Location: Green Bay Wisconsin

Chief Pontiac of the Ottawa’s

Immediately after the peace of 1763 all the French forts in the west as far as Green Bay were garrisoned with English troops; and the Indians now began to realize, but too late, what they had long apprehended the selfish designs of both French and English threatening destruction, if not utter annihilation, to their entire race. These apprehensions brought upon the theatre of Indian warfare, at that period of time, the most remarkable Indian in the annals of history, Pontiac, the chief of the Ottawa’s and the principal sachem of the Algonquin Confederacy. He was not only distinguished for...

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Early Exploration and Native Americans

De Soto and his band gave to the Choctaws at Moma Binah and the Chickasaws at Chikasahha their first lesson in the white man’s modus operandi to civilize and Christianize North American Indians; so has the same lesson been continued to be given to that unfortunate people by his white successors from that day to this, all over this continent, but which to them, was as the tones of an alarm-bell at midnight. And one hundred and twenty-three years have passed since our forefathers declared all men of every nationality to be free and equal on the soil of the North American continent then under their jurisdiction, except the Africans whom they held in slavery, and the Native Americans against whom they decreed absolute extermination because they could not also enslave them; to prove which, they at once began to hold out flattering-inducements to the so-called oppressed people of all climes under the sun, to come to free America and assist them to oppress and kill off the Native Americans and in partnership take their lands and country, as this was more in accordance with their lust of wealth and speedy self-aggrandizement than the imagined slow process of educating, civilizing and Christianizing them, a work too con descending, too humiliating; and to demonstrate that it has been a grand and glorious success, we now point with vaunting pride and haughty...

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Narrative of Angelique Langlade

The concluding narrative of these personal recollections is that of Angelique Langlade, still living in Penetanguishene at an advanced age, and the last survivor but one of a somewhat noted family. Her command of English is very limited, but her mixed dialect so picturesque and pointed, that I am constrained to present it almost verbatim, in her own simple but expressive style, with apologies to several writers of dialect literature. Ma name, Angelique Langlade; born Drummon Islan; me Chippawa half-breed; ma mudder, Josephine Ah-quah-dah, Chippawa squaw, Yankee tribe; ma fadder, Charles Langlade, French half-breed, hees born Mackinaw, an move Drummon Islan wid Breeteesh. I no spik good Eengleesh ver well. I not know how old I be – ha-a – I no chicken – me. I tink bout seven, ten, mebbe tirteen year ole when we come Pentang. Mebbe some day God tell me how ole I be when I die. Ma fadder, mudder, Charlie, Louie, Pierre, two Marguerites, Angelique, dats me, an Delede, all come in big bateau from Nort shore. Priess mak mistak an baptise two Marguerites. Katrine born Pentang. All dead but two, Delede (Mrs. Precourt) an me – dat’s Angelique. We come Gordon’s pinte; mak wigwam cedar bark, stay dare leetle tam; wait for land, den come ware McAvela’s place on de hill, an leeve dare lang, lang tam. 1The old Langlade mansion and original block...

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Treaty of July 29, 1829

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Prairie du Chien, in the Territory of Michigan, between the United States of America, by their Commissioners, General John McNeil, Colonel Pierre Menard, and Caleb Atwater, Esq. and the United Nations of Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatamie Indians, of the waters of the Illinois, Milwaukee, and Manitoouck Rivers. Article 1. The aforesaid nations of Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatamie Indians, do hereby cede to the United States aforesaid, all the lands comprehended within the following limits, to wit: Beginning at the Winnebago Village, on Rock river, forty miles from its mouth, and running thence down the Rock river, to a line which runs due west from the most southern bend of Lake Michigan to the Mississippi river, and with that line to the Mississippi river opposite to Rock Island; thence, up that river, to the United States’ reservation at the mouth of the Ouisconsin; thence, with the south and east lines of said reservation, to the Ouisconsin river; thence, southerly, passing the heads of the small streams emptying into the Mississippi, to the Rock River aforesaid, at the Winnebago Village, the place of beginning. And, also, one other tract of land, described as follows, to wit: Beginning on the Western Shore of Lake Michigan, at the northeast corner of the field of Antoine Ouitmette, who lives near Gross Pointe, about twelve miles north...

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Menominee Indians

Menominee Indians were located on and near the Menominee River, Wisconsin, and in Michigan on or about the present location of Mackinac. The Menominee belonged to the Algonquian linguistic family and to the same section as the Cree and Foxes.

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Biography of H. A. Hansen

H.A. HANSEN. – Among the enterprising and industrious agriculturists of Union county, mention should be made of the gentleman, whose name initiates this paragraph, since his energy and ability have been manifest to all and since he has distinguished himself by his faithfulness and success that he has attained in tilling the soil and in raising stock. He is also popular among his fellows for they have again and again manifested their confidence in him at the polls and have kept him in public office almost continuously for the last decade. The pleasant little Kingdom of Denmark has furnished many thrifty citizens for our country, but none more faithful and deserving than he, who was born there in 1842, the subject of this sketch. At the early age of fourteen years, Mr. Hansen started out for himself and soon was farming and until he was thirty years of age he continued at this industry. At the age last mentioned he left the native land and embarked for the United States, where he made his way to the vicinity of Green Bay, Wisconsin, and engaged there in saw mill work, for two and one-half years. After this period, he went to Kansas, locating in Wilson county, where he worked in a livery stable for five years and farmed for two years and then came to the Sound country in Washington...

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Goebel, John P. – Obituary

John Peter Goebel of Baldwin, Kansas, brother of Tony Goebel, of Enterprise, passed away in Lawrence, Kansas, March 11, 1957, and his body is being brought to Wallowa for burial. Recitation of Rosary was at 8:30 last evening, March 13, at Lawrence, and arrangements have been made by the Booth-Bollman funeral home for requiem mass to be offered by Father John Baumgartner at St. Margaret’s Catholic Church in Wallowa Monday, March 18, at 10 a.m. Burial will be in the Catholic section of the Wallowa cemetery. The deceased was born November 17, 1876, in Green Bay, Wisconsin, son of John and Margaret (Schaut) Goebel. For a number of years he lived in Wallowa County and operated the telephone office both in Joseph and Wallowa before going to Kansas. He was a retired farmer. Survivors include, three daughters: Mrs. Gene (Stella) Randel, Mrs. Jack (May) Randel, and Mrs. John (Ethel) Herrington, all of Baldwin Kansas; the brother, Tony Goebel, of Enterprise; two sisters; Mrs. Ralph (Catherine) Haun, of Lostine and Mrs. W. K. (Lena) Graves, of Portland; and five grandchildren. Contributed by: Phyllis...

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Hetrick, Anna Margaretta – Obituary

Anna Margaretta “Maggie” Hetrick, a resident of Wallowa County most of her life, died March 20, 1982, at Valley View Manor in La Grande, one week before her 100th birthday. Born in Green Bay, Wisconsin on March 27, 1882, she was the daughter of Peter and Gertrude Anna Huber Goebel and the oldest of 10 children. The family moved to Wallowa County from Humbolt County, Wisconsin, in 1888. On November 27, 1907, she was married to Calvin Hetrick in Wallowa, and she spent her adult life as a homemaker. Her husband died in 1938. During World War II Mrs. Hetrick served as a “Sky watcher”, a patrol to spot enemy aircraft. Mrs. Hetrick was a member of St. Pius X Catholic Church in Wallowa and of the Alter Society there. She was also a member of the American Legion Auxiliary, Kruse Post. Survivors include her daughter Mrs. Jack (Shirley) Mitts of Alamo, California; brothers Charles and William Goebel, both of Wallowa; a sister Christina Wealty of Enterprise, two grandchildren, two great grandchildren, nieces and nephews. A daughter, Cora Gilsenan, preceded her in death. Rosary was said Tuesday evening, March 23 at the Bollman Chapel. Mass of Christian Burial was offered the next day by the Rev. Leo Eckerle at St. Pius X Church. Organist for the service was Rita Haun. Pallbearers were Bud and Joe Haun, Leo and Ron...

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Bailey, Hattie Sadie Anderson – Obituary

Funeral services for Hattie Sadie Bailey, 2432 11th Street, 79, were conducted April 26, at the Beatty Chapel. The pastor Joe Jewell officiated with interment following in the family plot at Mt. Hope Cemetery. Mrs. Bailey passed away on Saturday, April 23rd at the Blue Mountain Nursing Home in Prairie City, Oregon after an extended illness. Mrs. Bailey was born on August 19th, 1886, at Green Bay, Wisconsin, the daughter of Hans and Olga Anderson. She came to Baker in 1909 and had lived here since that time with the exception of the past year which she had lived with her daughter near Bates. She was married to George E. Bailey in Baker on May 20, 1917. Mr. Bailey preceded her in death on February 22, 1965. She is survived by one daughter, Elizabeth Keller of Baker; one granddaughter, Ann Elizabeth Keller of Baker and one niece, Violet Irwin of Burke, Idaho. She was a member of Neighbors of Woodcraft Lodge of Baker, Oregon. Record-Courier, Baker City, Oregon, April 28, 1966 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Sauk Tribe

Sauk Indians, Sac Indians, Sac Tribe ( Osā’kiwŭg, ‘people of the outlet,’ or, possibly, ‘people of the yellow earth,’ in contradistinction from the Muskwakiwuk, ‘Red Earth People’, a name of the Foxes). One of a number of Algonquian tribes whose earliest known habitat was embraced within the eastern peninsula of Michigan, the other tribes being the Potawatomi, the “Nation of the Fork,” and probably the famous Mascoutens and the Foxes. The present name of Saginaw Bay (Sāginā’we’, signifying ‘the country or place of the Sauk’) is apparently derived from the ethnic appellative Sauk. There is presumptive evidence that the Sauk, with the tribes mentioned above, were first known to Europeans under the general ethnic term “Gens de Feu” or that of “Asistagueronon,” the latter being the Huron translation of the specific name Potawatomi, both the terms in question being first recorded by Champlain and Sagard. In 1616 Champlain, while in what is now Ontario, learned from the Tionontati, or Tobacco Nation, that their kindred, the Neutral Nation, aided the Ottawa (Cheueux releuez) in waging war against the Gens de Feu, i. e. ‘People of the Fire,’ and that the Ottawa carried on a warfare against “another nation of savages who were called Asistagueronon, which is to say, ‘People of the Place of the Fire,”‘ who were distant from the Ottawa 10 days’ journey; and lastly, in more fully describing...

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1838 Oneida Indian Census

We, the undersigned Chiefs and Head Men of the Orchard Party of Oneida Indians residing at Green Bay, Wisconsin Territory, do hereby certify that the above and foregoing lists, is a just and true Census and enumeration of the number of persons belonging to said party, that is to say, Fifty-three (53) men, Fifty-two (52) women, and One hundred and one (101) children, making a total of Two hundred and six (206) souls, and that the same was taken by H. S. Baird, U. S. Commissioner, in open council, in our presence, at Duck Creek, on the 15th day of November, A. D. 1838. Jacob Cornelius Thomas Lodwick X (his mark) Isaac Johnson X (his mark) John Cooper X (his mark) John Cornelius X (his mark). 1838 Census of the Oneida Orchard Party NumberNameMenWomenChildrenTotal 1 Antony, Susan 3 3 5 11 2 Broad, Thomas 1 1 3 5 3 Cooper, John 2 1 3 4 Cornelius, Jacob Jr. 1 1 1 3 5 Cooper, Peter 1 1 1 3 6 Christian, Polly 1 5 6 7 Cornelius, Hannah 1 2 4 7 8 Cornelius, John 1 1 4 6 9 Cornelius, Jacob 1 2 7 10 10 Cornelius, Moses 1 1 11 Cornelius, Thomas 1 1 3 5 12 Cornelius, William 4 4 6 14 13 Doxtater, Jane 1 3 4 14 Denny, Hannah 1 3 4 15 Day,...

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