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Location: Fulton County GA

North America Indian Names of Places in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, and Louisiana

The Indians all over this continent had names, traditions, religions, ceremonies, feasts, prayers, songs, dances all, more or less, with symbolism and allegory, adapted to circumstances, just as all other races of mankind. But the world has become so familiar with the continued and ridiculous publications in regard to everything touching upon that race of people that a universal doubt has long since been created and established as to the possibility of refinement of thought and nobleness of action ever having existed among the North American Indian race, ancient or modern; and so little of truth has also been learned regarding the real and true inner life of that peculiar and seemingly isolated race of mankind, that today only here and there can one be found who, from a lifetime association and intimate acquaintance, is well versed in Indian thought, feeling and character, and able to unfold and record the solution of that imagined mystery known as “The Indian Problem,” since they learned it from the Indians themselves. From the Indians own lips they were taught its elucidation, and only as it could be taught and learned, but never again can be taught and learned. Even as various nations of antiquity of, the eastern continent have left the evidences of their former occupation by the geographical names that still exist, so to have the North American Indians left their...

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Obituary of Bert Brown

Bert BROWN, age 74 of 102 Walnut St., passed away at the Portland Veteran’s Hospital April 27. He was a retired millworker. Graveside services were held at the Hillcrest Cemetery Saturday, April 30, under the direction of the WW1 Veterans. Mr. BROWN was born in Atlanta, Georgia, Nov. 15, 1891 and had lived in La Grande 40 years. He was a member of the WW1 Veterans and the Blue Mt. Grange. Survivors include his wife, Ella, La Grande; one son, Gilbert BROWN, West Minster, Calif.; three daughters, Mrs. Alice KANNARD, Portland, Mrs. Louella TACY, Oakridge, Ore., and Mrs. Evelyn LOVELESS, La Grande. Also surviving are one brother in Detroit, Mich., and four sisters, Mrs. Cary RANDALL, La Grande; Mrs. Verdie BROWN, Baker, one in Longview, Wash. and in Idaho Falls, Ida.; twelve grandchildren and other relatives. Eastern Oregon Review, May 5, 1966 Contributed by: Holly...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. J. S. Jones

(See Foreman).— Mary Elizabeth Dege, born in Atlanta, Georgia, October 30, 1881, educated at Pryor and Female Seminary. Married Oct­ober 5, 1907, J. S. Jones, D. D. S. They are the parents of James Staunton, born January 5, 1909; Mary Pauline, born July 7. 1911 and Helen Mercedes Jones, born September 13, 1913. Dr. Jones is a graduate of the Southern Dental College of Atlanta, Georgia. He was a volunteer in the World War and was stationed at Camp Greenleaf, was commissioned a First Lieutenant and transferred to Camp Mills, N. Y. Received his discharge on January 21, 1919. He is at present the Commander of the American Legion camp at Pryor. Mrs. Dr. Jones belongs to the Baptist church, is an Eastern Star and White Shriner. Anthony Foreman, a Scotchman married Susie, a full blood Cherokee of the Savannah Clan and their daughter Catherine married James Bigby. They were the parents of Mary Anna Bigby, born August 9, 1802, she married David Taylor, born in Orange County, Virginia, December 16, 1791. Their son James Taylor was the father of Laura Alice Taylor, born June 10, 1846, in North Carolina, married at Walhalla, South Caro­lina, October 13, 1867. John Henry Dege born February 4, 1845 in Bassum, Hanover Germany and they were the parents of Mrs. Mary Elizabeth...

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Biography of Clement Richardson

Clement Richardson, of Jefferson City, president of the Lincoln Institute, deserves mention as an eminent educator, for his professional work has been not merely instilling knowledge into the minds of pupils but has been broad in its scope, thoughtful in its purposes and human in its tendency. lie has studied the individual and his requirement, has met the needs of the school and has made valuable contributions to literature that has to do with his profession. Mr. Richardson was born June 23. 1878, in Halifax county, Virginia, a son of Leonard and Louise (Barksdale) Richardson. In his youthful days he attended the White Oak Grove country school, but his opportunity to pursue his studies was limited to a brief period each year, as it was necessary that he work in the tobacco fields. He was still quite a young lad when obliged to leave school in Virginia, and later he became mail carrier for the Brow Hill plantation near Paces station. In 1895, however, prompted thereto by a laudable ambition, he made his way to Massachusetts seeking work and with a view to promoting his education. After spending some years in Winchester, Massachusetts, working in a tannery, a glue factory and on a farm, through the help of the Young Men’s Christian Association and the First Baptist church of Winchester, he was able to enter the Dwight L. Moody...

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Native American History of Milton County, Georgia

Milton County was located in northern Georgia. As part now of Fulton County, all of old Milton County is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) Its county seat was Alpharetta prior to the annexation of Milton and Campbell Counties by Fulton County in 1932. In 1932 Milton County (on the north) and Campbell County (on the south,) merged with Fulton County. Cobb County ceded the City of Roswell and a section of land along Wileo Creek to Fulton, in order to make the original section of Milton contiguous with Milton. The Native American histories of Campbell, Fulton and Milton Counties are covered as separate articles. Geology and hydrology Milton County was located in the Upper Piedmont geological region, which is characterized by underlying rock strata of igneous and metamorphicized igneous rock. The Upper Piedmont terrain generally consists of rolling hills and stream valleys, but in some areas can seem semi-mountainous. This is because high mountains once stood at these locations, but have eroded to large hills through the eons. The section of the Chattahoochee River passing the original portion of Milton County generally has a narrow flood plain. There are few permanent wetlands paralleling the streams that flow into the Chattahoochee. The top soils are thin over most hills and steep slopes, while much deeper near streams. Milton County was north of the old Cotton Line,...

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Native American History of Fulton County, Georgia

Fulton County located in northern Georgia. Most references state that Fulton County was named for Robert Fulton, the investor of the steam boat. However, recent research by historians have led them to conclude that it was actually named after Hamilton Fulton, a British-born civil engineer, who practiced his profession in Milledgeville (then the Georgia state capital) between 1825 and 1828. All of Fulton County is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) Its county seat is Atlanta. In 1932 Milton County (on the north) and Campbell County (on the south,) merged with Fulton County. Cobb County ceded the City of Roswell and a section of land along Wileo Creek to Fulton, in order to make the original section of Fulton contiguous with Milton. Culturally, Campbell County was very similar to counties in west-central Georgia, while Fulton was north of the original “cotton line” and therefore more similar to counties in the Highlands of Georgia. The Native American histories of Campbell and Milton Counties are covered as separate articles. Geology and hydrology Fulton County was located in the Upper Piedmont geological region, which is characterized by underlying rock strata of igneous and metamorphicized igneous rock. The Upper Piedmont terrain generally consists of rolling hills and stream valleys, but in some areas can seem semi-mountainous. This is because high mountains once stood at these locations, but have eroded to...

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Slave Narrative of Julia Brown (Aunt Sally)

Interviewer: Geneva Tonsill Person Interviewed: Julia Brown (Aunt Sally) Date of Interview: July 25, 1930 [TR:?] Location: 710 Griffin, Place, N. W., Atlanta, Georgia Ah Always Had A Hard Time Aunt Sally rocked back and forth incessantly. She mopped her wrinkled face with a dirty rag as she talked. “Ah wuz born fo’ miles frum Commerce, Georgia, and wuz thirteen year ole at surrender. Ah belonged to the Nash fambly—three ole maid sisters. My mama belonged to the Nashes and my papa belonged to General Burns; he wuz a officer in the war. There wuz six of us chilluns, Lucy, Malvina, Johnnie, Callie, Joe and me. We didn’t stay together long, as we wuz give out to different people. The Nashes didn’t believe in selling slaves but we wuz known as their niggers. They sold one once ’cause the other slaves said they would kill him ’cause he had a baby by his own daughter. So to keep him frum bein’ kilt, they sold him. “My mama died the year of surrender. Ah didn’t fare well after her death, Ah had sicha hard time. Ah wuz give to the Mitchell fambly and they done every cruel thing they could to me. Ah slept on the flo’ nine years, winter and summer, sick or well. Ah never wore anything but a cotton dress, a shimmy and draw’s. That ‘oman didn’t care...

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Slave Narrative of Lewis Favor

Interviewer: Edwin Driskell Person Interviewed: Lewis Favor Location: Atlanta, Georgia [TR: informant also referred to as Favors in this document.] Among Atlanta’s few remaining ex-slaves is one Lewis Favors. When he fully understood this worker’s reasons for approaching him he consented to tell what he had seen and experienced as a slave. Chewing slowly on a large wad of tobacco he began his account in the following manner: “I was born in Merriweather County in 1855 near the present location of Greenville, Georgia. Besides my mother there were eight of us children and I was elder than all of them with one exception. Our owner was Mrs. Favors, but she was known to everybody as the “Widow Favors.” My father was owned by a Mr. Darden who had a plantation in this same county. When the “Widow’s” husband died he left her about one-hundred acres of land and a large sum of money and so she was considered as being rich. She didn’t have many slaves of her own and so her son (also a plantation owner) used to send some of his slaves over occasionally to help cultivate her crops, which consisted of cotton, corn, and all kinds of vegetables.” In regard to her treatment of the slaves that she held Mr. Favors says: “She wasn’t so tight and then she was pretty tight too.” Those slaves who...

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Slave Narrative of Alice Bradley

Interviewer: Grace McCune Person Interviewed: Alice Bradley Location: Athens, Georgia Alice Bradley, or “Aunt Alice” as she is known to everybody, “runs cards” and claims to be a seeress. Apologetic and embarrassed because she had overslept and was straightening her room, she explained that she hadn’t slept well because a dog had howled all night and she was uneasy because of this certain forerunner of disaster. “Here t’is Sunday mornin’ and what wid my back, de dog, and de rheumatics in my feets, its [TR: ‘done’ crossed out] too late to go to church, so come in honey I’se glad to hab somebody to talk to. Dere is sho’ goin’ to be a corpse close ’round here. One night a long time ago two dogs howled all night long and on de nex’ Sunday dere wuz two corpses in de church at de same time. Dat’s one sign dat neber fails, when a dog howls dat certain way somebody is sho’ goin’ to be daid.” When asked what her full name was, she said: “My whole name is Alice Bradley now. I used to be a Hill, but when I married dat th’owed me out of bein’ a Hill, so I’se jus’ a Bradley now. I wuz born on January 14th but I don’t ‘member what year. My ma had three chillun durin’ de war and one jus’ atter...

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Slave Narrative of George Eason

Interviewer: Edwin Driskell Person Interviewed: George Eason Location: Georgia Mr. George Eason was born in Forsyth, Ga., on the plantation of Mr. Jack Ormond. In addition to himself there were six other children, one of whom was his twin brother. He and his brother were the oldest members of this group of children. His mother, who was the master’s cook, had always belonged to the Ormond family while his father belonged to another family, having been sold while he (George) was still a baby. It so happened that Mr. Ormond was a wealthy planter and in addition to the plantation that he owned in the country, he also maintained a large mansion in the town. The first few years of his life were spent in town where he helped his mother in the kitchen by attending to the fire, getting water, etc. He was also required to look after the master’s horse. Unlike most other slave owners who allowed their house servants to sleep in the mansion, Mr. Ormond had several cabins built a short distance in the rear of his house to accommodate those who were employed in the house. This house group consisted of the cook, seamstress, maid, butler, and the wash woman. Mr. Eason and those persons who held the above positions always had good food because they got practically the same thing that was served...

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Slave Narrative of Luke Towns

Interviewer: Rachel A. Austin Person Interviewed: Luke Towns Location: Jacksonville, Florida Age: 100+(?) A Centenarian Luke Towns, a centenarian, now residing at 1335 West Eighth Street, Jacksonville, Florida, was the ninth child born to Maria and Like Towns, slaves, December 34, 1835, in a village in Tolberton County, Georgia. Mr. Town’s parents were owned by Governor Towns, whose name was taken by all the children born on the plantation; he states that he was placed on the public blocks for sale, and was purchased by a Mr. Mormon. At the marriage of Mr. Mormon’s daughter, Sarah, according to custom, he was given to this daughter as a wedding present, and thus became the slave and took the name of the Gulleys and lived with them until he became a young man at Smithville, Georgia, in Lee County. His chief work was that of carrying water, wood and working around the house when a youngster; often, he states he would hide in the woods to keep from working. Because his mother was a child-bearing woman, she did not know the hard labors of slavery, but had a small patch of cotton and a garden near the house to care for. “All of the others worked hard,” said he “but had kind masters who fed them well.” When asked if his mother were a christian, he replied “why yes: indeed she...

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Biographical Sketch of Albert Harlow Bates

Bates, Albert Harlow; patent lawyer; born, Cincinnati, O., Jan. 24, 1869; son of Cyrus S. and Lavena S. Bates; educated, Kenyon Military Academy, Gambier, O.; Brooks Military Academy, Cleveland; Lehigh University; graduated, 1889, Mechanical Engineer, Ohio State University; graduated, 1892, LL. B.; married, Atlanta, Ga., Oct. 11, 1904, Kathleen Jones; two daughters, Margaret and Elizabeth; one son, Darwin Bates; in 1892-3, in legal dept. of The Brush Electric Co., Cleveland; 1893-96, with Robert H. Parkinson, patent lawyer, Chicago, Ill.; 1897-1905, member the firm of Thurston & Bates, patent lawyers, Cleveland; 1906-9, member firm of Bates, Fonts & Hull, patent lawyers, Cleveland; 1906 to the present time, practicing attorney under the name of Albert H. Bates; member American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and Cleveland Engineering Society, Chamber of Commerce and Psi Upsilon Fraternity; member Athletic, Shaker Heights Country and Cleveland Automobile Clubs. Recreations: Fishing and...

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Biography of Hon. E. D. Shattuck

HON. E.D. SHATTUCK, – Judge Shattuck has been prominently connected with the public affairs of our state for more than thirty years, and is so closely identified with our interests and society as to be a distinctively representative man among us. His mental strength and clearness, combined with remarkable accuracy and absence of personal bias, have made his services of the highest value. He has ever maintained a peculiar coolness of judgement, and neither has been swayed by popular excitement nor has resorted to sensational methods to advance his own views or interests. He has ever been above suspicion of corruption or entanglement with corrupt rings, and has therefore been relied upon as a guardian of justice, and to prick the ambitions or corrupt designs of those who would trench upon the popular rights. For this reason he has been sought continuously to fill the office of judge; and it is a credit to our people that they prefer such men for their high positions. With peculiar plainness of manner and address, he has ever refused to cultivate popularity, yet has been frequently named by leading journals as a satisfactory candidate for governor of the state, – suggestions which have only lacked his own cooperation to meet with realization. The remarkable success of Judge Shattuck both in business, in his profession, and in public capacities, commends to young men...

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Warhol, Peter – Obituary

Peter Warhol, 99, a former Halfway resident, died Nov. 3, 2002, at a nursing home in Cedar Falls, Iowa. He had elected to receive only comfort measures for pneumonia, thereby dying as he had lived: on his own terms. A memorial service will be held November 21, in Waterloo, Iowa. His 99-year life was remarkable for its extraordinary accomplishments. Born in Minneapolis to immigrant parents in a family of six boys, he lost his mother when he was 11, which required household chores and employment at an early age. Because of this workload, when asked for details of his boyhood he would usually say that “it wasn’t very interesting.” Characteristic of his lifelong independence and confidence was his attending his high school graduation from the audience. He and a friend had completed their college requirements and quit school a semester early. The administration had disagreed with their innovative program and refused to issue them diplomas. Overcoming obstacles of finance and health, he graduated Phi Beta Kappa in metallurgical engineering from the University of Minnesota at Minneapolis in 1929 and began an unusually creative and distinguished career. While working for the Butler Bros. Mining Co. he discovered the Fuller’s Earth District near Thomasville, Ga. On the Mesabi Iron Range in Minnesota he introduced several important mining and mineral-processing innovations still in use today. He was president of Butler Brothers when...

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York, Richard “Scott” – Obituary

Richard “Scott” York, 38, of Klamath Falls, a former Baker City resident, died March 10, 2002, at his home. He suffered a lifelong hereditary disease and had been awaiting a liver transplant for the past four years. His funeral was at 4 p.m. today at the O’Hair & Riggs Funeral Chapel in Klamath Falls. The Rev. John Baund of the First Presbyterian Church officiated. Private burial was at Eternal Hills Memorial Garden. There was a reception afterward at the First Presbyterian Church in Klamath Falls. He was born in Baker City on April 7, 1963, to Carl Lockwood York and Shara Lynn Loomis. He attended Baker schools and was active in the Boy Scout program. After the death of their parents, Scott and his sister, Carol, moved to Klamath Falls in June 1979 where they lived with their loving grandparents, Gordon and Evelyn Loomis. He was a 1982 graduate of Klamath Union High School. After graduation, he attended Western Oregon University at Monmouth and Willamette University at Salem. In 1987, he moved to Seattle, where he worked as the night manager for a hotel. He next moved to Calgary, Canada, where he attended the University of Calgary. He trained as a speed skater and also worked at several national and international speed skating and figure skating events. He returned to Seattle and graduated from the International Air Academy in...

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