Location: Ford County KS

Biographies of Ford County Kansas

The following 22 biographies were extracted from the History of the State of Kansas, 1883 and pertain specifically to Ford County. To view the entire history of Ford County, Kansas visit Ford County, Kansas History and Genealogy Ford County is the southwestern most organized county of Kansas, embracing Townships 25, 26, 27, 28 and 29 of Ranges 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 and 26, being thirty miles from north to south and thirty-six miles from east to west, possessing an area of 1,080 square miles. The country is comparatively level, 20 per cent of the land, being bottom-land, which along the Arkansas has an average width of fifteen miles; the upland is 80 per cent, and but a small portion of it is bluffly. Good building stone is found in the county contiguous to Fort Dodge, and near Spearville is found good sand and a good quality of limestone. The county is well watered, the Arkansas River flowing forty miles through the county, and other smaller streams coursing through it in various directions. The most important of these are Mulberry, Five-Mile, Kiowa, Spring and Crooked creeks. Timber is very scanty; what there is, is mostly cottonwood and box elder. These kinds are mostly grown on the timber claims. The county was named for Col. James H. Ford, of the Second Colorado Cavalry. Anthony, A. J. Beamer, P. W. Cox,...

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Biography of Chalkley M. Beeson

The recent death of Buffalo Bill brings to mind how few of the old western plainamen are left. One of the best known to Kansans of that picturesque class of Americans is alive and vigorous at Dodge City, and Chalkley M. Beeson, although he has rubbed shoulders with Generals Custer and Sheridan, Buffalo Bill and the Grand Duke Alexis (sou of a Russian czar), and was, during the earlier period of his manhood, an active flgure in the unrecorded movies of the wild and woolly West, has been settled these many years as a solid, prosperous farmer and state legislator of Ford County. He is a native of Salem, Ohio, born April 24, 1848; went to Denver in April, 1868; came to Kansas from Colorado in 1875, and has made stock raising the serious business of his life ever since. He has represented Ford County in four legislatures–those of 1903, 1905 and 1907, and the special session of 1908. The following sketch is pertinent: “The life of Mr. Beeson bridges the gap between the old and the new of the great plains. Leaving his home in Ohio as a boy of nineteen years, he has lived to see the Wild West supplanted by the Civilised West; as he says, ‘the white-face and short-horn steers replace the buffalo, and wheat, and corn, and alfalfa, supplant the buffalo grass.’ For many...

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Biography of Charles Jeffreys Buckingham

The experiences of Charles J. Buckingham in Kansas cover almost half century. He came to the state in 1868, was for many years successfully identified with the farming, stockraising and public life of Leavenworth and Wabaunsee County, but in 1912 retired and moved to Topeka, where he enjoys the comforts of a city home at 1029 Lane Street. He was born in 1837, in Clermont County, near Miamiville, Ohio. His people were among the earliest and most prominent pioneers of this section of Southern Ohio. His gradfather, Enoch, a native of Pennsylvania, was one of the first white men to effect a permanent settlement in the neighborhood of Cinsinnati. He was born about 1770, and went to the Ohio valley before the lands had been opened to settlement by treaty with the Indian tribes. To locate on the Little Miami River at that time and under such conditions was a very hazardous undertaking. Most of the early pioneers in that section of Ohio put up log houses, but his first habitation was a hollow sycamore log, of immense size, and served the purpose of a human habitation in some respects even better than the typical log cabins of that day. Enoch Buckingham subsequently located near Milford, where during the Civil war Camp Dennison was established. He and a few other daring spirits were the first settlers of the Little...

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Biography of William Edward Davis

William Edward Davis is the youngest state auditor Kansas had ever had and one of the youngest men who ever held such an official dignity in any of the states. It may also be added, to express a general opinion current at the capital and over the state, that Mr. Davis’ administration as suditor had been a synonym of efficiency and economy. He represents that splendid type of young American manhood which had drawn attention by its capacity for accomplishment. Though most of his life had been spent in the Middle West, he was born in West Virginia, and his ancestors had lived there for several generations. He was born on a farm in Hampshire County, July 14, 1875, a son of John William and Hannah Catherine (Timbrook) Davis. His paternal grandfather, Eli Davia, was born in what is now Hardy County, West Virginia, then Old Virginia. He married a Miss Evans. Gipson P. Timbrook, the maternal grandfather, married a Miss Hott. John W. Davis was born in Hardy County, West Virginia, May 26, 1851, while his wife was born in Hampshire County, July 12, 1854. Both parenta are still living, residents of Shawnee County, Kansas, removing there from Carroll County, Missouri, in November, 1915, and they naturally take much pride in the accomplishments of their son. When William E. Davis was nine years old, his parents moved to Carroll...

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Biography of Samuel V. Mallory

Samuel V. Mallory, now superintendent of the city schools of Morrill, Brown County, had been a, Kansas educator for many years. He had been connected at different times with the public schools of three states–Nebraska, Kansas and Oklahoma–and both as a teacher and administrator his work rests upon the seeure foundation of sincere and effective service. Mr. Mallory had lived in Kansas since early youth and he represents some of the best elements of American ancestry. His great-grandfather, John William Mallory, spent his life in Virginia, having been born near Harper’s Ferry. He married Elizabeth peyton, who was the daughter of an officer in the Revolutionary war. Mr. Mallory’s grandfsther was Valentine Roger Mallory, who was born at Harper’s Ferry in Virginia in 1797, and moved from that state to Sangamon County, Illinois, near the capital at Springfield, and was an early farmer in that district. He died at Springfield in 1866. His wife was Nancy Dawson, a native of Kentucky. Several generations of the family were represented in and around Springfield, Illinois, and it was in that city that Samuel V. Mallory was born April 16, 1856. His father is the venerable R. U. Mallory, who was born at Springfield in 1828 and is still living, nearly ninety years of age, at Morrill, Kansas. He grew up and married at Springfield, became a farmer, and in 1871 migrated...

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Biography of Herman Genthe

Herman Genthe. The oldest bakery establishment of Topeka under one continuous ownership and management is that conducted by Mr. Herman Genthe, who now had associated with him his oldest son. Mr. Genthe is a master of his trade. He learned it as a boy in Germany, where his ancestors so far as known were millers and had a great deal to do with those grains that furnish the staple food stuffs, wheat and rye. Mr. Genthe’s talent as a maker of fine bread is therefore partly an inheritance from his ancestors, though it had been developed by his individual experience covering many years. He was born in Saxony, Germany, in 1857, a son of Wilhelm Genthe and a grandson of Gottlieb Genthe. His grandfather was born in 1793 and the family as far as it can be traced lived in Saxony. Wilhelm Genthe died in Saxony in 1890. Reared and educated in his native country, Herman Genthe at the age of twenty-four in 1881 left Germany and made the voyage to America. Landing in Baltimore. he was soon afterward in Waco, Texas, and visited a number of other Texas towns. Later he was in Kansas City, Missouri, then in Chicago, Illinois, and returning to Kansas, began going about among the towns and country communities of the state. and for several years in the early ‘8Os was employed at different...

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Biography of James Wood

James Wood. Among her valued citizens Kansas can number yet many of her pioneers, not the floating population of her earliest territorial days, but men who came to the state as homeseekers, even before the outbreak of the Civil war. These courageous and resourceful men are universally held in honorable esteem for the great progress made by Kansas was founded upon their hardihood and energy. One of these is found in James Wood, a representative citizen and a substantial farmer of Ogden Township, Riley County. James Wood was born in England, September 27, 1844, the eldest son of William and Sarah (Jones) Wood. They came to the United States in 1850, accompanied by their three sons, James, Thomas and William. After living about five years in Greenup County, Kentucky, the family moved to La Salle County, Illinois, thence to Kansas, in the fall of 1857. They settled on the present farm of James Wood, in Ogden Township. Three more sons had been added to the family: Edward and Joseph, both of whom were born in Kentucky, and Charles, who was born in Illinois. The mother of James Wood died in 1862 and the father for his second wife chose Mrs. Elizabeth (Busby) Green, who became the mother of two children: Mary Ann and Ellen Elizabeth. After her death William Wood married a third time but there was no issue...

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Biographical Sketch of William Granville Lee

Lee, William Granville; labor leader; born, La Prairie, Illinois, Nov. 29, 1859; son of James W. and Sylvista Jane (Tracy) Lee; educated, public schools; married, Mary R. Rice, of Chicago, Oct. 15, 1901; brakeman and conductor, A. T. & S. F., Wabash, Missouri P., and U. P. railways, 1879-1884; deputy recorder deeds, Ford County, Kansas, 1884-1888; conductor, U. P. R. R., 1889-1895; 1st vice pres. 1895-1909, pres., Jan. 1, 1909; Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen; Republican;...

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Biography of Elmer Eugene Kelley

E. E. Kelley during his thirty years of residence in Kansas had played a varied and honorable part in affairs, as an educator, farmer, and, in more recent years, as editor and publisher. He is now head of the Toronto Republican and a former president of the Kansas State Editorial Association. Taken in connection with what he had accomplished himself in life, Mr. Kelley may take a reasonable degree of pride in his American ancestry. The Kelley family goes back to Ireland. While the population of America was still straggling along the Atlantic coast in thirteen colonies, James Kelley emigrated from Ireland and settled in Virginia. His ardent sympathies with the cause of the country led him to take part in the Revolutionary war, and he served as an officer of a Virginia regiment. William Kelley, a son of this revolutionary officer, was born at Harper’s Ferry, Virginia, in 1775. He, too, took a part in one of our nation’s wars, and having in the meantime moved from Virginia to Ohio he served in Company A of the First Ohio Militia during the War of 1812. He was with the troops under General Hull at Detroit, when that stronghold was surrendered to the British forces. He afterwards followed farming in Ohio, and moved from that state to Warren County, Indiana, where he died in 1863. William Kelley married Susan...

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Talbott, William Edward – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon William Edward Talbott, 90, of La Grande died Dec. 2 at a local care center. A funeral service is planned for 1 p.m. Friday at Daniels Chapel of the Valley. Burial will follow at the Hillcrest East Cemetery. Viewing will be conducted from 4 to 6 p.m Thursday at Daniels Chapel of the Valley. Mr. Talbott was born Dec. 17, 1915, to Clarence and Hattie Short Talbott in Dodge City, Kan. At an early age his family traveled by touring car to La Grande, where they settled and he attended school. On Sept. 1, 1935, he married Mary Svetich. He worked for the Oregon Highway Department and in the Portland shipyards for a time before moving back to La Grande. He worked as an electrician for Eastern Oregon University for 18 years until his retirement in July 1977. He was a member of Our Lady of the Valley Catholic Church, The Knights of Columbus and the electricians union. Mr. Talbott was a great historian and shared many stories with children in area schools. He enjoyed hunting, fishing, camping and woodworking, and he loved the mountains. Survivors include his wife, Mary of La Grande; siblings, Grace Carpenter of Lewiston, Idaho, and Manson Talbott of Battle Ground, Wash.; and numerous nieces and nephews and other relatives. Dying earlier were a daughter, Virginia Talbott; and siblings, Hershel Talbott, Ernie...

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Dryden, Thomas W. – Obituary

Baker City, Baker County, Oregon Thomas W. Dryden, 95, of Baker City, died Jan. 2, 2003, at St. Elizabeth Health Care Center. At his request, there will be no funeral services. Disposition was by cremation at Gray’s West Pioneer Crematory. Mr. Dryden was born Feb. 16, 1907, in Dodge City, Kan., to Charles W. Dryden and Rose Bell (Arbuckle) Dryden. He was the youngest of three children. When he was quite young, the family moved to Indiana, several years later to Arizona, and on to southern California. He married Doris E. Smith on Sept. 12, 1931, in Yuma, Ariz., and settled in Escondido, Calif., where he had been working for the Matzen Ranches since the mid-1920s, raising avocados and oranges until his retirement in the mid-1970s. Mr. Dryden was a past member of BPOE in Escondido. He was an outdoors person and loved camping and fishing with their friends. He and Doris moved to Baker City in 1997 to be near their daughter and son-in-law. He was loved and very respected by all who were fortunate enough to know him. Survivors include his wife of 71 years, Doris, of Baker City; daughter and son-in-law, Mickie and Skip Bell of Baker City; grandchildren, Sue Tessler and husband, Marc, of Santee, Calif., Tomi Jo Giedeman and her brother, Bob, of San Diego, Calif., Laurie Cantrell of Ruidoso Downs, N.M., Dakin Bell...

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Biography of James B. Jones M. D.

James B. Jones, M. D. For almost a half century Dr. James B. Jones had been in the active practice of his noble profession in Anderson County, Kansas, and while widely known and universally appreciated in other honorable capacities, it is as the skilled and experienced physician and surgeon that his people love him most. Doctor Jones was born October 21, 1847, in Randolph County, Indiana, in one of the picturesque little pioneer cabins that have long since given way in that section to the march of progress, but the memory of which still lingers along with childhood’s recollections. His parents were Llewellyn A. and Lucinda Jane (Parsons) Jones. The father of Doctor Jones was born in 1811 in Rockbridge County, Virginia, coming of Welsh stock, and he died in 1895, at Abilene, Kansas. His business was farming and he was also a minister in the United Brethren faith. In 1830 he was married to Lucinda Jane Parsons, who was a daughter of Robert J. Parsons, a veteran of the Revolutionary war. She was born in Randolph County, Indiana, and died there in 1850. To this marriage nine children were born, seven sons and two daughters, both of the latter dying in infancy. The sons were: William T., David, Lewis, Llewellyn A., all deceased; James B., Henry F., now of Chanute, Kansas, and John M., of Oklahoma. James B....

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Biography of T. J. V. Clark

T.J.V. CLARK. – Mr. Clark, a portrait of whom will be found within these pages, is a man substantial and popular, greatly given to building up the city of his residence, and always inventing ways and means of increasing the quantity and variety of products in the surrounding country. Yakima county owes much to him for the introduction of the new grains and new machinery; and not only has he brought there improved products and methods to the notice of the farmers, but has paid them for their crops, thus giving them substantial encouragement. He is the true merchant, whose place in society is to find a use and exchange for everything is produced or made. His life has been spent in the West, although he was born in Maryland, August 27, 1847, and served in the Union army, enlisting in May, 1862, in the Twenty-third Battery, Indiana Artillery, U.S. Volunteers while but a boy of fourteen. He was discharged on account of wounds on November 26, 1863, at Indianapolis, Indiana. He also attended Rock Hill College, Maryland, after the war, with the intention of studying law, but went west to Kansas and Colorado, serving as scout and guide in the regular army during the Indian wars of 1865 and 1870. During the latter year he married Miss Maggie Mann, one of the pioneer girls of that country, and...

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Biography of Justus Otho Hall

Justus Otho Hall is superintendent of schools at Hutchinson. By his work and influence there and elsewhere he is one of the leading educators of Kansas today. Mr. Hall had been active in school work almost twenty years. Born near Warner, Ohio, February 27, 1870, he came with his parents to Kansas at the age of fifteen. He received his early training in the country schools near Warner, Ohio, and at Morse, Kansas. After spending some time at work on his father’s farm and after three years spent in the United States Railway Mail Service he entered the high school at Lawrence, Kansas, where in five years he completed the high school course and four years of university work. He was graduated from high school in 1896 and in 1898 he received his A. B. degree from the University of Kansas. In the school year of 1898-99 Mr. Hall was assistant principal of the Olathe High School, and was principal of the Horton High School from 1899 to 1901. Since that time he had been superintendent of some of the larger school systems of the state. He was superintendent of the Horton Schools for four years from 1901 to 1905, superintendent at Beloit from 1905 to 1909, and since the fall of 1909 he had been at the head of the Hutchinson City School System, now the fourth in...

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Gaede, Baker & Co.

Gaede, Baker & Co., dealers in a general line of fancy dry goods, clothing and gents furnishing goods and livestock. They opened trade January 1, 1882, and carry a stock of $6,000 and employ one clerk in the business. The individual names of the firm are Richard Gaede, H. C. Baker and S. H. Fields. H. C. Baker first came to Dodge City January 1, 1882. He was born at Logansport, Cass Co., Ind., September 16, 1849. The family moved to Nemaha County, Neb., in 1856, where he was raised in a small village. He first began business in life as a clerk in a store at Brownville, Neb., and has always followed mercantile pursuits. He went to Atchison County, Mo., in 1874, and clerked in a dry goods store for some time, when he purchased a third interest in the same and continued for three years. He then became a member of the firm of Gaede, Baker & Co., until he came to Dodge City. He was married in May 1877, to Miss Bertha Renner, of Rockport, Mo. They have two children – Nellie and...

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