Location: Fort Smith Arkansas

Fort Smith (Westark) Junior College Yearbooks 1929-2003

The Boreham Library at the University of Arkansas – Fort Smith, enabled 72 copies of the university yearbooks to be digitized and made freely available online, 1929-2003. The yearbooks during this period was known as the “Pioneer” and “Nuna”. Yearbooks provide a window into student life. From sports teams to clubs, fashions to hairstyles, these volumes document the changing attitudes and culture of college students year by year.

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North America Indian Names of Places in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, and Louisiana

The Indians all over this continent had names, traditions, religions, ceremonies, feasts, prayers, songs, dances all, more or less, with symbolism and allegory, adapted to circumstances, just as all other races of mankind. But the world has become so familiar with the continued and ridiculous publications in regard to everything touching upon that race of people that a universal doubt has long since been created and established as to the possibility of refinement of thought and nobleness of action ever having existed among the North American Indian race, ancient or modern; and so little of truth has also been learned regarding the real and true inner life of that peculiar and seemingly isolated race of mankind, that today only here and there can one be found who, from a lifetime association and intimate acquaintance, is well versed in Indian thought, feeling and character, and able to unfold and record the solution of that imagined mystery known as “The Indian Problem,” since they learned it from the Indians themselves. From the Indians own lips they were taught its elucidation, and only as it could be taught and learned, but never again can be taught and learned. Even as various nations of antiquity of, the eastern continent have left the evidences of their former occupation by the geographical names that still exist, so to have the North American Indians left their...

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The Cherokee Revolt – Indian Wars

From the removal of the Cherokee Indians from Georgia and Tennessee to Arkansas and their establishment upon the reservation allotted to them by treaty with the Government in Arkansas, they have, until the period of this outbreak to the narrative of which this chapter is devoted, been considered as among the least dangerous and most peaceable of the tribes in that region. But through various causes, chief among which has been notably the introduction among them of a horde of those pests of the West the border ruffians; these half wild, half-breed Nomads were encouraged by these Indians, as it appeared, for the sake of the liquor traffic. According to the official accounts of this attempt to reopen hostilities, it appears that on the 11th of April, 1872, it originated with a man named J. J. Kesterson, living in the Cherokee nation, near the Arkansas line, about fifty miles from Little Rock. On that day he went to Little Rock, and filed information against one Proctor, also a white man, married to a Cherokee woman, for assaulting with intent to kill him while in his saw mill, on the 13th of February. Proctor fired a revolver at Kesterson, the ball striking him just above the left eye, but before he could fire again Kesterson escaped. Proctor, at the time, was under indictment in the Snake District for the murder of his...

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Fort Smith Criminal Records

Fort Smith Criminal Records: This series consists of criminal court cases, and contains such material as indictments, bills of information, arrest warrants, writs, subpoenas, appearance bonds, transcripts of proceedings before U.S. commissioners, orders, verdicts, judgments, sentencing orders, and appeal papers. In these records can be found the criminal cases of such famous outlaws as Belle, Sam, Tom, and Henry Starr (jacket 170); Wyatt Earp (jacket 59); Gad and Emmet Dalton (jacket 55); Rufus Buck (jacket 500); Edgar Watson (jacket 197); Blue Duck (jacket 26); and “Cherokee Bill” Goldsby (jacket 500).

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Biographical Sketch of John M. Taylor

(See Foreman) –John Manchester, son of James Madison, born April 18, 1818, and died January 7, 1907, and Addle (Manchester) Taylor was born Aug. 14, 1860, in Cherokee County, North Carolina, and was educated in the Cumberland Presbyterian College, Louden, Tennessee, and at Atlanta, Georgia. Married at Claremore, Thursday, February 23, 1893, Bertha E. McCutchan, daughter of Samuel and Margaret McCutchan, born November 29, 1872, at Redoak, Charlotte County,Virginia and was educated in Missouri. They are the parents of Blaine Samuel, born June 25, 1894; Robert Clinton, born July 24, 1897; served during the World war in the Medical Corps; Florence Thelma, born August 17, 1902; McCutchan, born November 28, 1904; Oklahoma, born November 6, 1906, and John Manchester Taylor, born November 8, 1909. David Taylor, born December 16, 1791, to Orange County, Virginia, married Mary Ann Bigby, born August 9, 1802, and they were the parents of James Madison Taylor, who married Addie Manchester, a native of Providence, R.I. John Manchester Taylor, whose Cherokee name is Katahya, is a thirty-second degree Mason, Shriner and Elk. Attorney for the Cherokees, Creeks and Seminoles. Was U. S. Deputy Marshal for the Fort Smith Court for twenty-three years; Indian Police twelve years; Deputy Sheriff five years; Postal Inspector three years; Assistant Solicitor of Cooweescoowee District eight years; United States Commissioner 4 years and Master in...

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Biography of Randall Solon Tilles, M. D.

The broad field of medicine offers a wonderful opportunity since science has brought to light so many truths and such broad knowledge that the profession has become highly specialized. Concentrating his efforts upon obstetrics and gynecology, Dr. Randall Solon Tilles has gained a position of prominence in his chosen field. He was born at Fort Smith, Arkansas, March 8, 1883, and is a son of David Tilles, a native of that state and of German descent, the family being founded in America by Solomon Titles, who came to the new world in 1855 and originally settled at Little Rock, Arkansas, where he engaged in the manufacture of cigars. He was a Confederate veteran of the Civil war. The father is now a retired merchant of Fort Smith, Arkansas. He married Carrie Erb, who was born at Little Rock, Arkansas, and is also of German lineage, her people having come to the new world in the ’50s, the progenitor of the family on this side of the Atlantic being Adolphus Erb, who engaged in mercantile business here. To Mr. and Mrs. David Tilles have been born three children: Randall S.; Roy Erb, a manufacturer of New York city; and Clio, the wife of D. E. Levy, of New York city. Dr. Tilles obtained a public school education in Fort Smith, Arkansas, and prepared for his professional career in the Washington...

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Biography of C. W. Copeland

C. W. Copeland. A veteran in the ice business, C. W. Copeland is president of the Belleville Lee and Cold Storage Company. He is one of the leading business men and citizens of that thriving city. The Belleville Ice and Cold Storage Company was incorporated January 15, 1915, with Mr. Copeland as president and with G. H. Bramwell as secretary and W. K. Bramwell as treasurer. This plant had a capacity for the manufacture of twenty-five tons of ice per day, and had storage capacity for 5,000 tons. The plant, eligibly situated on the Rock Island Railroad tracks, covers 90 by 170 feet of ground, and is modern in every point of equipment. The company employs about seven hands during most of the season, and their ice is manufactured from an unfailing supply of pure water, drawn from a 145-foot well. Mr. Copeland had spent twenty-two years in the ice industry and had also had a wide experience in other lines of business. He was born in Danville, Virginia, in 1868, and represents an old Southern family. His parents were William N. and Eleanor F. Copeland. His father was a Confederate soldier during the war between the states. Reared and liberally educated in his native state, C. W. Copeland came West in 1889 and his mature career had been identified principally with the states of Arkansas, Missouri and Kansas....

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Biography of John F. Chandler

John F. Chandler, an automobile dealer of Muskogee, was born near Fayetteville, Washington county, Arkansas, September 26, 1861. His parents were Preston and Bathsheba (Bartlett) Chandler, natives of Arkansas and Kentucky respectively. The grandfather in the paternal line was one of the earliest of the pioneer settlers of Arkansas and in that state Preston Chandler was reared and educated. After attaining adult age he became a farmer, purchasing land a mile from his father’s place and continuing the cultivation of his fields throughout his remaining days. He served with the Union army throughout the Civil war, while his brothers were members of the Confederate army. Both Preston Chandler and his wife have passed away. John F. Chandler pursued his education in the schools of Washington county, Arkansas, and remained with his parents through the period of early manhood, contributing to the support of the family in large measure for several years. He then went to Fort Smith, Arkansas, and became a steamboat pilot, although he had never seen a boat when he went there. He remained for eight years and in 1893 came to Muskogee, Oklahoma, where he entered the employ of the Turner Hardware Company. While thus employed he traveled horseback throughout this section of the country, making collections for the firm and fixing up commercial paper for the company. He afterward became credit manager for the house,...

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Biography of Jefferson D. Cox

Jefferson D. Cox is actively connected with a profession that has important bearing upon the progress and stable prosperity of every community, and one in which advancement depends upon individual merit and ability. Ability becomes in a measure prominence, and that Mr. Cox occupies a leading position in the ranks of the legal profession is an indication of his learning and skill in his chosen field. He is also a successful stock man and he owns a large ranch where fancy Duroc hogs and Durham cattle are raised. Jefferson D. Cox was born in Walhalla, South Carolina, on the 1st of October, 1861, a son of Harmon and Adaline (Landreth)Cox, both natives of that state. For many years the father engaged in farming and the conduct of a cooperage business in his native state but in 1868 he removed with his family to Mountain Home, Arkansas. Here he resumed his trade and also farmed, achieving a substantial success and becoming one of the representative and progressive citizens of the community. He died in 1874. His widow survived him until 1909. In the acquirement of an education Jefferson D. Cox attended the public schools of Mountain Home, Arkansas, and was graduated from the high school at Valley Springs. Subsequently he took a business course in the Gaskill Business College at Jersey City, New Jersey, and upon the completion of his studies...

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Biography of Wiley Terry Wisdom

Wiley Terry Wisdom, Vice President of the Exchange National Bank of Muskogee, was born in Jackson, Tennessee, February 22, 1875. His father, Colonel Dew M. Wisdom, was born at Medon, Madison County, Tennessee, February 3, 1836, and was a son of William S. and Jane (Anderson) Wisdom. The grandfather was born in Rockingham county, North Carolina, in 1796, and when Colonel Wisdom was still an infant he was taken by his parents to McNairy county, Tennessee. He completed his education in the Cumberland University at Lebanon and is numbered among its alumni of 1857. He early took up the study of Latin and in his college days studied Greek and French. He prepared for the bar as a student in Cumberland University and after being admitted to practice he opened an office in Purdy, Tennessee, where he followed his profession until the outbreak of the Civil war. He was unanimously chosen a member of the proposed constitutional convention which was never called into session, however, as the proposition was defeated by popular vote. When active hostilities began between the north and the south he joined Company F, Thirteenth Tennessee Volunteer Infantry, and was with the Confederate forces as a first lieutenant under Captain John V. Wright, whom he succeeded in the Captaincy when the latter was promoted to the rank of Colonel. While commanding his company at Belmont, Captain...

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Biography of David Lee Stokes

For forty-one years David Lee Stokes has been a resident of Oklahoma and after many years of activity as an agriculturist he is now living retired in Bartlesville in the enjoyment of a good income, gained through untiring industry, perseverance and intelligently directed effort during his earlier years. He was born in Marshfield, Missouri, January 12, 1866, his parents being Granville and Pheobia (Haymes) Stokes, who established their home in the Indian Territory, in what is now Washington county, Oklahoma, in 1880, becoming early settlers of this region. The father leased a tract of land four miles northwest of Bartlesville, which he brought to a high state of development, also devoting his energies to stock raising, and he continued in that business until his death, which occurred in 1895, while the mother passed away in 1908. The property is still known as the Stokes farm and remained the home of some member of the family continuously from 1880 until 1921, when the last occupant of the place took up her residence in Dewey. On starting out in life for himself David L. Stokes also turned his attention to agricultural pursuits and in 1892 leased a tract of land on what is now the town site of Ramona, in Washington county. He gradually added to his holdings until he had under cultivation eleven hundred acres of rich and arable land,...

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Biography of Clarence William Turner

From the pioneer epoch in the history of Oklahoma’s development along industrial and commercial lines the name of Turner has been associated with mercantile interests. It has been inseparably interwoven with the annals of trade that stands for a dominant progressiveness, resulting largely in the up building of Muskogee. Clarence William Turner, whose name introduces this review, was born in Cleveland, Ohio, June 18, 1857, and comes of English ancestry, the founder of the family in the new world being John Turner, who crossed the Atlantic from England and became a resident of Canandaigua, Ontario county, New York, where in 1798 was born his son, William Turner, the first white child born at that place. After reaching maturity William Turner left New York and became a pioneer resident of Cuyahoga county, Ohio, while subsequently he established his home in Allen county, Indiana, there remaining to the time of his demise. His son, John E. Turner, was born in Wickliffe, Ohio, August 15, 1824. He spent his youthful days in Cuyahoga County, that state, and in his later years came to the Indian Territory, where he figured prominently for many years in connection with commercial pursuits. He was married in Ohio to Julia Ayers, who was born in Bristol, that state, in December, 1828, and both reached an advanced age, the death of John E. Turner occurring in a hospital...

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Biography of H. B. Rodecker

H. B. Rodecker, an enterprising and successful druggist of Ramona, was born near Eureka, Illinois, on the 22d of August, 1874, and was taken by his parents, William B. and Leona (Hellen) Rodecker, to Newton, Harvey county, Kansas, in 1880. The mother is a niece of the late Cecil Rhodes, multi-millionaire and statesman of South Africa. The father was a tinner by trade and followed that pursuit until 1889, when the family removed to Oklahoma City and he entered the employ of W. J. Pettie, a hardware merchant, conducting a business that has since been developed into a large wholesale enterprise. Mr. Rodecker was associated with the house for six years and then went to Los Angeles, where he is now living retired. He passed the seventy-seventh milestone on life’s journey on the 30th of March, 1922. He makes his home with his son, F. E., who is engaged in the grocery business in southern California. Mr. Rodecker was born in Peoria, Illinois, while his wife was born at the wharf in New York harbor, when her parents landed from England. She died at Shawnee, Oklahoma, February 14, 1904. The only daughter of the family, Lulu Mable Rodecker, died in Shawnee in 1903. H. B. Rodecker attended the public schools of Newton and was graduated from the high school with the class of 1888. Later he took up the...

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Biography of Dale B. Whybark

Dale B. Whybark who originated from Kansas, was born at Lane, in August, 1887, and is a son of George S. and Mary R. (Walters) Whybark, both natives of that state. The father, who has always followed railroading, is now Superintendent of the Arkansas Central Railroad at Fort Smith, which responsible position he has held for many years. Dale B. Whybark was reared and educated in Fort Smith and after graduating from the high school there, accepted a position with the Drew Hardwood Lumber Company at De Kalb, Texas, remaining in their employ until 1908, when he came to Eufaula. He became cashier of the First National Bank here, and was active in that capacity until 1918, when he bought a controlling interest in the Oklahoma State Bank from H. B. Ernest and became President of the institution. This bank was established in 1916 by Mr. Ernest, and the modern bank building, owned by the institution, was built in the same year. It has a capital of twenty-five thousand dollars, a surplus also amounting to twenty-five thousand dollars, and the average deposits total four hundred thousand dollars. M. E. Turner is Vice President of the institution and M. S. Fears holds the position of cashier. There is no phase of the banking business with which Mr. Whybark is not familiar and he has won the enviable position he now...

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Biography of Hon. Samuel Morton Rutherford

Samuel Morton Rutherford has always been keenly alive to his duties and responsibilities as a man and citizen and through the avenue of his profession has done much to uphold the legal and moral status of his community. Residing in Muskogee, he is recognized as one of the eminent members of the bar of this section of the state, attaining high position in a calling where advancement depends entirely upon individual merit and ability. Samuel M. Rutherford is indebted to the public school system of Fort Smith, Arkansas, for his early educational privileges and later he enjoyed the benefit of instruction in the Emory and Henry College, being numbered among its Bachelor of Arts alumni of 1883. His law studies were pursued also in Fort Smith and after thorough preliminary training he was admitted to the bar. He entered at once upon the active work of his profession but within a short time was appointed under sheriff of his county in 1884, filling the position until 1892, when he removed to Atoka, then in Indian Territory, and for two years occupied the position of United States commissioner. His life for several years thereafter was devoted to public service and his labors were of a most beneficial character. He was United States marshal for the Northern District of Indian Territory from 1895 until the early part of 1898. On the...

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