Location: Fitzwilliam New Hampshire

Industry of Fitzwilliam NH

Fitzwilliam Savings bank, located in the Postoffice block, at Fitzwilliam village, was incorporated in 1871, and commenced business in 1872, with Philip S. Batchellor, president, and Milton Chaplin, treasurer. The present officers are Amos J. Blake, president, and Stephen Batchellor, treasurer. George D. Webb Granite Co.’s quarry and shops are located at the crossing of the railroad and road 31. The firm consists of George D. Webb and C. F. Batchelder, of Worcester, Mass., who began work here in July, 1882. They have extensive sheds, a polishing-mill, blacksmiths shops and enginehouse, using three engines and two steam drills. Their works are also accommodated with side-tracks to the Cheshire railroad, and they give employment to about seventy-five men in the summer and twenty-five in the winter season, producing all kinds of rough and finished granite. In 1884 they did a business aggregating $85,000.00, using 600 cars for transporting their goods. Alonzo Whipple is superintendent of the works, and Elliot K. Wheelock, cashier. Fisher & Newton’s granite quarry, located off road 15, was opened by John E Fisher about 1880, and Charles Newton became a partner in 1882. They employ about eight men in quarrying and cutting cemetery monumental work and curbing, doing a business of about $8,000.00 per year. Mr. Fisher opened the present Webb quarry in 1867, Dwelly quarry in 1894, and the above in 1880. D. H. Reed’s...

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Early Settlers of Fitzwilliam NH

The name of the grantees of 1765 were as follows: Sampson Stoddard, Nathaniel Treadwell, Thomas Spaulding, Benjamin Edwards, Jacob Treadwell, Jr., Matthew Thornton, Nathaniel Brooks, David Millen, Jonathan Lovewell, John Honey, John Stevens, John Woods, William Earl Treadwell Paul March, Charles Treadwell, Edmund Grouard, Jonathan Blanchard, Sampson Stoddard, Jr., Abel Lawrence, James Reed, Benjamin Bellows, George Libbey, Jonathan Willson and Jeremiah Libbey. The first meeting of the grantees of which a record exists, after the lots had been drawn, was held at the house of Thomas Harwood, in Dunstable, Monday, May 20, 1765, when Sampson Stoddard, Esq., was chosen moderator, and Sampson Stoddard, Jr., clerk. The third item considered is recorded as follows. ” Then the following method for calling meetings for the future was agreed upon, & voted that upon application of the Owners of Ten Original Shares made in Writing to the Clerk (for the time being) Inserting therein the several matters and things Desired to be acted upon, he shall and is hereby authorized and Impowered to call such meeting or meetings, Posting up Proper Notifications. at some place in Dunstable in New Hampshire, and at some public place in Chelmsford at Least fourteen Days Before hand & all meetings as so posted up & held accordingly shall be Good & Valid.” The next meeting was held at the house of Capt. Oliver Barron, in Chelmsford,...

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Biographical Sketch of John Shirley

John Shirley, a soldier of the Revolution, was born on board ship coming from England, and was brought up in Boston. He came to Fitzwilliam about 1780, settling in the village, and married Submit Bogle, of Sudbury, Mass. He reared a family of nine children, and died at the age of ninety-three, in the house where his grandson, William H., now lives. His son, Henry, was born in the town, held the office of selectman several years, and died at the same place his father did, at the age of seventy-two. William H., son of Henry, was born in the house where he now lives, on road 46, and is first selectman of the...

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General History of Fitzwilliam NH

FITZWILLIAM, one of the southern tier of townships in the county, lies in lat. 42° 45 and long. 4° 54′, bounded north by Troy and Jaffrey, east by Jaffrey and Rindge, south by the state line, and west by Richmond. The town was originally granted by the Masonion proprietors, as Monadnock No. 4, January 15, 1752, to Roland Cotton and forty-one others. These grantees, however, failed to comply with the requirements of the charter and thus forfeited their right to the territory, and it was subsequently, early in 1765, rE.granted to Samson Stoddard and twenty-three associates. On May 19, 1773, upon petition of the inhabitants, a New Hampshire charter was obtained of Governor Wentworth, and the town was incorporated under its present name, given in honor of the Earl of Fitzwilliam. In the charter deed, which contained the usual restrictions and reservations of those documents, the township was bounded as follows: “Beginning at the west line of Mason’s patent, by the north line of Massachusetts six miles; east by South Monadnock [now Rindge] five miles; thence north 80′ west one and one quarter miles to the southwest corner of Middle Monadnock; thence north by the needle two miles and forty rods; thence :north 8g° west to the patent west line as lately marked; and from thence south by that line to the place of beginning.” These bounds enclosed an...

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Fitzwilliam Village Cheshire County NH

FITZWILLIAM is a pleasant post village located in the northern-central part of the town, on six main roads. Besides the usual mechanic shops, and stores, it has a savings bank, three church organizations, town hall, two hotels, and several granite shops and...

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Biographical Sketch of Ezra Hayden

Ezra Hayden, a native of Sudbury, Mass., came here about 1804 or 1805. locating upon the farm where Ethan Blodgett now lives. He removed to the place now owned by Eli Smith, where he died in 1843, at the age of fiftyeight years. His son, Otis, was born here where he has lived most of his life. His residence is on road...

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Biographical Sketch of Silas Fife

Silas Fife came to Troy from Bolton. Mass., and settled in the eastern part of the town. He was a farmer, had a family of ten children, and died there in 1834. His son, Timothy, a native of Troy, remained there until his death, December 12, 1872, in his eightieth year. Daniel J., son of Timothy, also a native of Troy, came to Fitzwilliam in 1877, and located on road 49...

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Biographical Sketch of Josiah Carter

Josiah Carter came from Lancaster, Mass., in 1803, being at that time sixteen years of age. His father, Joseph, was a shoemaker and he was brought up to the trade, which he carried on until 1818. He then bought a farm and devoted his after life to that. He was a lieutenant in the artillery. He married Betsey E. Foster and reared a family of four children, all now living. His sons, Josiah E., and Charles C., have always resided here and for fortynine years have carried on the carriage business together. Charles C. married Sarah C. Tyler, of Chesterfield, and has two sons and two daughters. He has been town treasurer and held other offices of trust. Josiah E. has twice married, first, to Isabinda Ingalls, acid second, Sarah A. Fay, and has one son, Albert E., of Winchendon, Mass. Josiah E. was town representative in 1861 and 1862, and has been town treasurer several...

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Biographical Sketch of Barzaliel Baker

Barzaliel Baker came to Marlboro from Westminster, Mass., about 1800. He was a farmer and settled upon the farm now occupied by Howard Clark, where he died, at the age of eighty-two. His son Asa was born in Marlboro, where lived until 1833, when he moved, to Jaffrey, where he remained until his death, in October, 1869, at the age of sixty-six years. Edwin C., a native of Jaffrey, came to this town in...

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Biographical Sketch of Hezekiah Stone

Hezekiah Stone came from Massachusetts about 1780, and bought the land where Benjamin Whitcomb now lives. He was a farmer, owned a saw-mill, and had two sons and three daughters. The eldest, Artemas, had a son, Artemas, who was the father of Stillman S. Stone. Moses, second son of Hezekiah, was born in Fitzwilliam, December 31. 1785. He was also a farmer, and operated a saw-mill. He was one who responded to the call for troops in 1812, and went to Portsmouth, but not into active service. He died in January,...

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The First Baptist Church, Fitzwilliam, NH

The First Baptist church, located at Fitzwilliam, was organized in 1815, with six or eight members, by Rev. Nathaniel Bowes, of Richmond, Rev. Arnot Allen being the first pastor. The church building, erected in 1842, will seat 250 persons, cost $1,800.00, and is valued, including grounds, etc., at $5,000.00. The society now has sixty-two members, and a Sabbath-school with ninety scholars, with Rev. Andrew Dunn,...

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