Location: Floyd County IN

Hutchinson Family of Norwich Vermont

Hutchinson is an old and numerous family in Norwich, as well as in other parts of the country. They were among the early settlers of Massachusetts and were in Lynn and Salem in that colony as early as 1628, or 1629. A descendant of these early colonists, named Abijah, who was a tailor, removed from Salem to Windham early in the eighteenth century. His son Samuel, born about 1719, in company with his son, John, came to Norwich in 1765. They cleared an island in the Connecticut River, opposite the present residency of John W. Loveland, and planted it with corn. In the fall of that year they returned to Connecticut, and in company with a younger son, Samuel, returned in the spring of 1766, and made a permanent settlement. The elder Samuel spent the remainder of his life in the town, and died February 8, 1809. His wife was Jemina Dunham; she died January 12, 1798. Besides the two sons named above, he had three daughters: Sarah, married Francis Smalley; Tabitha, married Jonathan Delano; Jerusha, married Nathan Roberts. They all died young,’ soon after marriage. Hutchinson, John, son of Samuel, was born in 1741, in Windham, Connecticut, and married Mary Wilson, who was born in Ashford, Connecticut, in August, 1744. He enlisted in the Continental Army, and died at Philadelphia, June 22, 1778. His widow afterwards married Solomon...

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Slave Narrative of Alex Woodson

Interviewer: Iris Cook Person Interviewed: Alex Woodson Location: New Albany, Indiana Place of Birth: Woodsonville, Hart County, Kentucky, Age: 80-85 Place of ResidenceL 905 E. 4th St., New Albany, Indiana Iris Cook Dist 4 Floyd Co. SLAVE STORY THE STORY OF ALEX WOODSON 905 E. 4th St. New Albany, Ind. Observation of Writer Alex Woodson is an old light skinned darkey, he looks to be between 80 and 85, it is hard to tell his age, and colored folks hardly ever do know their correct age. I visited him in his little cottage and had a long talk with him and his wife (his second). “Planted the fust one.” They run a little grocery in the front room of the cottage. But the stock was sadly run down. Together with the little store and his “pinshun” (old age pension) these old folks manage to get along. Alex Woodson was born at Woodsonville, in Hart County, Kentucky, just across Green River from Munfordville. He was a good sized boy, possibly 7 years or more when “Freedom wuz declared”. His master was “Old Marse” Sterrett who had about a 200 acre place and whose son in law Tom Williams ran a store on this place. When Williams married Sterretts daughter he was given Uncle Alex and his mother and brother as a present. Williams was then known as “Young Master.” When...

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Slave Narrative of George Taylor Burns

Interviewer: Lauana Creel Person Interviewed: George Taylor Burns Location: Evansville, Indiana Ex-Slave Stories District #5 Vanderburgh County Lauana Creel THE LIFE STORY OF GEORGE TAYLOR BURNS [HW: Personal Interview] Ox-carts and flat boats, and pioneer surroundings; crowds of men and women crowding to the rails of river steamboats; gay ladies in holiday attire and gentleman in tall hats, low cut vests and silk mufflers; for the excursion boats carried the gentry of every area. A little negro boy clung to the ragged skirts of a slave mother, both were engrossed in watching the great wheels that ploughed the Mississippi river into foaming billows. Many boats stopped at Gregery’s Landing, Missouri to stow away wood, for many engines were fired with wood in the early days. The Burns brothers operated a wood yard at the Landing and the work of cutting, hewing and piling wood for the commerce was performed by slaves of the Burns plantation. George Taylor Burns was five years of age and helped his mother all day as she toiled in the wood yards. “The colder the weather, the more hard work we had to do,” declares Uncle George. George Taylor Burns, the child of Missouri slave parents, recalls the scenes enacted at the Burns’ wood yards so long ago. He is a resident of Evansville, Indiana and his snow white hair and beard bear testimony that...

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Slave Narrative of Nancy Whallen

Interviewer: Iris L. Cook Person Interviewed: Nancy Whallen Location: New Albany, Indiana Age: 81 Place of Residence: 924 Pearl St., New Albany, Indiana Iris L Cook District #4 Floyd County SLAVE STORY STORY OF NANCY WHALLEN 924 Pearl St. New Albany, Ind. Nancy Whallen is now about 81 years of age. She doesn’t know exactly. She was about 5 year of age when Freedom was declared. Nancy was born and raised in Hart County near Hardinsburg, Kentucky. She is very hard to talk to as her memory is failing and she can not hear very well. The little negro girl lived the usual life of a rural negro in Civil War Time and afterwards. She remembers the “sojers” coming thru the place and asking for food. Some of them camped on the farm and talked to her and teased her. She tells about one big nigger called “Scott” on the place who could outwork all the others. He would hang his hat and shirt on a tree limb and work all day long in the blazing sun on the hottest day. The colored folk, used to have revivals, out in the woods. They would sometimes build a sort of brush shelter with leaves for a roof and service a would be held here. Preachin’ and shouting’ sometimes lasted all day Sundays. Colored folks came from miles around when they...

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Slave Narrative of George Morrison

Interviewer: Iris Cook Person Interviewed: George Morrison Location: New Albany, Indiana Place of Residence: 25 East 5t., New Albany, Indiana Place of Birth: Union County, Kentucky Iris Cook District 4 Floyd County STORY OF GEORGE MORRISON 25 East 5th St., New Albany, Ind. Observation of the writer (This old negro, known as “Uncle George” by the neighbors, is very particular about propriety. He allows no woman in his house unless accompanied by a man. He says “It jest a’nt the proper thing to do”, but he came to a neighbors for a little talk.) “I was bawn in Union County, Kentucky, near Morganfield. My master was Mr. Ray, he made me call him Mr. Ray, wouldent let me call him Master. He said I was his little free negro.” When asked if there were many slaves on Mr. Ray’s farm, he said, “Yes’m, they was seven cabin of us. I was the oldes’ child in our family. Mr. Ray said “He didn’t want me in the tobacco”, so I stayed at the house and waited on the women folk and went after the cows when I was big enough. I carried my stick over my shoulder for I wus afraid of snakes.” “Mr. Ray was always very good to me, he liked to play with me, cause I was so full of tricks an’ so mischuvus. He give me...

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Biography of C. F. Lutes

C. F. Lutes. The largest hand glass plant west of the Mississippi River is that of the Fredonia Window Glass Company, located at Fredonia, Kansas. The president and general manager of this enterprise, C. F. Lutes, had been connected with the glass industry ever since entering upon his career, and is a man of experience, resource and energy, who, since coming to Kansas in 1904, had occupied a position of importance among the business men of Fredonia. The success of the company with which he is identified, and its allied interests at Caney, Kansas and Okmulgee, Oklahoma, must be accredited to his efforts and good management. Like numerous other men who have reached successful places in business affairs of Kansas, Mr. Lutes is a native of Indiana. He was born at New Albany, the county seat of Floyd County, on the Ohio River, January 1, 1871, and is a son of F. W. Lutes and a member of a family that was founded in America by a German emigrant to New York during ante-Revolutionary days. Daniel Lutes was born in 1803, in Connecticut, and as a young man learned the trade of glass-blowing, which he followed throughout his career. During the latter part of his life he resided at Mount Clemens, Michigan, and there his death occurred in 1873, when he was seventy years of age. He had been...

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Biographical Sketch of H. C. Watson

H. C. Watson, time-keeper and clerk M. M. L & St. L. shops, Mattoon; was born in New Madrid, New Madrid Co., Mo., July 27, 1827; his father was a Scotchman and was one of the early Western pioneers, having come West as early as 1805. Having obtained a good common school education, in 1844, he became a student in Prof. J. B. Anderson’s high school, in New Albany, Ind.; this he attended one year; in 1845, he attended St. Vincent’s College at Cape Girardeau; in 1848, he matriculated in Bethany College, Va., and remained one year; on his return home, he engaged in merchandising, and followed the business till 1863; by reason of the war, he lost most of his stock and trade; he moved with his family to Litchfield, Ill., and, in 1865, entered the office of the Master Mechanic of the St. L., A. & T. H. R. R., as clerk and timekeeper; in 1867, the I. & St. L. leased the road, and, in 1870, when the shops were removed from Litchfield to Mattoon, he came with them. He was married in November, 1852, to Sarah C. Post, a native of Alton, Ill.; has five children – William G., Harry W., Frank E., Jennie, Gertie. Has held the office of School Director, East...

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Biographical Sketch of George W. Baker

George W. Baker, farmer; P. O. Charleston; the subject of this sketch was born in Philadelphia, Penn., May 30, 1824. He married Miss Susan Bell Aug. 26, 1846; she was born in Floyd Co., Ind., March 12, 1830, and died March 9, 1863; they had six children, three living, viz., George B., Win. A. and John V.; his present wife was Mrs. Shaw, formerly Miss Jane Hancock; they were married Oct. 19, 1863; she was born in Floyd Co., Ind., Jan. 17, 1830; she had by former marriage five children, two living, viz., Flora J. Shaw and Sarah E. Shaw. He lived in Philadelphia about fourteen years, when, with his parents, he moved to Floyd Co., Ind., where his father engaged at his trade of shoemaking; he lived there until 1859, when he went to Spencer Co., Ind., and engaged in farming, remaining six years; he then returned to Floyd Co., and, after remaining two years, he came to Illinois and settled on his present place, and has lived here since; he owns 308 acres in this county, which he has earned by his own labor and management. His parents, Stephen and Mary Edwards Baker, were natives of Philadelphia and Maryland; they were married in Philadelphia; in 1837, they moved to Indiana and settled in Flood Co. where they...

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Biographical Sketch of Jacob K. Cottonham

Jacob K. Cottonham, farmer; P. O. Charleston; the subject of this sketch was born in Floyd Co., Ind., Nov. 15, 1831. He married Miss Sallie Ann Fowler March 5, 1855; she was born in Coles Co., Ill., Dec. 13, 1843 they had seven children, six living viz., William E., Margaret L., George A., Joseph U., Charles D. W. and Hervey F. He lived in Indiana until 1855, when he came to Illinois, and settled in Coles Co. near Charleston, and engaged in brickmaking, and continued in the business nearly eight years, when he engaged in farming; in 1874, he came to his present place, and has lived here since; he owns 120 acres here and 49 in Charleston Tp., which he has principally earned by his own labor. His parents, Andrew and Margaret Grant Cottonham, were natives of Kentucky and Virginia; they were married in Indiana; they came to Coles Co. in 1855; he died Aug. 29, 1869; she is living herewith her son. His wife’s parents were James and Susan Ann Lumbrick Fowler; were natives of Tennessee and Coles Co., Ill. (probably), they being in this county at a very early date; they died in 1843 and 1848,...

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Biography of A. N. Bain

A. N. Bain, proprietor of the Charleston Foundry, Charleston; was born in Erie Co., Ohio, April 3, 1828; his father was a ship-carpenter, with a family of nine children; at the age of 14, Mr. Bain began working on a farm, which he continued until the spring of 1845, when he entered the Mad River & Lake Erie Railroad shop at Sandusky, Ohio, as an apprentice, remaining there until 1852, and thoroughly mastering the machinist’s trade. He then went to New Albany, Ind., where he was married, Feb. 3, 1853, to Miss Catharine Caldwell, of that city, who was born in Appomattox Co., Va., Feb. 8, 1832. While in New Albany, he worked as a mechanic in the shops of the New Albany & Salem Railroad; in April, 1853, he removed to Terre Haute, Ind., and entered the foundry of Grover & Madison, and remained in their employ until April 1, 1857; he then came to Charleston, and, with his brother, William Bain, and George 0. Carr, erected a small building, 25×50 feet in size; Mr. Carr soon retired from the firm; they ran a general repair foundry till 1863, when they made their first stove, and enlarged their buildings, which now cover four town lots, while their trade extends from Indianapolis on the east, to the Rocky Mountains on the west; in 1869, Mr. Bain engaged in the...

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