Location: Fulton County NY

Biography of Ward Burlingame

Ward Burlingame, during the twenty years of his activities in Kansas, a well known journalist of Leavenworth and a confidential secretary to several noted men of the commonwealth, while over a quarter of a century of his life was devoted to the national postal service, ten years as chief clerk of the dead letter division. He was born at Gloversville, New York, February 6, 1836, and received a public school and academic education prior to locating at Leavenworth in 1858. Mr. Burlingame’s first newspaper experience was on a daily paper called the Ledger, edited by George W. McLane. Later he assisted in founding the Leavenworth Daily Herald, which was established in connection with the weekly edition, and while on this paper he ran the gauntlet of every position on the staff. Subsequently he worked on the Times and Evening Bulletin. After the election of 1862 Governor Carney invited him to become his private secretary and he went to Topeka. In January, 1866, Mr. Burlingame became a resident of Washington, District of Columbia, as confidential secretary to James H. Lane, then United States senator from Kansas, and remained with him during the spring of that year. On his return to Kansas he was given editorial charge of the Leavenworth Conservative, but during Governor Crawford’s second term served as his private secretary, and he continued to hold the same position during...

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Biography of Lucius Cozzens Rice

Lucius Cozzens Rice, state treasurer of Idaho and one of the leading business men of the commonwealth, is a native of Riceville, Fulton county, New York, where he was born June 30, 1867. being the only son now living that was born to the marriage of Harvey P. and Sarah C. Rice. The Rice family is one of the oldest in Central New York; and in the old dwelling, which is still standing, and in which Mr. Rice was born, five generations have lived. This residence was built prior to the war for American independence, by Colonel Oliver Rice, who was a soldier under Washington. Mr. Rice prepared for college at the Clinton Seminary, at Clinton, New York, and subsequently entered Union College at Schenectady, same state, where he took the classical course, was president of his class and a member of the college society, Alpha Delta Phi. Completing his college course, Mr. Rice came west and first located at Gunnison, Colorado, and later was engaged in merchandising at Sapinero, Colorado, for nine months, and then for some time at Delta, the same state; and in 1891 he came to Idaho, on horseback, looking for a location, and settled at St. Anthony, where, under the firm name of Rice & Findley, he opened a general merchandise store. This business venture has been a success from its inception and has...

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Biography of Paul E. Havens

Paul E. Havens. The late Paul E. Havens, one of the pioneers of Leavenworth, and whose name is closely interwoven with the material growth and prosperity of the city, was a man of unusual force of character. He was born at Ephratah, Fulton County, New York, May 4, 1839, and was a son of C. D. P. and Eleanor (Frey) Havens, a grandson of Paul and Anne (Kennedy) Havens, and a great-grandson of Daniel and Elizabeth (Bostwick) Havens. The progenitor of this family in America was William Havens, a native of Wales, who located at Portsmouth, Rhode Island, in 1636. Daniel Havens was a sea captain and died at Sag Harbor, New York, when still a young man. Anne (Kennedy) Havens was a daughter of Robert Kennedy, who served the Colonies during their struggle for independence, and Eleanor (Frey) Havens was a daughter of Philip R. Frey, whose people came to this country from Switzerland during Colonial days. Paul E. Havens was left fatherless when eight years old, and when fourteen became a clerk in a store at Elmira, New York. He had an abundance of vitality and ambition, and with these as his chief assets started for the West in 1856, in which year he located at Davenport, Iowa. In 1858 Kansas was “away out west,” but it had become widely advertised by reason of the Lincoln-Douglas debates,...

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Martha Collins Todd Hill

HILL, Martha Collins Todd7, (John6, Timothy5, Timothy4, Jonathan3, John2, Christopher1) born April 1, 1831, marricd March 11, 1857, Rev. Charles Jenkins Hill, who graduated from Williams College, and Andover Theological Seminary. He was a congregational clergyman and held pastorates at Nashua, N. H., Whiteall and Gloversville, N. Y., Ansonia, Middletown and Stonington, Conn. Children: I. Annie Williams, b. March 23, 1858, m. (???) Harper. II. John Todd, b. April 16, 1863, m. Grace(???). III. Miriam, b. Oct. 23,...

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Biography of Zerah S. Westbrook

ZERAH S. WESTBROOK HON. Zera S. Westbrook, the present deputy comptroller of the state of New York, has an interesting and instructive history. As a state official he is at this time a temporary resident of Albany, his residence and home being at Amsterdam, N. Y. His career is one which illustrates in a striking manner, the rise, progress and development of a character such as only can be found in a land of free institutions, without the aid of the wealthy, titled, so called nobility. As will be seen in a brief review of his life, he has already exhibited those qualities which belong to true manhood. Born at Montague, Sussex County, N. J., on the 7th of April, 1845, he spent his youthful days on a farm. His father, Severyne L. Westbrook, tilled a farm at that place. Zerah was a bright, delicate child and the delight of his parents. But he had scarcely reached the age of four years before the grave closed over his father, a useful and respected citizen; and his mother was called upon to make renewed struggles in his behalf during the opening years of his life. His mother was Susan E., daughter of James B. Armstrong of Montague, one of the prominent citizens of Sussex County. She was an intelligent and very pious woman, and died on November 22, 1889, in...

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Sir William Johnson, Johnstown, New York

Sir William Johnson was the first official representative of the British Crown to the Iroquois Confederacy. This man, strong in body and friendly in manner, attended and showed an interest in the Mohawk Councils. He also took an active part in the Indian sports and games and learned the Mohawk language. Johnson’s fair dealing with the Six Nations became recognized by the Confederacy. His appointment as Superintendent of Six Nation Affairs, won the approval of the Chiefs, Warriors and Women of the Six Nations. Colonel Johnson was given the highest honour the Six Nations could give a leader or...

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