Location: Granby Connecticut

Biography of Norman M. Ruick

This distinguished practitioner at the bar of Idaho has been connected with the leading interests of the state for some years, and in all the relations of life he has commanded the respect and confidence of his fellow men by his fidelity to duty and his devotion to the interests entrusted to his care. He comes from the far east, being a native of Connecticut. His birth occurred in Granby, that state, on the 4th of October, 1854, and his ancestry includes both Irish and Puritan stock. His paternal great-grandfather, a native of the Emerald Isle, emigrated to the New World and took up his residence in Hartford County, Connecticut, where he resided for many years. When the colonies attempted to throw off the yoke of British tyranny, he joined the army and valiantly fought in the war which gave to the nation her independence. The grandfather of our subject, William Ruick, Sr., and the father, who also bore the name of William, were both born in Granby, Connecticut, the latter on the l0th of July, 1822. He was a carriage-maker by trade and followed that pursuit in order to gain a livelihood for his family. He married Miss Temperance C. Hutchinson, a native of Mansfield, Connecticut, and a representative of one of the old Puritan families of New England. The Ruick family for several generations had been connected...

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Ambrose Todd of Huntington CT

Ambrose Todd6, (Jonah5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Dec. 7, 1764, died July 25, 1809, married Lavinia, daughter of Rev. Dr. Samuel and Lavinia Jarvis of Cheshire, who was born Oct. 5, 1760, died Oct. 26, 1841. Mr. Todd graduated from Yale College in 1786. He was an Episcopal clergyman, having been ordained Deacon by Bishop Seabury of Connecticut, June 1, 1789. He was rector at Simsbury, Granby and Huntington, Conn., where he died and was buried. The inscription on his Tombstone in Huntington is as follows: “This Monument is erected by the Episcopal Society as a Testimony of Respect and Esteem towards him their clergyman for his Piety and Zeal as a Preacher and his benevolence and goodwill as a man”. Children: 648. Martha Peters, b. Sept. 17, 1789, d. Oct. 13, 1808. 649. Lavinia Harrison, b. April 29, 1791, d. July 25, 1810. *650. Ambrose Seymour, b. Dec. 6, 1798. *651. Charles Jarvis, b. June 26, 1800. 652. William King, b. May 28,...

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Biographical Sketch of Captain Samuel Hayes

(III) Captain Samuel (2), son of Samuel (1) and Elizabeth (Willcockson) Hayes, was born in Simsbury, March 26, 1730, died in Granby, December 25, 1801. In the Simsbury records he is designated captain. In 1753 he erected a substantial dwelling-house at Bushy Hill, two miles west of Salmon Brook, which he and his descendants occupied for nearly a century. He was a selectman of Simsbury, 1774, and of Granby at its organization, 1786; represented Simsbury in the general assembly, 1778; served as deacon of the church at Salmon Brook from 1786 to ’80. He possessed superior physical strength, excelled in all athletic sports and was one of the most prominent and highly respected citizens of his day. In 1750 he married Rosanna, eldest daughter of Judah and Hannah (Buttolph) Holcombe, of Simsbury, and a descendant in the fifth generation of Thomas Buttolph, who landed in Boston from the “Abigail, ” 1635. Rosanna was born in Simsbury, June 24, 1732, and died in Granby, November 8, 1814. Children : 1. Rosanna, born March 6, 1751 ; died in 1770; married Benjamin Hayes, her cousin. 2. Seth, born June 2, 1753. 3. Theodosia, April 16, 1757; died at Delaware, Ohio, 1834; married, at Granby, General Chauncey Pettibone, son of Colonel Ozias’ Pettibone. 4. Samuel, born May 20, 1759. 5. Temperance, December 14, 1761 ; died in Connecticut, 1787; married Luther Foote....

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel Hayes

(II) Samuel, son of George and Abigail (Dibble) Hayes, was born in Simsbury. 1699. He was granted sixty acres of land in Simsbury, 1723; was on church covenant with wife in 1739, and served as tythingman in 1751. He must have lived to an unusually advanced age, as there is on record at Granby a deed, executed March 7, 1787, in which he conveys property to his son Silas. He married, in Simsbury, July 16. 1719, Elizabeth Willcockson (Wilcox), probably a daughter of Samuel Willcockson, of Meadow Plain, Simsbury, granddaughter of Sergeant Samuel Willcockson and great-granddaughter of William Willcockson. of St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England, who arrived at Boston in the “Planter, ” 1635. Children of Samuel and Elizabeth Hayes : 1. Lydia. horn January 18, 1720. 2. Elizabeth, October 17, 1721 ; married, March 20, 1740, Joseph Gillett, of Simsbury. 3. Abigail, born November 3, 1723; married, May 13, 1742, Daniel Hayes, her cousin. 4. Dorcas, born March 15, 1727; married Ephraim, son of Nathaniel and Thankful (Hayes) Holcombe. 5. Samuel, born March 26, 1730. 6. Ashael, born June 3, 1732. 7. Susanna, November 26, 1735; married Reuben Holcombe. 8. Andrew, born May 29, 1737. 9. Silas, February 28,...

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Biography of Henry N. Clemons

Henry N. Clemons, cashier of the First National Bank of Killingly, was born in Granby, Conn., son of Allen and Catharine Clemons. He was educated in the district school, the Granby Academy, the Suffield Literary Institution and the Williston Seminary, East Hampton, Mass. He began teaching at sixteen years of age, and taught in Hartland, Granby and Hartford. Conn., and Woonsocket and Central Falls, R. I. He was for a while in the office of the commissioner of the school fund in Hartford, Conn. In 1844 he commenced railroading on the New Haven & Northampton road, with the engineer corps. He served as station agent at Farmington and Collinsville, Conn., and was assistant postmaster at the latter place; then ticket agent of the Providence & Worcester road at Providence. In 1855 he commenced banking, as clerk in the Arcade Bank, at Providence, and in 1856 became teller of the Merchants’ Bank, then the redeeming bank for Rhode Island, in the old Suffolk system. In June, 1864, he was elected cashier of the First National Bank of Killingly, Conn., then just organized, which office he now holds, after more than twenty-five years’ service, a period longer than any other cashier in eastern Connecticut. The capital of the bank is $110,000. With its July dividend, 1889, it had paid back to its stockholders $226,600 in dividends. In August, 1864, he was...

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