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Location: Grande Ronde Reservation

Chepenafa Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Chepenafa Indians. A Kalapooian tribe, some times regarded as a subdivision of the Lakmiut, formerly residing at the forks of St Marys creek, near Corvallis, Oregon. They are now on Grande Ronde reservation, being officially known as Marys River Indians, and number about...

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Lakmiut Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Lakmiut Indians. A Kalapooian tribe formerly residing on a river of the same name, a western tributary of the Willamette, in Oregon.  They are now on Grande Ronde Reservation, where they were officially stated to number 28 in 1905.  They are steadily decreasing.  The following were Lakmiut bands as ascertained by Gatschet in 1877; Ampalamuyu, Chantkaip, Chepenafa, Mohawk, Tsalakmiut, Tsampiak, Tsantatawa and...

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Skoton Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Skoton Indians. A tribe or two tribes (Chasta and Skoton) formerly living on or near Rogue River, Oregon, perhaps the Chastacosta or the Sestikustun 1Dorsey in Journal of American Folklore, III, 235, 1890 . There were 36 on Grande Ronde res. and 166 on Siletz reservation, Oregon, in 1875. Footnotes:   [ + ] 1. ↩ Dorsey in Journal of American Folklore, III, 235,...

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Santiam Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Santiam Indians. A Kalapooian tribe formerly residing on the river of the same name, an east tributary of the Willamette, in Oregon.  They are now on Grande Ronde Reservation, where they numbered 23 in 1906.  In 1909 the number officially reported was only 5, the remainder evidently having received patents for their lands and became citizens.  In 1877 Gatschet was able to learn of 4 bands, Chamifu, Chanchampeneau, Chanchantu and Chantkaip, which had formerly existed in the...

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Molala Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Molala Indians. A Waiilatpuan tribe forming the western division of that family. Little is known of their history. When first met with they resided in the Cascade range between Mts. Hood and Scott and on the west slope, in Washington and Oregon. The Cayuse have a tradition that the Molala formerly dwelt with them south of Columbia river and became separated and driven westward in their wars with hostile tribes. Their dialect, while related, is quite distinct from that of the Cayuse, and the separation probably took place in remote times. The name Molala is derived from that of a Creek in Willamette Valley, Oregon, south of Oregon City. A band of these Indians drove out the original inhabitants and occupied their land. Subsequently the name was extended to all the bands. The present status of the tribe is not certain. In 1849 it was estimated to number 100; in 1877 Gatschet found several families living on the Grande Ronde Reservation, Oregon, and in 1881 there were said to be about 20 individuals living in the mountains west of Klamath Lake. Those on the Grande Ronde Reservation are not officially enumerated, but are regarded as absorbed by the other tribes with whom they live. With regard to the rest nothing is known. It is probable, however,...

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Shasta Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Shasta Indians (from Sǔsti’ka, apparently the mane of a well known Indian tribe living about 1840 near the site of Yreka).  A group of small tribes or divisions forming the Shastan linguistic family of north California and formerly extending into Oregon.  The area occupied by the Shasta is quite irregular, and consists of one main and three subsidiary areas.  The main body, comprising the Iruwaitsu, Kammatwa, Katiru, and Kikatsik, with whom there was little diversity in language, occupied Klamath river from Klamath Hot Springs to Happy Camp, the north half of Shasta valley, the whole of Scott valley, and the upper part of the south part of Salmon river. During the last hundred years, at least, they inhabited also the valley of Stewart river in Oregon from its source to the junction of Rogue river. The three subsidiary groups, consisting of the Konomihu, New River Indians, and Okwanuchu, occupied the forks of the Salmon, the head of New river, and McCloud and upper Sacramento rivers and Squaw creek. These subsidiary groups are now practically extinct. For the distribution of the component divisions see under their respective name, The culture and customs of the Shasta seem to have been much the same throughout this area, but linguistically they were divided into four groups speaking divergent dialects. Little...

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Atfalati Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Atfalati (Atfalati). A division of the Kalapooian family whose earliest seats, so far as can be ascertained, were the plains of the same name, the hills about Forest Grove, and the shores and vicinity of Wappato lake, Oregon; and they are said to have extended as far as the site of Portland. They are now on Grande Ronde Reservation and number about 20. The Atfalati have long given up their native customs and little is known of their mode of life. Their language, however, has been studied by Gatschet, and our chief knowledge of the Kalapooian tongue is from this dialect. The following were the Atfalati bands as ascertained by Gatschet in 1877: Chachanim Chachemewa Chachif Chachimahiyuk Chachimewa Chachokwith Chaehambitmanchal Chagindueftei Chahelim Chakeipi Chakutpaliu Chalal Chalawai Chamampit Chapanaghtin Chapokele Chapungathpi Chatagshish Chatakuin Chatamnei Chatilkuei Chawayed...

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Biography of William Rice Dunbar

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now W.R. DUNBAR. – The mold in which a place is first cast is a great determining force in its future development. A quarter of a city which begins with mean buildings invites a class of neglectful or impecunious residents, and seldom outgrows its tendency towards squalor. The new settlers which come into a thriftless community sink more easily to the habits of their neighbors before them than they succeed in inciting those lax individuals to more industrious methods. On the other hand, also, thrift, vigor, a high level of public spirit and morality, leave a stamp which sets the tone and fashion of a city or neighborhood for many years. It is with peculiar satisfaction, therefore, that we find places like Goldendale which, from their very incipiency, have admitted nothing but strictly honorable pursuits, and have maintained a vigorous sentiment in favor of only the best things. These places become the augury of a high-minded generation in the future. William Rice Dunbar, the subject of this sketch, is one of the men who have thus set the character of Goldendale. He is a man popularly known throughout the Northwest as a sterling worker in the cause of temperance. as a lecturer on this subject, as an organizer of lodges of Good Templars, and as a prominent...

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