Location: Geary County KS

Biography of Frank T. Vaughan

Frank T. Vaughan, one of the younger lawyers of Newport, was born May 4, 1864, in Woodstock, Vt., son of Edwin and Elizabeth L. (Tenney) Vaughan. The father, who graduated at the Albany Law School, New York, followed the legal profession, and at the time of his death was Judge of Probate. Edwin Vaughan commenced his law practice in New York City; but in 1859 he removed to Claremont, N.H., and entered into partnership with Colonel Alexander Gardner. In 1861 he enlisted in the New Hampshire Battalion of the First Rhode Island Volunteer Cavalry, and was afterward transferred to the First New Hampshire Cavalry, with the rank of Captain. He remained in the service throughout the late war, acting at one time as Provost Marshal. Claremont, and was thereafter engaged in his profession until 1869. In that year he was appointed United States Consul to Canada, a post which he efficiently filled for twelve years. Upon his return to Claremont he was made Judge of Probate, and he afterward served as Representative to the State legislature. He was largely interested in educational matters, was liberal in religion, and he was a member in good standing of the A. F. & A. M. He died December 18, 1890. He and his wife had three children. One died in infancy; and Charles Edwin died at the age of twelve years, from...

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Biography of James Humphrey

James Humphrey, as lawyer, editor, judge and state official, firmly established his position throughout a period of half a century as one of the ablest and most popular citizens of Central Kansas. He was born in Nottinghamshire, England, March 8, 1833; came to New England in 1854, and during the succeeding three years was a resident of Fall River, Massachusetts. There he became interested in the Kansas agitation for free statehood and in April, 1857, reached Manhattan. His first employment in connection with the shrievalty was a good test of his pluck, and he so arose to the occasion that he was afterward elected mayor. In 1859 and 1860 he served as assistant county treasurer and in 1861 was head of the office. He also served as justice of the peace, and his trial of the cases brought before him brought so much commendations from the lawyears of both sides that he decided to study law. He was admitted to the bar in 1863. He has previously broken into journalism by editing the Manhattan Express in the absence of C. F. DeVivaldi, who was serving abroad as consul to Brazil. After the Civil war Mr. Humphrey established a large practice, and handled it with such ability that in the spring of 1867 he was appointed judge of the Eighth Judicial District. In the fall of that year he was...

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Biography of Rev. William Knipe

Rev. William Knipe is one of the few surviving participants in the war with Mexico, which was fought nearly seventy years ago. Many other interesting distinctions attach to this venerable and useful resident of Kansas. He was one of the pioneer Methodist missionaries in Jackson County, Kansas, and is one of the very oldest members of the Methodist Conference. He was also a soldier of the Civil war and few men who live so long succeed in compressing so much useful service to humanity within a lifstime. His birth occurred in a log house in Wayne County, Indiana, September 28, 1827. He is now nearing the eighty-ninth milestone on the journey of a well spent career, and enjoys the comfort of a good home in Manhattan. His parents were John and Jemima (Jackson) Knipe, His father, though born in England, was of German lineage. He came to the United States in early manhood in company with his brother Thomas Knipe. Settling on a farm in Wayne County, Indiana, he was a pioneer there and spent his days usefully and honorably. Reverend Mr. Knipe’s mother was a native of North Carolina. She died when he was six years old and ten years later he was deprived of the guidance and care of a father. From that early age he has been dependent upon his own resourees. A limited education was...

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Biography of Rev. John A. Anderson

Rev. John A. Anderson, so long identified with the work of the Presbyterian Church at Junction City, and, while a resident of that place, with the affairs of Congress, of which he was a member, had a remarkable experience for a elergyman. He graduated from Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, in 1853, Benjamin Harrison being his roommate for a time. Mr. Anderson began his ministerial work at Stockton, California, in 1857, and is said to have preached the first union sermon on the Pacific coast. In 1860 the state legislature of California elected him trustee of the state insane asylum. Two years later he was appointed chaplain of the Third California Infantry, and in that capacity he accompanied General Connor’s expedition to Salt Lake City. As correspondent and agent of the United States Sanitary Commission for California his first duty was to act as relief agent of the Twelfth army corps. He was next transferred to the central office at New York. In 1864, when General Grant began moving toward Richmond, Mr. Anderson was made superintendent of transportation and had charge of six steamboats. At the close of the campaign he served as assistant superintendent of the canvas and supply department at Philadelphia and edited a paper ealled the Sanitary Commission Bulletin. When the war closed he was transterred to the history burean of the commission at Washington, remaining there...

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Biography of Alfred Clark Pierce

At the age of eighty-one, bearing the impress of a life of remarkable experience, a pioneer builder of Kansas, for many years identified with its public and business life, this venerable citizen is now living in comfortable retirement at Junction City. A small party of free state men arrived in Kansas in 1856. It comprised eight or ten men. One of them was Preston B. Plumb, whose name is a household word in Kansas. Alfred Clark Pierce was also in that little party. At Iowa City, Iowa, he had first met Mr. Plumb, and they were ever afterwards intimate friends. Besides coming to Kansas as pioneer settlers and for the purpose of lending their individual aid to the free state movement, this party convoyed a very significant train of supplies, including 250 Sharpe rifles, a supply of ammunition, and a small brass cannon. Those who are acquainted with the seenes anacted on Kansas soil in subsequent months need not be told to what purpose these military supplies were devoted. At Manhattan the party divided. Mr. Pierce went to what was then the far western Kansas, and located a claim on which the City of Salina had since been built. However, in November, 1856, he abandoned the claim and went to Ogden. There he was employed in cutting logs and later took up surveying. Mr. Pierce permanently settled at Junction...

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Biography of William L. Nelson, M.D.

Dr. William L. Nelson, a physician with office and residence at No. 1483 Union boulevard in St. Louis, was born in Montgomery county, Missouri, July 12, 1879. His father, William Nelson, was of American birth, but his father came from Ireland to the new world. The former took up the occupation of farming in southeastern Missouri, where he owned three hundred acres, constituting a valuable farm to which he added many modern improvements. He married Ursula Gibbens, who was also born in the new world and was a niece of Brigadier General Gibbens of Civil war fame, serving with the Union army. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Nelson was celebrated in Rising Sun, Indiana, and both have passed away, the death of the father occurring in 1891, when he was fifty-three years of age, while the mother departed this life in December, 1890. They were parents of eight children, five sons and three daughters, of whom William L. is the fifth in order of birth. Of this family Maude, Minnie, Carl and Frank are deceased, while Ada is the wife of Oscar Hagan of Selma, California. Walter is an automobile salesman and assistant sales manager for the Dorris Motor Car Company of St. Louis and married Kate Finnell of this city. Hugh is a locomotive engineer who married Laura Haverkamp, also residing in St. Louis. William L. Nelson,...

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Biography of J. A. Truex

J. A. TRUEX, editor of the Journal and postmaster of West Plains, was a native of the Buckeye State,and was born in Marion County, November,6, 1843. The Truex family is of Dutch origin and an old Colonial one. The father of our subject, Benjamin Truex, was a native of Pennsylvania, and a farmer and carpenter. He raised a family of eight children, of whom our subject was third in order of birth. The latter grew to mature years in his native country, received his primary education in the schools of the same, and subsequently entered the High School at Goshen, Indiana Later he attended the Heading College at Abingdon, Ill, and the Kalamazoo Baptist College. About the year 1856 the family moved to Elkhart County, Indiana, and settled on a farm in Lock Township. Early in life young Truex became a teacher, and continued this until 1869, when he emigrated to Kansas. There he located in Geary County and taught school until 1874, when he was elected county superintendent of schools and held that position up to 1884, five terms of two years each, thus showing his popularity. During that time the county took the premium three times for the best display at the State fair. In 1881 Mr. Truex established the Davis County Republican and edited it until 1884. In that year he bought the Journal and moved...

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Biography of Albe B. Whiting

Albe B. Whiting, a resident of Topeka for the past forty years, is distinguished as being one of the few survivors of the great free-soil struggle in Kansas during the decade of the ’50m. His home had been in Kansas since 1856, and few men now living have more interesting-experiences to connect them with Kansas history. Of New England birth and ancestry, he was born in Lamoille County, Vermont, November 10, 1835, and had already Imssed the fourscoro milestone on life’s joursey. His parents were Harris and Mary (Dodge) Whiting. His father was of old English celonial ancestry, and died in 1847, when Albe B. Whiting was twelve years old. The oldest son in the family, much of the burden of family support fell upon his young abouldera. He became inured to toil, and worked early and late not only as a contributor to the household but also to supply himself with the necessary equipment of education. He attended the common schools, and also paid his way through a few terms at the Academy at Johnson. When quite young he absorbed from his father and mother the abolition and temperance ideas which had much to do with his subsequent life. Thus he became interested in the struggle between the proslavery and the free state elements in Kansas, and that interest led him to ally himself with this section of...

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Biography of Samuel V. Mallory

Samuel V. Mallory, now superintendent of the city schools of Morrill, Brown County, had been a, Kansas educator for many years. He had been connected at different times with the public schools of three states–Nebraska, Kansas and Oklahoma–and both as a teacher and administrator his work rests upon the seeure foundation of sincere and effective service. Mr. Mallory had lived in Kansas since early youth and he represents some of the best elements of American ancestry. His great-grandfather, John William Mallory, spent his life in Virginia, having been born near Harper’s Ferry. He married Elizabeth peyton, who was the daughter of an officer in the Revolutionary war. Mr. Mallory’s grandfsther was Valentine Roger Mallory, who was born at Harper’s Ferry in Virginia in 1797, and moved from that state to Sangamon County, Illinois, near the capital at Springfield, and was an early farmer in that district. He died at Springfield in 1866. His wife was Nancy Dawson, a native of Kentucky. Several generations of the family were represented in and around Springfield, Illinois, and it was in that city that Samuel V. Mallory was born April 16, 1856. His father is the venerable R. U. Mallory, who was born at Springfield in 1828 and is still living, nearly ninety years of age, at Morrill, Kansas. He grew up and married at Springfield, became a farmer, and in 1871 migrated...

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Biography of Charles H. Browne

Charles H. Browne is proprietor and editor of the Horton Headlight-Commercial, now the only journal published in that enterprising and flourishing city of Brown County. Mr. Browne had been largely identified with newspaper work since he left school, and is a vigorous type of citizen and easily a leader in any community. For a number of years he had been connected with the National Guard of Kansas and had been especially active in recent events in which the country had been involved in tronble, first with Mexico and later with Germany. The Horton Headlight-Commercial is a consolidation of half a dozen different Horton newspapers. As reported in the “History of Kansas Newspapers,” issued by the Kansas State Historical Society, the Headlight-Commercial is a continuation of the Horton Headlight, founded in 1886 by Harley W. Brundige and Samuel Baer_ In 1901 it was consolidated with the Leader, which had been founded in 1899 by Johnson & Law. The name was changed to Horton Headlight-Leader, Johnson & Law editors and publishera. But the name was soon changed to Headlight, and this newspaper Mr. Browne purchased in 1906. In 1911 it consolidated with the Commercial under the name Headlight-Commercial, with Mr. Browne as editor and published. The Horton Commercial was founded in 1887 by John S. Sherdeman. At different times in its history the Headlight had had daily issucs. Mr. Charles H....

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Biography of Charles May

When the roll of the pioneers of Boise, Idaho, is called the name which heads this sketch will be found well to the top. Charles May was born in Berkshire, England, May 17, 1833, and was reared in his native county, learning in his boyhood the business of brick manufacturing and brick-laying, his father, Charles May, having been engaged in that business. Indeed, the family for centuries, or as far back as their history can be traced, were brick-makers in England. The younger Charles May remained in England until 1856, when he came to America, locating first in New York, and he put in the first gas retorts in the Harlem Gas Works. He remained in New York and Brooklyn until the spring of 1857, when he went to Chicago, where he was for a time engaged in contracting, and then he went to St. Louis and New Orleans. He was in Missouri at the time the civil war broke out and about that time he went to Kansas, where he was a resident during the exciting times which marked the history of that state. He built the first brick house in Junction City, Kansas. In May 1862, he started across the plains for the far west, traveling with the regulation wagons, which were drawn by horses or mules. When his party arrived at Fort Laramie they learned that...

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Biography of John Henry Prescott

John Henry Prescott. At the close of the Civil war, in which he had played a gallant role as a Union soldier and had attained the rank of captain, Mr. Prescott came out to Kansas and from that time until his death on July 5, 1891, was a notable figure in the life and affairs of Salina and that part of the state. He attained high rank as a lawyer and as a jurist, and was also remarkably successful in business affairs. His name and memory may well be cherished by his descendants and by the people of the entire state. Captain Prescott was born October 14, 1840, at Pittsfield, New Hampshire. He is of old New England stock, and this branch of the Prescott family goes back in American history to the year 1640. His parents were substantial farming people, John and Mary (Clark) Prescott, both natives of New Hampshire. John Henry Prescott was the second in a family of five children and the oldest of the three sons. His early life was spent on his father’s farm, and he completed his literary education at Pittefield Academy. When sixteen years of age he took up the study of law. He was still equipping himself for this profession when the Civil war broke out. On August 10, 1862, Mr. Prescott enlisted as a private in Company F of the...

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Biography of Samuel N. Harper

Samuel N. Harper. Many of the men of Kansas whose closing years of life were devoted exclusively to the peaceful pursuits of agrionlture, had seen much adventure in earlier times and on many occasions had proved as heroie as any knight of romance or history. Thus may be brought to notice the late Samuel N. Harper, for many years one of Menoken Township’s most esteemed and valued citizens. A survivor of the great civil war, afterward one of the courageous and hardy men who dared Indian treachery on the frontier and engineered great wagon trains through the mountains, and still later a developer and organized in the section in which he chose a home, Mr. Harper’s entire life was one possessing interest to all who cherish memories of early Kansas. Samuel N. Harper was born on a farm near Gaysport, Ohio, the second born in a family of four children. His parents were Joseph and Nancy Harper, the former of whom was a man of consequence, owning a farm, a salt mill and a hotel. Samuel Nelson assisted his father in these enterprises until October 6, 1862, when he enlisted for service in the Civil war, entering Company D, Seventy-eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry for a term of nine months. He was honorably discharged July 14, 1863, having safely passed through many minor battles and the great siege of Vieksburg....

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Biography of Edson Baxter

Edson Baxter. Now serving as clerk of the District Court at Marion, Captain Baxter is an old timer of Kansas and had lived in close touch with the developments of half a century and his own part therein allows him to speak with authority on the history of that period. The Baxter family came to Kansas in territorial times and did their pioneering in Morris County. Edson Baxter was fifteen years of age when he accompanied the family caravan overland, and he was able to make himself useful from the very beginning of the settlement. He was born on a farm in Lasalle County, Illinois, October 8, 1842, a son of June and Elizabeth (Lenox) Baxter. He is a descendant of the noted English divine, Richard Baxter. June Baxter, his father, was born near West Point, New York, June 30, 1805. In early life he learned the trade of blacksmith, and from New York went to Illinois. In 1858 he brought his family with wagons and teams westward from Central Illinois and located on land which he pre-empted in Morris County, Kansas. The rest of his active years were spent there as a farmer, and he died May 20, 1890. When the Baxter family settled in Morris County the settlers lived chiefly along the creeks. Law and order were not securely established, and besides some Indian seares the population...

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Houses of the Kansa Tribe

To quote from the Handbook: “Their linguistic relations are closest with the Osage, and are close with the Quapaw. In the traditional migration of the group, after the Quapaw had first separated there from, the main body divided at the mouth of Osage River, the Osage moving up that stream and the Omaha and Ponca crossing Missouri River and proceeding northward, while the Kansa ascended the Missouri on the south side to the mouth of Kansa River. Here a brief halt was made, after which they ascended the Missouri on the, south side until they reached the present north...

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