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Location: Franklin County MA

Narrative of Robert Eastburn – Indian Captivities

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A Faithful Narrative of the Many Dangers and Sufferings, as well as wonderful and surprising deliverances, of Robert Eastburn, during his late captivity among the Indians. Written by Himself. Published at the earnest request of many persons, for the benefit of the Public. With a recommendatory Preface by the Rev. Gilbert Tennent. Psalms 24, 6, 7, and 193, 2, 4. Philadelphia: Printed. Boston: Reprinted and sold by Green & Russell, opposite the Probate Office in Queen street, 1753. Preface Candid Reader: The author (and subject) of the ensuing narrative (who is a deacon of our church, and has been so for many years) is of such an established good character, that he needs no recommendation of others where he is known; a proof of which was the general joy of the inhabitants of this city, occasioned by his return from a miserable captivity; together with the readiness of divers persons to contribute to the relief of himself and necessitous family, without any request of his, or the least motion of that tendency. But seeing the following sheets are like to spread into many places where he is not known, permit me to say that, upon long acquaintance, I have found him to be a person of candor, integrity, and sincere piety, whose testimony may with safety...

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Narrative of the Captivity of Quintin Stockwell – Indian Captivities

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Quintin Stockwell, Who was taken at Deerfield, in Massachusetts, by a Party of Inland Indians, in the Year 1677; Communicated in his own Words, and Originally Published by the Eminent Dr. Increase Mather, in the Year 1684. A particular account of the interruption in which Stockwell and others fell into the hands of the Indians will be found in the Book of the Indians, Book iii, p. 97 and 98. Out of twenty-four at that time killed and taken, we learn the names only of these; Quintin Stockwell, John Root, Sergeant Plimpton, Benjamin Stebbins, his wife, Benjamin Waite, and Samuel Russell. Plimpton was burnt in their cruel manner, Root was killed, and Stebbins escaped. Of the others I have learned nothing. In the year 1677, September the 19th, between sunset and dark, the Indians came upon us. I and another man, being together, we ran away at the outcry the Indians made, shouting and shooting at some others of the English that were hard by. We took a swamp that was at hand for our refuge; the enemy espying us so near them, run after us, and shot many guns at us; three guns were discharged upon me, the enemy being within three rods of me, besides many others before that. Being in this swamp, which...

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Biographical Sketch of Richard Frederick Fuller

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now RICHARD FREDERICK FULLER was the fourth son. He graduated at Harvard University, 1844, studied law in Greenfield, Mass., afterwards a year at the Harvard Law School, and, having completed his studies in the office of his uncle, Henry H. Fuller, Esq., in Boston, was admitted to the bar on examination in open court, December, 1846, at the age of twenty-two. He became, and continued for two years to be, the law partner of his uncle, and subsequently practiced law with success in Boston. Having been fitted for college, at the age of sixteen he entered a store in Boston, at the solicitation of his family; but mercantile life proving distasteful to him, be relinquished it at the end of one year. By severe application, he in six months made up for this lost year, at the same time keeping pace with the studies of the Sophomore class, and was admitted to college in the middle of the Sophomore year. He graduated the second or third scholar of his class. He died at his country home in Wayland, May 30, 1869. He had a taste for literature, was deeply religious, and an ardent lover of nature. One of his greatest pleasures was to walk in the early morning through woods and fields accompanied by his...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles E. Orcutt

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Charles E. Orcutt was born in Middletown, Rutland county, Vermont, February 15, 1845. His parents were Erasmus and Philena (Edgerton) Orcutt, natives of Vermont. While our subject was yet an infant his parents removed to Allegany county, New York, and after living there two years the family removed to Massachusetts, and there, in the Deerfield Academy, our subject received his education. After leaving school be worked on a farm until twenty years of age, when he immigrated to Missouri and located at the city of Chillicothe, where he clerked for a number of years in a drug and book store. He established his present drug business in Jamesport in the autumn of 1871 and has since built up a large and prosperous trade. He was appointed postmaster on the 4th of November, 1873, and has discharged the duties of that office efficiently and to the entire satisfaction of the public ever since. He is treasurer of the city of Jamesport and secretary of the Grand River Agricultural, Horticultural and Mechanical Association. Mr. Orcutt was married at Chillicothe, Missouri, in June, 1871, to Miss Tillia Keener, daughter of George Keener, a native of Pennsylvania. Mrs. Orcutt was born at Shreveport, Pennsylvania. The issue of this union is two children: Frederick C. and Ralph E. Mr. Orcutt is...

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Biography of Rev. Samuel Parker

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now REV. SAMUEL PARKER. – Mr. Parker was not a pioneer to settle in this country, nor to engage in missionary work, but was a pioneer of pioneers, a “John The Baptist,” to prepare the way for missionaries and emigrants. He was born at Ashfield, Massachusetts, April 23, 1779, and was the son of Elisha and Thankful M. Parker. In 1806 he graduated from Williams College, and from Andover Theological Seminary in the first class that left that institution. He immediately went west to New York, and engaged in home missionary work. He was ordained as a Congregational minister at Danby, New York, November 12, 1812, and was married first to Miss H. Sears shortly afterwards. But she soon died; and in 1815 he was married to Miss Jerusha Lord, who was the mother of his three children, – Mrs. J. Van Kirk and Doctor S.J. Parker of Ithaca, New York, and Professor H.W. Parker of Grinnell College, Iowa. He labored most of the time at Danby, Ithaca and Apulia, New York, and Middlefield, Massachusetts until 1833. At that time the request of the four Nez Perces who went to St. Louis in search of the white man’s bible was made public; and on April 10, 1833, he offered himself to the American Board of Commissioners for...

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John Wright Genealogy

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John Wright m. Mary and res. Dunstable. Benjamin2 Wright, son of John1, b. at Dunstable, d. Milford, N. H., res. at Mile Slip (afterwards Milford); m. Betsey Adams of Dunstable (now Nashua). Of their eleven children eight were b. in Mile Slip, and the last three in Milford: Benjamin, b. May 20, 1775; d. Sept. 19, 1777. Benjamin; Betsey; Ira; Joel, 1, b. Jan. 26, 1784; Oliver; Sally; Mary; Lydia; Nehemiah and Gratia. Joel3 Wright, son of Benjamin2, was the fifth minister and third settled pastor of the First Cong. Church of S. See page 409. According to the Milford, N. H. records, he was b. Jan. 26, other authorities give it Jan. 27, 1784. Res. in the old Muzzey house while in S.; he was an invalid the last ten years of his life and died at South Hadley, Mass., June 8, 1859; m. Lucy W. Grosvenor, b. Paxton, Mass., Dec. 8, 1785; d. Fond DuLac, Wis., Oct. 18, 1861; dau. of Rev. Daniel and Deborah (Hall) Grosvenor of Petersham, Mass. Ch.: Daniel Grosvenor4, b. Leverett, Mass., Sept. 22, 1813, d. in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Dec. 29, 1897; m. May 25, 1836, Aletta Van Brunt; dau. of Jeremiah of New Utrecht, L. I. In Sullivan he lived where Mrs. Amos Wardwell recently lived. He was...

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Biography of Edgar Marvin Graves

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now EDGAR MARVIN GRAVES, born and reared in the town of Greenfield, is working his way to fame as a business man of this town. More often than otherwise the young man will leave his native hearth to seek his fortune in a larger town or city, when, if he had used his eyes he would have seen opportunity beckoning him at his very door. This was not the case with Edgar M. Graves, however, for he saw opportunities in his own town and made use of them until today he is recognized as the owner of a prosperous electrical business. The Graves family is one of the most ancient in England, and is represented by many men of honor and distinction. of interest to his family and friends is the line of ancestry here traced: Thomas Graves, born in England before 1585, came to New England with his wife, Sarah, and five children, the youngest of whom at that time was about sixteen years of age. They settled in Hartford, Connecticut, where Thomas was a property holder in 1645. Being over sixty years of age, he was exempted from training in the militia. In September, 1661, he moved to Hatfield. His death occurred in November, 1662, and his son, Isaac was appointed administrator of his estate...

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Biographical Sketch of Otis B. Gunn

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Otis B. Gunn was a native of Massachusetts, born at Montague, October 27, 1828, and before he came west as a railroad engineer, had served as rodman on the Hoosac Tunnel Railroad and superintendent of the construction work of the line between Rochester and Niagara Falls. In 1853 he was appointed division engineer in the building of the Toledo, Wabash and Western, and followed railroad construction westward until he settled at Wyandotte, Kansas, in 1857. He was a member of the 1861 State Senate, and while thus serving was appointed major of the Fourth Kansas, later the Tenth Kansas Infantry. Resigning in May, 1862, he resumed railroad work, being connected, at varions times, with the Kansas City and Cameron, Leavenworth, Pawnee and Western Central Branch of the Union Pacific, and the Missouri, Kansas and Texas. Of the road last named he built 600 miles; also constructed the bridge across the Missouri River at Atehison, and in 1876 constructed the union depot in Kansas City. In view of these unadorned facts, it is perhaps needless to add that Mr. Gunn was one of the leading engineers of the West. He died in Kansas City, February 18, 1901, and was buried in Oak Grove,...

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Biographical Sketch of Aiken, David Aiken

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Aiken, David, son of Phinehas and Elisabeth (Patterson) Aiken, was born at Bedford, Hillsborough County, N. H., June 7, 1804. His early education was obtained in a common district school and at Pembroke Academy, under Mr. John Vose, and at Phillips Academy, Andover, under Mr. John Adams. He entered Dartmouth College, where he was graduated in 1830. He then studied law with Wells & Alvord at Greenfield, Mass., and was admitted to the Massachusetts bar in 1833; was judge of the court of common pleas from 1856 to ’59. He has been the law partner of Henry Chapman, George Grennell, Davis & Allen, Chester C. Conant, and W. S. B. Hopkins, afterwards with Charles E. Forbes of Northampton. He is now partner with his son, John A. Aiken, but retired from active practice when the State sold its interest in the Troy & Greenfield and Hoosac Tunnel Railroad—he having acted as legal adviser to its manager up to that time, in behalf of the Commonwealth. He was senator from Franklin County in 1874. From the promotion of Judge Wells in 1844 to the present day, with the exception of the period he himself was on the bench, Judge Aiken has been the acknowledged leader of the county bar. He was married in October 1844, to Lydia...

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Biographical Sketch of Allen, Charles

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Allen, Charles, son of Sylvester and Harriet (Ripley) Allen, was born in Greenfield, Franklin county, April 17, 1827. He was graduated from Harvard in the class of 1847. He was admitted to the bar in 1850. He practiced law in Greenfield until 1862, and then moved to Boston. He was appointed by Governor John D. Long justice of the supreme judicial court, which position he now holds. Judge Allen was reporter of decisions of the supreme judicial court from 1861 to 1867. He was attorney general of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 1867 to 1872. In 1880 he was appointed one of the commissioner to revise the general statutes. Judge Allen was never...

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Biography of Allen, Nathaniel Topliff

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Allen, Nathaniel Topliff, son of Ellis and Lucy (Lane) Allen, was born in Medfield, Norfolk County, Sept. 29, 1823. His native homestead farm has been owned and tilled by seven generations of Allens, noted for longevity, sterling common-sense, and rugged worth; and there, during his boyhood, the subject of this sketch followed the pursuits of his ancestors, and laid the foundation of a vigorous constitution. Three years of his minority were spent in a Waltham cotton mill, where he acquired a knowledge of textile manufacture; he also received a good common-school education in the public schools, a family school kept by Rev. Joseph Allen at Northborough, and Northfield Academy. Having chosen to become a teacher, he continued his studies in the Bridgewater state normal school, and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute at Troy, N. Y. He afterwards taught in the various public schools of Mansfield, Northborough, Northfield and Shrewsbury, until the spring of 1848, when he was appointed by Horace Mann, of the state board of education, to take charge of the model department of the normal school at West Newton. This position he filled with marked ability for nearly six years, when he established in connection with Rev. Cyrus Pierce, father of American normal schools, the institution of which he is now principal—the West Newton English and...

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Biographical Sketch of Aldrich, P. Emory

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Aldrich, P. Emory, was born in New Salem, Franklin County. His ancestors came from England in 1635, residing at first in Dorchester and Braintree, and afterwards settling in Mendon, Worcester County. After obtaining his early education at the public schools, he fitted for college at the Shelburne Falls Academy, and in private study mastered a collegiate education. He studied law while engaged in teaching at the South, and later attended the Harvard law school. In 1845 he was admitted to the bar in Richmond, Va., but the following year returned to Massachusetts, and after studying for six months with Chapman, Ashmun & Norton, in Springfield, he was admitted to practice in the courts of the State. He began practice in Barre, where he remained for seven years, for three years editing the “Barre Patriot.” He was sent as a delegate to the Convention of 1853 for the revision of the state constitution, and the same year Governor Clifford appointed him district attorney for the middle district, which office he held till 1866. Removing to Worcester in 1854, he became a partner of Hon. P. C. Bacon. In 1862 he was elected mayor of Worcester, declining a re-election. He was sent as a representative to the Legislature in 1866-’67, and for three years after its organization he...

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Biography of Judge W. I. Wallace

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now JUDGE W. I. WALLACE. Biography should be written for the sake of its lessons; that men everywhere may place themselves in contact with facts and affairs, and build themselves up to and into a life of excellence, where they may keep and augment their individuality. For this reason a sketch of Judge W. I. Wallace is here given, his career having been both honorable and useful. He was born in the Green Mountains, Franklin County, Mass., December 25, 1840, his parents being Zebina and Lucinda (French) Wallace, who were of Scotch-Irish lineage. The Wallaces trace their genealogical ancestry back to the earliest colonists immigrating to Massachusetts. The paternal grandfather, Seth Wallace, was born in that State, but became an early settler of the Empire State, where he followed the occupation of farming, a calling which received the attention of most of the members of his family. He had fought his country’s battles as a soldier of the Revolution, during which time he was noted for his bravery and faithfulness to the Colonial cause. Zebina Wallace resided in Vermont until 1859, then moved to Dane County, Wisconsin, where he became the owner and resided on a farm near Madison until his death, which occurred in 1881. He learned the trade of tanning in his youth, but his...

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Biography of Augustus G. Upton, A. M., D. D.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Although Dr. Upton has been a resident of Weiser for little more than three years he has been so closely and prominently connected with the educational and moral interests of the town during that time that no history of the community would be complete without the record of his career. It is a widely acknowledged fact that the most important work to which man can direct his energies is that of teaching, whether it be from the pulpit, from the lecture platform or from the schoolroom. Its primary object is ever the same, the development of one’s latent powers that the duties of life may be bravely met and well performed. The intellectual and the moral nature are so closely allied that it is difficult to instruct one without in a measure influencing the other, and certainly the best results are accomplished when the work goes hand in hand. Christian instruction is having an influence over the world that few can estimate, for it is in youth that the life of the man is marked out, his future course decided and his choice as to the good or evil made. It is to this work of thus instructing the young that Dr. Upton devotes his time, energies and thought, and as the president of the Weiser...

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