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Location: Fort Gibson Oklahoma

Slave Narrative of George Kye

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: George Kye Location: Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Age: 110 I was born in Arkansas under Mr. Abraham Stover, on a big farm about twenty miles north of Van Buren. I was plumb grown when the Civil War come along, but I can remember back when the Cherokee Indians was in all that part of the country Joe Kye was my pappy’s name what he was born under back is Garrison County, Virginia, and I took that name when I was freed, but I don’t know whether he took it or not because he was sold off by old Master Stover when I was a child. I never have seen him since. I think he wouldn’t mind good, leastways that what my mammy say. My mammy was named Jennie and I don’t think I had any brothers or sisters, but they was a whole lot of children at the quarters that I played and lived with. I didn’t live with mammy because she worked all the time, and us children all stayed in one house. It was a little one room log cabin, chinked and daubed, and you couldn’t stir us with a stick. When we went to eat we had a big pan and all ate out of it. One what ate the fastest got...

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Slave Narrative of Morris Sheppard

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Morris Sheppard Location: Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Date of Birth: November, 1852 Age: 85 Old Master tell me I was borned in November 1852, at de old home place about five miles east of Webbers Falls, mebbe kind of northeast, not far from de east bank of de Illinois River. Master’s name was Joe Sheppard, and he was a Cherokee Indian. Tall and slin and handsome. He had black eyes and mustache but his hair was iron gray, and everybody liked him because he was so good-natured and kind. I don’t remember old Mistress’ name. My mammy was a Crossland Negro before she come to belong to Master Joe and marry my pappy, and I think she come wid old Mistress and belong to her. Old Mistress was small and mighty pretty too, and she was only half Cherokee. She inherit about half a dozen slaws, and say dey was her own and old Master can’t sell one unless she give him leave to do it. Dey only had two families of slaves wid about twenty in all, and dey only worked about fifty acres, so we sure did work every foot of it good. We git three or four crops of different things out of dat farm every year. and something growing on dat...

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Slave Narrative of Mary Grayson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Mary Grayson Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Age: 83 I am what we colored people call a “native.” That means that I didn’t come into the Indian country from somewhere in the Old South, after the war, like so many Negroes did, but I was born here in the old Creek Nation, and my master was a Creek Indian. That was eighty three years ago, so I am told. My mammy belonged to white people back in Alabama when she was born, down in the southern part I think, for she told me that after she was a sizeable girl her white people moved into the eastern part of Alabama where there was a lot of Creeks. Some of them Creeks was mixed up with the whites, and some of the big men in the Creeks who come to talk to her master was almost white, it looked like. “My white folks moved around a lot when I was a little girl”, she told me. When mammy was about 10 or 12 years old some of the Creeks begun to come out to the Territory in little bunches. They wasn’t the ones who was taken out here by the soldiers and contractor men, they come on ahead by themselves and most of them had plenty of...

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Slave Narrative of Harriett Robinson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Harriet Robinson Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Bastrop, Texas Date of Birth: September 1, 1842 Age: 95 I was born close to Webbers Falls, in the Canadian District of the Cherokee Nation, in the same year that my pappy was blowed up and killed in the big boat accident that killed my old Master. I never did see my daddy excepting when I was a baby and I only know what my mammy told me about him. He come from across the water when he was a little boy, and was grown when old Master Joseph Vann bought him, so he never did learn to talk much Cherokee. My mammy was a Cherokee slave, and talked it good. My husband was a Cherokee born Negro, too, and when he got mad he forgit all the English he knowed. Old Master Joe had a mighty big farm and several families of Negroes, and he was a powerful rich man. Pappy’s name was Kalet Vann, and mammy’s name was Sally. My brothers was name Sone and Frank. I had one brother and one sister sold when I was little and I don’t remember the names. My other sisters was Polly, Ruth and Liddie. I had to work in the kitchen when I was a...

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Slave Narrative of Chaney Richardson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Chaney Richardson Location: Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Age: 90 I was born in the old Caney settlement southeast of Tahlequah on the banks of Caney Creek. Off to the north we could see the big old ridge of Sugar Mountain when the sun shine on him first thing in the morning when we all getting up. I didn’t know nothing else but some kind of war until I was a grown woman, because when I first can remember my old Master, Charley Rogers, was always on the lookout for somebody or other he was lined up against in the big feud. My master and all the rest of the folks was Cherokees, and they’d been killing each other off in the feud ever since long before I was borned, and jest because old Master have a big farm and three-four families of Negroes them other Cherokees keep on pestering his stuff all the time. Us children was always afeared to go any place less’n some of the grown folks was along. We didn’t know what we was a-feared of, but we heard the Master and Mistress keep talking ’bout “another Party killing” and we stuck close to the place. Old Mistress’ name was Nancy Rogers, but I was a orphan after I was a big...

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Slave Narrative of Betty Robertson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Betty Robertson Location: Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Age: 93 I was born close to Webbers Falls, in the Canadian District of the Cherokee Nation, in the same year that my pappy was blowed up and killed in the big boat accident that killed my old Master. I never did see my daddy excepting when I was a baby and I only know what my mammy told me about him. He come from across the water when he was a little boy, and was grown when old Master Joseph Vann bought him, so he never did learn to talk much Cherokee. My mammy was a Cherokee slave, and talked it good. My husband was a Cherokee born Negro, too, and when he got mad he forgit all the English he knowed. Old Master Joe had a mighty big farm and several families of Negroes, and he was a powerful rich man. Pappy’s name was Kalet Vann, and mammy’s name was Sally. My brothers was name Sone and Frank. I had one brother and one sister sold when I was little and I don’t remember the names. My other sisters was Polly, Ruth and Liddie. I had to work in the kitchen when I was a gal, and they was ten or twelve children smaller than me...

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Slave Narrative of Nancy Rogers Bean

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Nancy Rogers Bean Location: Hulbert, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Boggy Depot, Oklahoma Age: 82 I’m getting old and it’s easy to forget most of the happenings of slave days; anyway I was too little to know much about them, for my mammy told me I was born about six years before the war. My folks was on their way to Fort Gibson, and on the trip I was born at Boggy Depot, down in southern Oklahoma. There was a lot of us children; I got their names somewheres here. Yes, there was George, Sarah, Emma, Stella, Sylvia, Lucinda, Rose, Den, Pamp, Jeff, Austin, Jessie, Isaac and Andrew: we all lived in a one room log cabin on Master Rogers’ place not far from the old military road near Choteau. Mammy was raised around the Cherokee town of Tahlequah. I got my name from the Rogers, but I was loaned around to their relatives most of the time. I helped around the house for Bill McCracken, then I was with Cornelius and Carline Wright, and when I was freed my Mistress was a Mrs. O’Neal, wife of a officer at Fort Gibson. She treated me the best of all and gave me the first doll I ever had. It was a rag doll with charcoal...

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Slave Narrative of Phyllis Petite

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Phyllis Petite Location: Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Rusk County, Texas Age: 83 I was born in Rusk County, Texas, on a plantation about eight miles east of Belleview. There wasn’t no town where I was born, but they had a church. My mammy and pappy belonged to a part Cherokee named W. P. Thompson when I was born. He had kinfolks in the Cherokee Nation, and we all moved up here to a place on Fourteen-Mile Creek close to where Hulbert now is. ‘way before I was big enough to remember anything. Then, so I been told, old master Thompson sell my pappy and mammy and one of my baby brothers and me back to one of his neighbors in Texas name of John Harnage. Mammy’s name was Letitia Thompson and pappy’s was Riley Thompson. My little brother was named Johnson Thompson, but I had another brother sold to a Vann and he always call hisself Harry Vann. His Cherokee master lived on the Arkansas river close to Webber’s Falls and I never did know him until we was both grown. My only sister was Patsy and she was borned after slavery and died at Wagoner, Oklahoma. I can just remember when Master John Harnage took us to Texas. We went in...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. John C. Duncan

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Duncan, Mrs. John C. (See Grant, Duncan and Sanders)—Joanna Coody Rogers daughter of Charles Rogers Coody and Nancy (Patton) Rogers was born in Cooweescoowee District in 1861. Educat­ed in the Cherokee Nation Schools, graduating from the Female Seminary, June 30, 1881. Taught school. In 1885 she mar­ried at Fort Gibson, John Clinton, son of John Thompson and Elizabeth Ann (Sanders) Duncan, born in 1859 in Flint District, Cherokee Nation. He was educated in the Cherokee Public Schools and Male Seminary. Fortunate in having splendid educations, discriminative and appreciative minds, Mr. and Mrs. Duncan have always been...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Ted R. Mounts

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (See Thompson and Gusoduesga) Ada, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Cobb) Brown was born in 1887. Educated in the Cherokee Public Schools and Female Seminary. Married at Fort Gibson in 1911, Ted Ray, son of David Albert and Caroline Harriette (Thompson) Mounts born at Fort Gibson, Saturday March 29,1884. They are the parents of Mary Cherokee, Okla.; Billie Brown, Louise Ramona and Ted Ray Mounts. Mr. and Mrs. Mounts are representative citizens of Fort Gibson and are well known their public spirited...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. William P. Pettit

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (See Grant, Tyner, Adair and Riley)-William Percival, son of William and Nannie (Tyner) Pettitt, was born Sept. 20, 1867; educated at Fort Gibson and the Male Seminary. He married March 18, 1894, Mary Jane, daughter of Benjamin and Sallie (Guerin) Adair, born Thursday, January 1, 1874, in Illinois District. She was educated in the Female Seminary. They moved on April 17, 1894, from Illinois District to Cooweescoowee District, settling three-fourths of a mile north of the Cherokee and Creek line, where they lived until January 19, 1903, when they moved to their present residence at Inola. Mr. and Mrs. Pettitt are the parents of Pearl Olive born Oct. 7, 1895 ; Bertha Talala, born October 27, 1897; Floyd Henry, born March 1, 1900; William Percival, born November 15, 1902; Mazie Opal, born April 15, 1905; Mary Elizabeth, born November 1, 1907, and Elnora Cherokee Pettitt, born October 16,...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. James M. Pierce

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (See Cordery) Nancy Jane, daughter of Albert and Louisa (Cordery) Anderson, was born January 1, 1882; and married August 23, 1896, James Madison Pierce, born December 13, 1877, in Hall County, Georgia. They were the parents of Gertrude: James Clayton and Earl B. Pierce. Mr. Pierce is one of the wealthiest cotton farmers of the Muskogee-Fort Gibson section, owning and operating hundreds of acres of valuable land, and several cotton...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Walter Scott

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (See Grant and Ross) -Nannie Ratliff born December 29, 1856, married Thomas Fox French, and they were the parents of Bernice Martha French who married James Milner Howard; Margaret French who married Charles McDonald, and Nannie French who married Lewis G. Girtley Sleeper. Thomas Fox French died and Mrs. French married Rufus Wyatt McCracken and they were the parents of Walter Scott McCracken. Mr. and Mrs. McCracken were divorced and she married Walter Scott. Mr. and Mrs. Scott are well-to-do farmers near Fort Gibson,...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Berths Rogers

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (See Oolootsa, Ross and Gosaduisga) Lewis Ross, son of Florian Haraden and Fannie (Vann) Nash, was born April 15, 1864, married May 15, 1890 Emma Beck, born January 21, 1871. She died May 5, 1896. They were the parents of Fairy Fawn and Edgar Ross Nash. Mr. Nash married November 24, 1897 Berths McSpadden, born January 16, 1877, and they were the parents of Dorothy Margaret and Clarence E. Nash. Mr. Nash died and Mrs. Nash married Hugh Morgan Rogers, born Sept. 16, 1864. They were the parents of one child and Mr. Rogers is now deceased. Mrs. Rogers is a resident of Fort Gibson,...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. James M. Pierce

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (See Cordery) Nancy Jane, daughter of Albert and Louisa (Cordery) Anderson, was born January 1, 1882; and married August 23, 1896. James Madison Pierce, born December 13, 1877, in Hall County, Georgia. They were the parents of Gertrude, born June 3, 1897; Mark, born November 7, 1898; James Clayton, born February 7, 1902 and Earl B. Pierce, born February 8, 1905. Mr. Pierce is one of the wealthiest cotton farmers of the Muskogee-Fort Gibson section, owning and operating hundreds of acres of valuable land, and several cotton...

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