Location: France

Joseph B. Woodleaf

Private 1st Class, Co. F, 42nd Div., 165th Reg.; of Wake County; son of Henry C. and Mrs. Pattie Irene Woodleaf; born April 12, 1894. Entered service May 25, 1918, at Wake Forest, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, then to Camp Sevier, then to Camp Upton. Sailed for France July 31, 1918. Fought at St. Mihiel and Argonne Forest. Killed at Argonne Forest Oct. 17, 1918. Buried in France where he...

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Preston Woodard

Private, Co. D, 119th Inf., 30th Div. Born in Johnston County; son of E. and Mrs. Nellie Woodard. Entered service Oct. 6, 1917, at Pine Level, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, from there to Camp Sevier, transferred to Camp Merritt. Went to France May 20, 1918. Fought in all engagements until killed Oct. 10, 1918, with 119th Inf. Buried in...

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Edward C. Harris

2nd Lt., M. G. Co., 81st Div. 321st Inf. Born in Vance County; son of Edward W. and Meta Earl Harris. Entered service April, 1917, at Wendell, N.C. Went to Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga. Sailed for France Aug. 5, 1918. Wounded in France Nov. 11, 1918. Died Nov. 12, 1918. An exceptionally brave officer. Carried his machine gun through wire entanglement and put it in position under violent fire from three enemy machine guns. Fatally wounded, but commanded his men to leave him and continue fighting. Received Croix de Guerre with Palm and D. S. Cross for heroism at Grimancourt, France. Graduated from Trinity College,...

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John M. Facette

Sergt. Maj., Hdqrs. Co., 120th Inf., 30th Div. Born in Durham County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Facette. Entered the service Aug. 15, 1917, and was sent to Camp Sevier, S. C., from there to Camp Merritt. Sailed for France May 17, 1918. Was in all battles until killed on the Hindenburg Line Sept. 29, 1918. Buried in...

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Clifton Henry Rawles

Private, Co. F, 30th Div., 120th Reg. Born in Edgecombe County; son of G. W. and Mrs. E. T. Rawles. Entered service July 1, 1917, at Tarboro, N.C. Sent to camp at Greenville. Sailed for France, May 12, 1918, Fought in all battles in France and Belgium with his regiment. Killed in France. Buried near Mont Bohean. Killed Oct. 9th, about 1:00 P. M., while making an advance, was caught in a machine gun barrage, hit in breast by machine gun bullets and killed...

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Travis Thompson

Private 1st Class, Co. D, 119th Inf., 30th Div. Son of B. M. and Daisy Thompson, of Stanly County. Entered service in 1918 at Lexington, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., and later sailed for France, where he was killed in battle on July 22, 1918. Buried in...

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Foster C. Davis

Bugler, Inf., Mach. Gun Co., 30th Div., 120th Reg. Born in Wake county; son of Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Davis. Entered the service June 2, 1917, at Wake Forest, N.C. Sent to Camp Sevier. Sailed for France May 25th, 1918. Bugler when entered service. Fought at Ypres, Bellicourt, Hindenburg Line. Was on guard duty when killed during the Hindenburg Drive, Oct. 10, 1919. He was a survivor of a torpedoed British ship. He was the author of “A Call of the...

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Biography of Anton Diebolt, Jr.

Anton Diebolt, Jr., cashier of the Piqua State Bank in Woodson County, is one of the younger bankers of Kansas and had studied and practiced banking with a varied experience in different institutions ever since reaching manhood. He is a native of Kansas and represents a family that have had an important share in business and financial circles. He was born in Atchison County, Kansas, October 10, 1885, a son of Anton Diebolt, Sr., and a grandson of Joseph Diebolt. The Diebolt family in the earlier generations lived in the Province of Alsace, on the border between the French and German empires, and alternately a French and then a German possession. Joseph Diebolt was born in Alsace when it was part of France, and in his earlier life he saw active service in the regular French army. In 1862 he came to America, locating in Brown County, Kansas, and lived the life of a pioneer farmer there until his death. Anton Diebolt, Sr., was born in 1832, in Alsace, France, and was a boy of sixteen when he left his native land in 1848 and immigrated to the United States. He landed at New Orleans, and spent twelve years in that southern city, having a varied experience in different lines of business. For two years he lived at Cincinnati, Ohio, and then removed to Mendota, Illinois, and engaged in...

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Biography of Peter J. Filano

Peter J. Filano, residing three miles south of San Bernardino, is one of the oldest and most prosperous pioneers in the valley. He was born in the southern part of France, November 4, 1820, the oldest of a family of three children. When a young man he went to Africa, and for nine years engaged in the slave trade on the east and west coasts. In 1845 he sailed from Maca to China and took slaves, then from China to Salem, Massachusetts. He followed the sea for fifteen years. In 1848 he sailed from New York to New Orleans, and thence to St. Louis, from St. Louis to Council Bluffs by steamer, and there wintered. In the spring of 1849 he crossed by ox team to Salt Lake City, where he wintered, and the next spring started across the plains to California. Their train consisted of fifty-two wagons, under Captain Foote. They had a very prosperous journey, and in September 1852, they all arrived safely in San Bernardino, when there was but one building (the fort) in the place. His first purchase of land was 225 acres, where he has since been engaged as a general farmer and stock-raiser. He owned at one time 1,000 or more acres of land and kept several thousand fine sheep and cattle. He paid $5 per acre for his land and built the...

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Biographical Sketch of John Frary

Edward Harrison Frary, who served with bravery in many of the engagements of the civil war, inherited his gallantry from a long line of ancestors who fought with credit in defense of their country. His father was a colonel of the New York State Militia, his maternal grandfather served in the war of 1812, his maternal great-grandfather served in the revolutionary war, and a number of his ancestors on the paternal side were soldiers in the revolution. (1) John Frary, immigrant ancestor of this family, came to America from England, in 1638, and settled at Dedham, Massachusetts. The family originally lived in France, from which country they were driven by religious persecution at the time of the massacre of St. Bartholomew (Ref. “Genealogical Dictionary of New England” and “Adjutant Goss’ Records”)...

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King William’s War

King William¬ís War (the first of the French and Indian Wars) began in New England as an extension of the war between England and France, when in July 1689 the French governor of Canada incited the Indians to brutally attack Dover, N.H., then known as Cochecho. By then, according to the letters of Edmund Andros, governor of New England, Maine had already been deeply embroiled in the conflict for a year. In June 1689, several hundred Abenaki and Pennacook Indians under the command of Kancamagus and Mesandowit raided Dover, New Hampshire, killing more than 20 and taking 29 captives, who were sold into captivity in New France. Jean-Vincent d’Abbadie de Saint-Castin, a Frenchman whose home on Penobscot Bay (near present-day Castine, Maine, named for him) had been plundered by Governor Andros in 1688, led an Abenaki war party to raid Pemaquid in August 1689. Also in August 1689, 1,500 Iroquois attacked the French settlement at Lachine before New France had even learned of the start of the war. Frontenac later attacked the Iroquois village of Onondaga. New France and its Indian allies then attacked English frontier settlements, most notably the Schenectady Massacre of 1690. The Treaty of Ryswick in 1697 ended the war between the two colonial powers, reverting the colonial borders to the status quo ante bellum. The peace did not last long, and within five years, the...

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Biography of George Herrall

GEORGE HERRALL. – This prominent figure in the business circles of the metropolis of the Pacific Northwest, the connections of whose house are co-extensive with the mercantile interests of the whole boundless Pacific coast and western world, and the designation of whose industrial activity is imprinted universally in all our Pacific Northwestern commonwealths, dates the hour of his nativity to the year 1832, and looks back far across the water to the populous state of Baden, a potent political unit in the vast empire of Germany, to the scenes of his birthplace, childhood, youth and early manhood; for it was there that he imbibed the principles of industry, thrift, perseverance, economy and shrewdness for which his countrymen and the people of his vast nationality have from the most remote times been distinguished. There, by the wise counsels of his father, and by the sagacious choices of his own as yet immature but nevertheless penetrating mind, he was thriftily set to learn the trade of brewing and of coopering, thus laying the foundation for the golden reward that was to await him in our metropolis of the Northwest. In 1850 he went to France, working at his trade. In 1853, leaving the narrow bounds and crowded life of the old world, he crossed the broad ocean to the majestic shores of America, the land for the enterprising, shrewd and noble...

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Biographical Sketch of Peter Gobert

Peter Gobert farmer, and stock-raiser, S. 19; P. O. Oakland; one of the pioneers of Coles Co.; born in France Oct. 17, 1821, where he attended school until 11 years of age, when he emigrated with his parents to America, landing in New York the spring of 1832; going to Buffalo, he assisted his father upon a farm until 16 years of age, when he emigrated West in the spring, coming by way of the lakes to Chicago, arriving there June 11, 1837; coming directly to Coles Co., they located in what is now known as East Oakland Tp., before the organization of the same; here he engaged with his father farming until 1860, when his father retired from active labor, and Mr. Gobert assumed the management of the farm; he owns his brick residence, with good stables and other buildings, and upward of 400 acres of land, all under cultivation except twenty-five acres of timber. He married, June 8, 1843, Melinda R. Ashmore; she was born in Kentucky March 22, 1824; she died Feb. 21, 1861, leaving five children now living, viz., Samuel, Charles, Louis, La Fayette, Virginia. His marriage with Matilda A. Roberts was celebrated Oct. 17, 1861; she was born in Ohio, June 26, 1835; they have four children now living by this union, viz., Alice, Thomas, Napoleon, Frank. Mr. Gobert drove an ox team from...

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Biographical Sketch of Sutter, Edward

Sutter, Edward a native of France, born February 6, 1858. Went to Locle, Switzerland, with his brother Emile, and learned the same trade, but Edward came to America in 1876 and located in Wooster, Ohio, remaining there a year. Then he came to Kirwin, Kan., where he engaged in the jewelry business, and thence he came to Russell. He is unmarried. Members of the Russell Lodge, A. O. U....

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Biographical Sketch of Sutter, Emile

Sutter, Emile was born in France, October 1, 1855, learned the trade of watchmaker and jeweler in Locle, Switzerland, came to America in 1879, and located in Russell, Kan. Edward & Emile Sutter, dealers in musical instruments, watches, clocks and jewelry. They opened business in March of 1879, and carry a general stock of $600. He was married May 20, 1876, to Miss Laura Amanda Marchand, a native of Switzerland. They have three children Henry E., Lina and Jennie. Edward. Members of the Russell Lodge, A. O. U....

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