Location: Galesburg Illinois

Biographical Sketch of George Washington Schaffer

The subject of this sketch,¬†George Washington Schaffer, was born in St. Louis, Missouri, July 4, 1847. His parents removed, during his boyhood, to Galesburg, Illinois, where they resided several years. Returning to St. Louis, Mr. Schaffer engaged in the butcher business, and continued there until the fall of 1868. His next field of operation was Kansas City, where he followed his trade for some time. From Kansas City he went to St. Joseph, where he remained until 1874, and then returned to St. Louis. He lived in St. Louis one year, during which time he had a rib broken while separating some unruly cattle. The butchers association, to which he belonged, then sent him out with Cole’s Lightning-rod Company, and he traveled with them in Kansas. After another trial of the butcher’s business in Kansas City, he went to Chicago in the fall of 1875 and remained there one year in the employ of Fowler Brothers. From Chicago he proceeded to Atchison, Kansas, and thence again to St. Joseph. On first coming to Daviess county, he stopped in Gallatin, but moved out to Jamesport in the spring of 1880, and again began butchering beef for the hungry. He is one of the firm in the meat-market business of Dinsmore & Schaffer, and is also senior member of the firm of Schafer & Parks, confectioners and restaurateurs. He is a...

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Biography of Thomas E. Wagstaff

An attorney of long and successful experience in Montgomery County, both in Coffeyville and Independence, Thomas E. Wagstaff had been and is a leader in republican politics in the state, and a few years ago his name beeame known all over Kansas as a candidate for nomination to the office of governor. He lost the nomination by only a few votes. This was in 1910, when W. R. Stubbs was nominated and afterwards elected. His family have been identified with Kansas for forty years. Thomas E. Wagstaff was born at Galesburg, Illinois, July 23, 1875, and was still an infant when brought to this state. His father, Richard T. Wagstaff, who died at Lawrenec in 1901, is said to have been the best known traveling salesman in Kansas, and was known among retail merchants, the traveling fraternity in general, and a great host of other citizens by the affectionate title of “Uncle Dick.” For years he represented a hardware honse of St. Louis, and traveled over all the State of Kansas. He was born in Cork, Ireland, in 1842, a son of Robert Wagstaff, a native of the same place. The Wagstaff family in Ireland were of the gentry, and back in the times of the protectorate Oliver Cromwell gave thom grants of land which are still owned by their descendants. Robert Wagstaff came to America at the close...

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Biography of Charles E. Hyndman, M. D.

Dr. Charles E. Hyndman, of St. Louis, brings to his profession the thorough training of study at home and abroad and has rendered most important professional service to his fellowmen in private practice and in overseas work during the World war. He was born in Sparta, Randolph county, Illinois, June 29, 1881, a son of Charles C. and Julia (Carrigan) Hyndman, the former a native of Illinois and a representative of one of its pioneer families that removed to the middle west from Pennsylvania. Charles C. Hyndman became a manufacturer of wagons and successfully conducted business. He was also a Civil war veteran and passed away in 1883 when but thirty-six years of age. His wife was a native of New York and died in 1888 at the age of forty years. They were the parents of five children, two sons and three daughters. Dr. Hyndman, who was fourth in order of birth, was educated in the public and high schools of Sparta, Illinois, and spent two years as a student in Knox College at Galesburg, Illinois. He subsequently attended the Washington University as a medical student and won his professional degree in 1906. Following his graduation, he was the honor man in a competitive examination for interneship at St. Louis City Hospital, and in 1907 became interne in St. Luke’s Hospital, occupying both positions for about a year....

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Biographical Sketch of Matthew Neeves

MATTHEW NEEVES. – Mr. Neeves, a prominent citizen of Pendleton, Oregon, was born near Syracuse, New York, in 1830. He there received a common-school education and remained until he was twenty years old. Going west to Galesburg, Illinois, he made his way in that new section in the capacity of a Yankee school-master. After one year in that place he went to Platt county, and remained another year as teacher. In 1852 he was induced to join the company of the veteran pioneer Joab Powell, and arrived at Portland in October of the same year. He first turned his attention to mining on Rogue River, and remained one year. After this he made his home in Douglas county until 1862, and went thence to the Florence mines, and was engaged in mining and freighting until 1867. At that date he returned to Douglas county, and remained in that delightful region more than ten years. After this long rest he was ready again for a new settlement, and, coming to Umatilla county, located a claim on Butter creek, and remained engaged in stock-raising and farming until 1880. The attractions of Pendleton, however, which was now becoming a point of interest and importance, led him to make his home within her borders and enjoy the remaining years of his life. He has one daughter and a stepson. After many reverses he...

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Biography of Alvin L. Williamson

Alvin L. Williamson. The many business interests that at present serve to make Clay Center one of the important young cities of Kansas cover almost every modern activity and profession, and include also some of the oldest industries, milling for example, that aecompanied the settlement of the first pioneers in Clay County. Long before improved machinery and modern methods of using motive power had been thought of, every deep-falling stream that could be profitably dammed had a grinding mill on its bank before civilized living was accepted as complete in that section. Pioneer history is full of atories of the inconveniencas and hardships and often dangers that were encountered in getting the precious “grist” to and from the mill, often many miles distant. It was usually of primitive construction and its equipments were not designed to produce the fine milling products of today, but it was a prime necessity of the time. Such, probably, was the orlginal mill that stood on the present site of the Williamson milling properties at Clay Center, which include the great modern flour mill, the elevator and the office building, with two mighty dams on the Republic River. For twenty years this property had been in the Williamson name and for a number of years the management of the Williamson Milling Company was in the hands of Alvin L. Williamson, who, along with other...

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Biography of Julius S. Waters

A distinguished jurist has said: “In the American state the great and good lawyer must always be prominent, for he is one of the forces that move and control society. Public confidence has generally been reposed in the legal profession. It has ever been the defender of popular rights, the champion of freedom regulated by law, the firm support of good government. In the times of danger it has stood like a rock and breasted the mad passions of the hour and finally resisted tumult and faction.” A review of the history of Julius Spencer Waters shows that his life is largely an exemplification of this statement; that as an individual he has shared in the work thus attributed to the class, and through many years has labored for the good of the nation, advocating every measure intended to advance the welfare, prosperity and happiness of his people. His ancestors were among those who fought for American independence, his grandfather, Walter Waters, and his brothers all serving in the colonial army. His father, William Waters, was born in Monroe County, New York, in 1795, and was a soldier in the war of 18 12, participating in tire battle of Lundy’s Lane under General Scott. He was one of the pioneers of the western reserve of Ohio, locating in Ashtabula County. In 1837 he removed with his family from Ohio...

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Biography of Judge John T. Morgan

The gentleman whose name heads this review has been a conspicuous figure in the legislative and judicial history of two states. Probably the public life of no other illustrious citizen of Idaho has extended over as long a period as his, and certainly the life of none has been more varied in service, more constant in honor, more fearless in conduct and more stainless in reputation. His career has been one of activity, full of incidents and results. In every sphere of life in which he has been called upon to move he has made an indelible impression, and by his excellent public service and upright life he has honored the state, which has honored him with high official preferment. Judge Morgan was born in Hamburg, Erie County, New York. His ancestors, leaving the little rock-ribbed country of Wales, became early settlers of New England, and through many generations members of the family were residents of Connecticut and active participants in the affairs which go to form’ the colonial history of the nation. In the war of the Revolution they fought for the independence of the country, and at all times have been loyal to American interests. James Clark Morgan, the father of the Judge, was born in Connecticut in 1798, and married Penelope Green, a native of Herkimer County, New York. He was an industrious farmer and served...

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Biography of William Edwin Nelson

William Edwin Nelson, who became superintendent of the public schools of Sabetha in the fall of 1917, is a thoroughly experienced educator, a native of Kansas, and for five years before removing to Sabetha was superintendent of schools at Robinson. Mr. Nelson had the qualification and training of a practical lawyer, which was the profession of his father. For many years one of the ablest attorneys of the Trego County bar was the late John A. Nelson. Born in Sweden, near Stockholm, in 1851, he was brought when an infant to the United States by his parents, who located in Illinois, where he grew up and acquired a liberal education. He was graduated from Knox College at Galesburg, Illinois, with the degree A. B., studied law in Galesburg, was admitted to the bar, and after some years of practice there moved out to Western Kansas in 1879 and was one of the pioneer lawyers at Wakeeney. He enjoyed a large and infinential elientele in that section and was in active practice until a short time before his death, when he removed to Lawrence, Kansas, and died there in November, 1915. For many years he served as county attorney of Trego County, and was a member in good standing of the Trego County Bar Association, the State Bar Association and the American Bar Association. Politically he was a republican, was...

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Biography of De Forest Chamberlain

Not only has the subject of this all too brief sketch seen southeastern Idaho grow from a wild country, with only a few white inhabitants, to a rich agricultural country, containing thousands of good homes and acres of growing towns, inhabited by an industrious, prosperous, enlightened and progressive people, but he has participated in and assisted the slow, persistent work of development which was necessary to produce a change which is so complete that it has come to be popularly referred to as magical. De Forest Chamberlain is descended from English and Irish ancestors, who settled in America before the Revolution and were participants in the struggle for liberty. Riley Chamberlain, his father, was born in Vermont, and married Miss Sarah Mann, a native of Onondaga County. New York. With his wife he removed to Illinois, some time between 1830 and 1840, where he died in 1873, aged sixty-six years. His widow is still living, aged eighty-one, making her home with a daughter at Creston, Iowa. They had three children. De Forest Chamberlain was born in Stark County, Illinois, August 24, 1843. He entered Lombard University with the intention of taking the full collegiate course, but his studies were interrupted by his patriotic ardor, aroused by the opening of actual hostilities between the northern and southern sections of our country, early in 1861. He was one of the first...

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Biographical Sketch of William Henry Whitney

Whitney, William Henry; insurance; born, Monticello, Minn., June 21, 1860; son of Cephas Newhall and Cyrena Patch Whitney; educated, Knox College, Galesburg, Ill., classical course, 1884; married, Trinidad, Colo., 1890, Emma Gmin; issue, four children, two sons and two daughters; manager The Phoenix Mutual Life Insurance Co.; member executive committee Congregational Club, 1912, and pres. of The Cleveland Congregational Brotherhood, 1911-1912; member Phi Delta Theta...

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Biographical Sketch of Andrew Barclay Meldrum

Meldrum, Andrew Barclay; Presbyterian minister; born, Scotland, Sept. 9, 1857; son of Capt. Robert and Agnes Ness (Grant) Meldrum; educated, professionally, at Knox College and University of Toronto, graduating in Theology at the Theological Seminary of San Francisco; (D. D. Hanover College); married, in 1885, to Laura R. Rison, of Oakland, Cal.; issue, two sons and two daughters; in 1907, married Ella Hoyt Herrick, of Cleveland; pastor in San Francisco, Cal., Evansville, Ind., St. Paul, Minn., and now Old Stone Church, Cleveland; Grand Chaplain, Masonic Grand Lodge of Ohio, 1913; member Robert Burns Society of Cleveland, and Rotary Club; Chaplain Cleveland...

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Biography of Amos S. Lapham

Amos S. Lapham. There are but few members of the bar of Southeastern Kansas who have exceeded the record of Amos S. Lapham, of Chanute, for length and continuity of service, for devotion to the best ethics of the profession and for connection with important litigation. His standing is that of one of the foremost members of the bar of this part of the state. Judge Lapham was born on a farm in Champaign County, Ohio, April 6, 1845, and is a son of Oziel and Mahala (Steere) Lapham, and belongs to one of America’s old and honored families. John Lapham, the great-great-great-great-grandfather of Judge Lapham, was born in 1635, in Devonshire, England, and came to America prior to 1673, for on April 6, of that year, he was married at Providence, Rhode Island, to Mary, the daughter of William Mann. He lived at Providence and Newport, Rhode Island, and Dartmouth, Massachusetts. In the same year he was a freeman and deputy to the general assembly, and in 1675 was constable. He owned several hundred acres of land in the vicinity of Providence, but in 1676, at the outbreak of King Philip’s war, removed to Dartmouth, Massachusetts. He was a large landholder for his day, and at the time of his death, in 1710, his estate, of which his wife Mary and son John were executors, was found to...

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Biography of Mills G. Voris

Mills G. Voris is now serving his third consecutive term as register of deeds of Cowley County. His is a case of exceptional fitness for public office. He had had a wide experience in public affairs, beginning when as a boy he was elected to succeed his father as county surveyor back in Illinois. He also knows the people and conditions in the Southwest, particularly in Cowley County, and had been both a farmer and business man. He is honest, capable, competent and efficient, and the work of his office was never in better hands. Mr. Voris was born in Knox County, Illinois, November 8, 1861. His paternal ancestors were Holland people and were Colonial settlers in New York State. His great-grandfather served as an orderly under General Washington during the Revolutionary war. His grandfather, Peter Voris, was born in 1801, spent most of his active life as a farmer near Akron, Ohio, but died at Mattoon, Illinois, in 1871. Ralph Voris, father of the register of deeds, was born in Stark County, Ohio, in 1829. He grew up there and in young manhood went to Knox County, Illinois, where he married. He was an old-time land surveyor, and for twenty-four years held the office of county surveyor of Knox County. During the Civil war he did recruiting duty for the Union cause. He was a republican and a...

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Biography of Eugene L. Dimick

Eugene L. Dimick. The vocation of writing and selling insurance had grown to enormous proportions during recent years, not entirely because the people have come to a realization of the necessity for protection, but also because of the men who are engaged in this line of endeavor, who are educating the general public in realizing the benefits accruing from insurance. To succeed in this line of business a man must possess certain qualities not found necessary in other avenues of business, including a thorough knowledge of all the angles of his vocation, a keen insight into human nature, have the faculty to put forth his facts and figures in a forcible and at the same time attractive way, and the ability to place his client’s insurance with a reliable company which will conserve the interests of the assured. Prominent among the men who are making the handling of insurance and loans their business in Southeastern Kansas, and who have won success in this difficult field, is found Eugene L. Dimick, of Chanute, whose long, active and honorable career had been featured by activities in various business enterprises. Mr. Dimick was born at Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania, October 28, 1855, and is a son of A. S. and Emma M. (Levering) Dimick. The Dimick family was originally from England and was founded in this country during colonial days by two brothers,...

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Biography of Fred Titterington

Few men are sufficiently versatile to successfully pursue two separate and entirely different vocations during their lives. Rare, indeed, is the farmer that becomes a dividend earning manufacturer, especially after he has attained middle age, and become a man of substance through his own efforts in tilling the soil. Such, however, has been the achievement of Fred Titterington, formerly a farmer in the vicinity of Edgington post office and now secretary and general manager of the Argillo works at Carbon Cliff. Mr. Titterington is another native of Rock Island County, having been born at Edgington September 1, 1852. He was the son of Charles and Sophia Titterington, pioneers of the community. His early education was that of the average farmer boy, save that he had the additional advantage of a course at Knox Academy at Galesburg, Illinois. Until he was nineteen years of age he worked on his father’s farm and then he set out for himself, and for a number of years tilled the soil on the present site of the village of Reynolds. Later he farmed in Buffalo Prairie Township and eventually purchased a tract of land in Edgington Township, which was his home till 1899. Always a more or less active Republican, he was rewarded by his party by election to the offices of treasurer of Rock Island County in 1894, serving one term of four...

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