Location: Fond du Lac County WI

Biographical Sketch of Fred D. Cleaves

FRED D. CLEAVES. – Although among the young men, Mr. Cleaves has for a number of years held responsible public positions. He was born in Stockbridge, Wisconsin, in 1852, residing in that village and at Fond du Lac until ten years of age, and coming in 1864 to this coast with his father’s family. Here is one of the few cases in which we find one of the early settlers returning to the East. After a year’s residence at Whidby Island, and two years at Albany, Oregon, the elder Cleaves recrossed the plains to his old home in Wisconsin. The change gave young Fred a better opportunity for education; but upon reaching man’s estate he still remembered the Pacific coast, and gradually drifted hither. Two years he stopped in Colorado. Finally coming up to Puget Sound, he began professional work, as teacher of penmanship at White River, and in 1880 made his home at La Conner, teaching there a few years. He found more agreeable employment, however, as clerk in the store of B.L. Martin, and afterwards for L.L. Andrews. While in the latter position, he was elected on the Democratic ticket as county treasurer of Skagit county one year, and re-elected in1884. He was also appointed clerk of the district court by Judge Greene, and was continued in this position by Judges Jones, Boyle, Burke and Hanford. He...

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Biographical Sketch of L. L. Silverthorn, M. D.

L. L. Silverthorn, M. D., physician and surgeon, Charleston; was born in Stroudsburg, Monroe, Co., Penn., Oct. 21, 1830; his early life was passed upon a farm; he was the youngest of a family of twelve children, and his father being in moderate circumstances, he was thrown upon his own resources, and obtained only such an education as the common schools afforded; in 1850, he began teaching school, which he continued at intervals for three years; in 1852, he entered upon the study of medicine, in Fond du Lac, Wis.; in 1854, he came to Charleston and continued his studies under the instruction of Dr. T. B. Trower; in September, 1855, be went to Philadelphia, and attended a course of lectures in the Jefferson Medical College, in that city; returning to Charleston, he began the practice of his profession, which he has continued for twenty-two years; he is a member of the ̠sculapian, Society of the Wabash Valley, of which he has been Vice President, and also of the American Medical Association. He was married October 8, 1856, to Miss Amerial Trower, a daughter of the late Dr. T. B. Trower, of Charleston, and has two children РJohn T. and Clara...

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Biographical Sketch of Tusten, H. W.

Tusten, H. W. farmer, P. O. Russell, came here with the Northwestern Colony, in the spring of 1871. He opened the first general store and continued merchandising for six years. At the same time he opened a farm of 320 acres, and now has 200 acres of it under cultivation. He makes a specialty in the stock business, dealing largely in cattle and horses. He keeps the Membrino stock of horses. He was born in Ontario County, N. Y., in 1833, lived in his native State until 1841, and then came with his parents to Kenosha, Wis., where they lived about seven years. Thence went to Green Lake County, where they farmed for some time. He then went to Minnesota and followed various occupations for six years. He then engaged in lumbering at Fond du Lac, Wis., for four years, and in merchandising for three years. Thence he came to Kansas. He was married in 1867 to Miss Matilda de Neveu, a native of the latter city. They have four children – Herman W., Hattie D., Arthur E. and Emma. He is president of the town site, member of the City Council,...

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Biographical Sketch of Chadbourne, J. S.

Chadbourne, J. S. Clerk of the District Court, first came here in 1872. He engaged in farming a few years, and was telegraph operator for three years. Was elected to his present position in the fall of 1878, and has since held the office by re-election. Is now Deputy County Clerk, and Deputy County Superintendent of Schools. He was born in Harrison, Me., in 1843; lived in his native State until 1856, when he went to Ripon, Wis., and after a number of years learned telegraphy, and became operator there for two years. He then engaged in lumbering until he came to Kansas. He was married, in 1880, to Miss Ella A. Bowen, of Russell, Kan. They have one son – Willie S. Mr. Chadbourne is a member of Russell Lodge, No. 177, A., F. & A. M.; is also a member of the Congregational...

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Biographical Sketch of Banker,Louis

Banker, Louis first came to Russell in 1876 and took charge of a general store for G. A. Hart, five years. He then became a partner in Giddings, Banker & Co. Giddings, Banker & Co., dealers in general merchandise. They opened trade September 14, 1881, and carry a stock of about $8,000, in a general line of merchandise. The firm is composed of Louis Banker, R. S. Giddings and M. A. Blaine, of Middleburg, Mass. Born in Belleville, Canada West, in 1858, went to Rosendale and Waupun, Wis., in 1864, with parents and to Cass County, Iowa in 1871, then to...

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Biography of Mann, Stillman

Mann, Stillman proprietor of the Russell House. Mr. Mann erected the stone part of his hotel in the summer of 1877; it is 25×48 feet, and three stories high. There is also a wooden addition, 26×68 feet. The hotel cost $7,000. Capacity is about seventy-five guests. He first came to Russell in April 1871, with the Northwestern Colony from Eastern Wisconsin; at that time there was only a section house in the place. He, in company with H. W. Tusten, built a small shanty, and both families lived in that until other arrangements could be made. Mrs. Mann first began to bake bread and sell it to settlers, and finally, after they got more room, they began to lodge people, and that is the way the Russell House first started. The Northwestern Colony were citizens of Ripon, Oshkosh and Fond du Lac, Wis. The biographies of the most active men in this colony will appear in the history of Russell County. Dr. C. W. Bond came with the colony, but remained only a short time and returned to Wisconsin. The only meat the settlers had for over two years was buffalo, deer, antelope and elk, which roamed over the plains in vast herds, and could be shot down in any direction. Mr. Mann was born in Orange County, Vt., in 1825, where he lived until he was twenty-one years...

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Biographical Sketch of Parker, F. L.

Parker, F. L. dealer in grain, lumber and coal. Mr. W. C. Hobbs opened the business in 1871. The firm was changed to Hobbs & Parker in 1879. They carry a stock of about $10,000 in lumber, building material, etc. Mr. Parker came to Russell in the fall of 1877, and became interested in the above business. He was born in Ann Arbor, Mich., July 27, 1848. Moved to Fond du Lac, Wis., with his parents in 1851, where they resided until the fall of 1855, when they moved to Oshkosh, Wis. At a suitable age he engaged in the hardware business, in which he remained about five years. He then embarked in the manufacture of handles, also the woodwork of carriages and wagons, until he came to Kansas. He was married on March 28, 1871, to Miss Lizzie V. Hobbs. They have two children – William H. and Frederick L. Mr. Parker is a member of Pioneer Lodge, No. 43, A. O. U. W., of Russell. Has been a member of the City Council,...

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Biographical Sketch of Ackerman, Theodore

Ackerman, Theodore president of Russell Bank. This bank was opened for business July 10, 1877. The bank building was erected in 1878, at a cost of $3,700 It is built of stone, 22×40 feet, two stories high. Charles P. Copeland is cashier. E. Copeland, of Middletown Springs, Vt., is interested in the same. The bank correspondents are: United States National Bank of New York City, First National Bank of Chicago, Ill.; Bank of Kansas City, Mo.; and First National Bank of Leavenworth, Kan The deposits equal $40,000 to $90,000. Mr. Ackerman first came to Russell, Kan., in 1871, with the Northwestern Colony. He then embarked in merchandising until 1878. He was born in Rodendale, Wis., in 1849. He began life as a clerk for his father, Henry I. Ackerman, in general merchandise, which he continued until coming to Kansas. Was married, in 1877, to Miss Libbie Holly, a native of New York State. They have one daughter Myrtle Jessie. He was the first County Clerk of Russell County; was also secretary of the Northwestern Colony, and is now president of it. He has held several town offices,...

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Biographical Sketch of Bradshaw, George T.

Bradshaw, George T. dealer in grain, coal, flour, feed, paints, etc., opened business in 1876. The firm of Knight, Bradshaw & Potter are proprietors of Fairport Flouring Mills, which are located at Fairport, fifteen miles northwest of Russell. These mills are 38×40 feet, three stories high, built of stone in 1879, at a cost of $12,000. The mills are propelled by both steam and water. The capacity is sixty barrels in twenty-four hours. Mr. Bradshaw first came to Russell in April, 1871, with the Northwestern Colony. He was born in Schenectady County, N. Y., in 1836, and reared on a farm. He moved to Waupun, Wis., in January, 1867, where he was principal of South Ward School two years. He then clerked for a grain firm two years. He graduated in the Jonesville Seminary, Saratoga, N.Y. He was a member of freshmen, sophomore and junior classes of Union College, Schenectady, N. Y. He was married in 1863 to Miss D. O. Weld, of Wells, Hamilton Co., N. Y. They have two children, Marion and Charles W. He is a member of A. O. U. W., Pioneer Lodge, No....

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