David, son of Phinehas and Elisabeth (Patterson) Aiken, was born at Bedford, Hillsborough County, N. H., June 7, 1804. His early education was obtained in a common district school and at Pembroke Academy, under Mr. John Vose, and at Phillips Academy, Andover, under Mr. John Adams. He entered Dartmouth College, where he was graduated in 1830. He then studied law with Wells & Alvord at Greenfield, Mass., and was admitted to the Massachusetts bar in 1833; was judge of the court of common pleas from 1856 to ’59. He has been the law partner of Henry Chapman, George Grennell, Davis & Allen, Chester C. Conant, and W. S. B. Hopkins, afterwards with Charles E. Forbes of Northampton. He is now partner with his son, John A. Aiken, but retired from active practice when the State sold its interest in the Troy & Greenfield and Hoosac Tunnel Railroad—he having acted as legal adviser to its manager up to that time, in behalf of the Commonwealth. He was senator from Franklin County in 1874. From the promotion of Judge Wells in 1844 to the present day, with the exception of the period he himself was on the bench, Judge Aiken has been the acknowledged leader of the county bar. He was married in October 1844, to Lydia W., daughter of Col. Spencer and Lydia (Bardwell) Root, who died in November,...

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Biographical Sketch of Allen, Charles

Allen, Charles, son of Sylvester and Harriet (Ripley) Allen, was born in Greenfield, Franklin county, April 17, 1827. He was graduated from Harvard in the class of 1847. He was admitted to the bar in 1850. He practiced law in Greenfield until 1862, and then moved to Boston. He was appointed by Governor John D. Long justice of the supreme judicial court, which position he now holds. Judge Allen was reporter of decisions of the supreme judicial court from 1861 to 1867. He was attorney general of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 1867 to 1872. In 1880 he was appointed one of the commissioner to revise the general statutes. Judge Allen was never...

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Edward E. Todd of Greenfield MA

Edward E. Todd7, (Eli6, Solomon5, James4, James3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born May 23, 1840, married, Aug. 15, 1869, Mary E., daughter of Josiah H. and Elizabeth W. (Russell) Taintor, who was born Oct. 12, 1839. He has devoted much of his life to dealing in lumber and timber land, mostly in or near Franklin County, Mass. He lives now (1913) in Greenfield, Mass. Children: *1621. Rena, b. Aug. 15, 1870. 1622. Ernest, b. July 14, 1873, m. Jan. 1, 1901, Emma Packard. No children. He lived in Greenfield, Mass., where he was a market gardener. 1623. Effie, b. June 15, 1874; she is a nurse. *1624. Mary Ella, b. Jan. 15, 1877. 1625. Allie, b. April 5, 1879, d. Oct. 10,...

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Addison Eli Todd of Elba MN

Addison Eli Todd7, (Eli6, Solomon5, James4, James3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born July 22, 1821, in Charlemont, Mass., died Sept. 14, 1878, married, March 22, 1860, Isabella Ball, who was born Feb. 13, 1833, in Greenfield, Mass., in which town they were married. Mr. Todd lived the first twenty-one years of his life in Charlemont, Mass., assisting his father with the work on the farm. Attaining his majority, he started for the west. Arriving in Michigan, he found employment in the saw mills of Lenawa County for several years. Returning to Massachusetts, he purchased a piece of timber land and began manufacturing “shook,” or dressed staves which were shipped to the West Indies, to be used for barreling sugar. In 1854, he, with his brother, Dexter, journeyed to Minnesota, and was employed for a time in building and operating a large saw mill at St. Anthony, which was the first mill to be built on Rum River. In those days, wooden pins were used to hold the frame of buildings together. Each man on the job was requested to make a pin. As Mr. Todd’s was the best specimen offered, he was given the task of making enough for the mill then in process of construction. In the spring of 1855, Mr. Todd returned to Minnesota, this time making the journey on horseback. Passing through Rochester, where the settlers were just...

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Mabel Juliana Todd Allen of Greenfield MA

ALLEN, Mabel Juliana Todd9, (John R.8, Iru S.7, Justus6, Asa5, Gershom4, Gershom3, Michael2, Christopher1) born Oct. 12, 1878, at the old farm in Northampton, Mass., married July 6, 1905, Amos Mason Allen, who was born in April 1865, in Shelburne, Mass. He is a carriage and automobile painter. In 1920 he was master painter for the Boston and Maine R. R. Co., at their shop in East Deerfield, Mass. They lived in Greenfield, Mass. Children: I. Howard Amos, b. Sept. 19, 1906. II. Agnes Elizabeth, b. May 5, 1908. III. Ethel Irene, b. Aug. 7, 1909. IV. Ruth Evelyn, b. July 7, 1911, d. July 9, 1911. V. Mabel Arlene, b. Sept. 9, 1912. VI. Merrill Francis, b. Dec. 9, 1914. VII. Wayne Root, b. March 8,...

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Leslie Root Todd McCarthy of Greenfield MA

MCCARTHY, Leslie Root Todd9, (John R.8, Iru S.7, Justus6, Asa5, Gershom4, Gershom3, Michael2, Christopher1) born Sept. 11, 1891, in Northampton, Mass., married in Oct. 1911, Frank McCarthy, of Amherst, Mass. In 1920 they were living in Greenfield, Mass., where they were employed at the Wiley and Russell tap and dye plant. Children: I. Shirley Elizabeth, b. Feb. 11, 1912. II. Thelma Olive, b. Feb. 17, 1913, d. Jan. 26, 1919 of Pneumonia which followed an attack of the influenza during the prevailing epidemic that...

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Biography of J. Herbert L. Smead

J. HERBERT L. SMEAD – A well known figure in business circles in Erving, and in social and civic interests in Orange, is J. Herbert L. Smead, whose lifelong activities have been of a practical nature and whose present success as the manager of the Heywood-Wakefield Company in Erving, places him among the thoroughly outstanding men of the day. Mr. Smead is a son of J. Henry Smead, who died, March 17, 1924, at the age of eighty-five years and who throughout the greater part of his lifetime was an employee of the New Bedford Post Office. The mother, Sarah Adell Smead is also now deceased and both these families are prominent ones in this State. J. Herbert L. Smead was born in Greenfield, November 8, 1870. Receiving his education in the local public schools, he removed to New Bedford, Massachusetts, with the family as a lad and there learned the printer’s trade. In 1886, he became a resident of Gardner where for twenty-eight years he was associated with the chair industry. He started as a bookkeeper with the old Heywood plant and remained with the Heywood interests permanently. When he was detailed to his present responsibilities a few years ago, he was serving as treasurer of the Washburn & Heywood Chair Co., and assistant secretary of the parent plant in Gardner. When the Heywood-Wakefield Company established their new...

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Biography of Horace A. Smead

HORACE A. SMEAD – The name of Smead is one of more than passing importance in the western part of Massachusetts, and indeed in this general part of the State it has long been prominent. Mr. Smead has been active in farming interests throughout his entire lifetime and now in the sunset of life he is enjoying well earned leisure. Jonathan Smead, great-great-grandfather of Mr. Smead, was born in 1735 and was a pioneer of Greenfield, locating in that community when the Indians were still frequent visitors to the white settlements. He was active in agricultural pursuits in the vicinity of Greenfield until his death, which occurred in 1814. Jonathan (2) Smead, son of Jonathan Smead, was born in 1773 and reared on the home farm, where he spent his lifetime; he passed away August 25, 1850. He was considered one of the important farmers in this section, owning a three hundred acre farm of rich fertile soil, of which he tilled a very considerable portion. Both he and his wife were members of the Congregational church and were universally esteemed in the community. Jonathan (3) Smead, son of Jonathan (2) Smead, was born on the home farm April 8, 1812, and in 1838 built the present house. He married and settled on the home farm, remaining with his father, and in 1846 the homestead was divided between he...

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Biography of Myron James Farr

MYRON JAMES FARR – The surname of Farr is believed by many to be identical with Farrar, and there is considerable reason for the supposition as persons of both names appear simultaneously in the different localities of New England. It is derived from a Latin word meaning iron and was probably used as a place name before it came into use as a family name. It was first known in England from Gualkeline (or Walkeline) de Ferraris, a Norman of distinction attached to William, Duke of Normandy, before the conquest of England in 1066. From him all of the name in England and America appear to be descended. His son Henry de Ferrars appears on the roll. of the Battle Abbey among the principal companions of the Conqueror, and as the first of the family in England. When the general survey of the realm recorded in the Domesday Book was made in the fourteenth year of the Conqueror’s reign, Henry de Ferrars was one of the commissioners appointed to compile the work. He bore for his arms: Arms-Argent, six horse shoes pierced sable. The first of the name in New England was George Farr, who settled in Salem in 1629, coming with Higginson; was admitted freeman in 1635, settled finally at Lynn, and left eight children. Most of the families spelling the name Farr are descended from Stephen Farr....

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Biography of Clarence Harland Fisher

CLARENCE HARLAND FISHER – One of the Fisher families of Western Massachusetts are originally of Nova Scotian derivation and can be traced back to David Fisher who came from England, settled in Nova Scotia, and had a son John Parr, of whom further. (II) John Parr Fisher, son of David Fisher, appears to have been the first white child born in Stodick, Nova Scotia. His wife’s name was Agnes and they had ten children: George, of whom further; Betsy, Robert, Martha, Nancy, Samuel, John C., William, Thomas, Hannah. (III) George Fisher, son of John Parr Fisher, born in Nova Scotia, married May Ann Jenkins, who was born on board a ship. They had five children: Robert, of whom further; Belle, Lizzie, Jessie, and Louis. (IV) Robert Fisher, son of George Fisher, was a native of Halifax, Nova Scotia, where he was born January 6, 1846, and died in Greenfield, October 13, 1918. He was a chairmaker by trade, working for one company in Gardner for thirty years and for another concern for five years. Later he was connected in business with his son George in Greenfield and in South Deerfield. He was a member of the Grange, and at one time also held membership in the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He was the husband of Lizzie E. Baker, a native of Baldwinsville, died February 8, 1923, who was...

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