Location: Fayetteville Arkansas

The Cherokee Revolt – Indian Wars

From the removal of the Cherokee Indians from Georgia and Tennessee to Arkansas and their establishment upon the reservation allotted to them by treaty with the Government in Arkansas, they have, until the period of this outbreak to the narrative of which this chapter is devoted, been considered as among the least dangerous and most peaceable of the tribes in that region. But through various causes, chief among which has been notably the introduction among them of a horde of those pests of the West the border ruffians; these half wild, half-breed Nomads were encouraged by these Indians, as it appeared, for the sake of the liquor traffic. According to the official accounts of this attempt to reopen hostilities, it appears that on the 11th of April, 1872, it originated with a man named J. J. Kesterson, living in the Cherokee nation, near the Arkansas line, about fifty miles from Little Rock. On that day he went to Little Rock, and filed information against one Proctor, also a white man, married to a Cherokee woman, for assaulting with intent to kill him while in his saw mill, on the 13th of February. Proctor fired a revolver at Kesterson, the ball striking him just above the left eye, but before he could fire again Kesterson escaped. Proctor, at the time, was under indictment in the Snake District for the murder of his...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Aunt Adeline

“I was born a slave about 1848, in Hickmon County, Tennessee,” said Aunt Adeline who lives as care taker in a house at 101 Rock Street, Fayetteville, Arkansas, which is owned by the Blakely-Hudgens estate. Aunt Adeline has been a slave and a servant in five generations of the Parks family. Her mother, Liza, with a group of five Negroes, was sold into slavery to John P.A. Parks, in Tennessee, about 1840. “When my mother’s master come to Arkansas about 1849, looking for a country residence, he bought what was known as the old Kidd place on the Old Wire Road, which was one of the Stage Coach stops. I was about one year old when we came. We had a big house and many times passengers would stay several days and wait for the next stage to come by. It was then that I earned my first money. I must have been about six or seven years old. One of Mr. Parks’ daughters was about one and a half years older than I was. We had a play house back of the fireplace chimney. We didn’t have many toys; maybe a doll made of a corn cob, with a dress made from scraps and a head made from a roll of scraps. We were playing church. Miss Fannie was the preacher and I was the audience. We were...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Herbert W. Hicks

(See Foreman)-Abijah Hicks, born March 2, 1819, married Jan. 30, 1852, Hannah Worcester, born January 29, 1834 in New Echota, Georgia. He died June 4, 1862. Mrs. Hannah Hicks died Feb. 3, 1917. They were the parents of Percy W., Emma L, Edith H., Clara A. and Herbert Worcester Hicks. Percy W. married Elms Garrett and lives at Fort Gibson. Edith married Charles W. Smith and Richard 111. Walker. Clara A. married Nicholas McNair Thornton and George I. Hopson. Herbert Worcester Hicks was born at Park Hill May 18, 1861; and married at Fayetteville, Arkansas, on December 23, 1886, Rachel, the daughter of James and Sarah Cardwell, who was born July 20, 1869, in Washington County, Arkansas. They are the parents of Ethel Inez, born December 24, 1889; Homer Wilton, born October 22, 1891; Clifton A., born November 16, 1894; Vera Clare, born Oct. 14, 1896 died Nov. 28, 1900; Ralph Connor, born March 30, 1903, and Herbert Morris, born June 3, 1907. Ethel Inez married A. M. Buster, and Homer Wilton married Ferrel Thompson. Mr. Hicks Cherokee name is E-no-li. His mother was a daughter of Reverend Samuel A. Worcester, one of the first Missionaries to the Cherokees, coming with them from Tennessee and Georgia, in 1838; his father was a descendant of Charles Hicks, a Cherokee Chief in the old Cherokee...

Read More

Slave Narrative of R. C. Smith

Person Interviewed: R. C. Smith Occupation: Prophet One morning in May I heard a poor rebel say; “The federal’s a home guard Dat called me from home…” I wish I was a merchant And could write a fine hand, I’d write my love a letter So she would understand. I wish I had a drink of brandy, And a drink of wine, To drink wid dat sweet gal How I wish dat she was mine. If I had a drink of brandy No longer would I roam, I’d drink it wid dat gal of mine Dat wishes me back home. I’ve heard the soldiers sing that song a heap of times. They sung it kind of lonesome like and I guess it sort of made them home sick to sing it. Us niggers learned to sing it and it is about the only one I can sing yet. I remembers the words to another one we used to sing but I’ve forgot the tune but the words go like this: Old man, old man Your hair is getting gray, I’d foller you ten thousand miles To hear your banjo play. I never was much at singing though. I guess my voice is just about wore out just like my body. I’ve always had good health and I never had a doctor in my life. In the last three or...

Read More

Biography of Allan Arthur Gilbert, M.D.

Dr. Allan Arthur Gilbert, an internist of St. Louis, who in his practice has gained high professional standing, was born in Burrton, Kansas, May 26, 1890, a son of the Rev. H. M. Gilbert, who was born in South Carolina, but was descended from one of the old families of Connecticut of English lineage. The progenitor of the family in the new world was Mathew Gilbert, who came across the Atlantic on the historic Mayflower and was the first deputy governor of Connecticut under King George. Among the ancestors of Dr. Gilbert was also Colonel Ethan Allen, who commanded the famous Green Mountain boys in the Revolutionary war. Rev. H. M. Gilbert was a graduate of Vanderbilt University, attending the Theological Seminary and also was gradauted from Wafford College. He received his Doctor of Divinity degree from Vanderbilt and devoted his entire life to the ministry of the Presbyterian church. He is now a representative of the Presbyterian Board of Ministerial Relief and resides in St. Louis, but has his business headquarters in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He married Clara Elizabeth Fulton, a native of Illinois. Her father was Isaac B. Fulton, a pioneer of that state and also of Kansas and after removing to the west be served as a member of the state legislature of Kansas for a number of terms and was very active in republican politics. He...

Read More

Biography of Frank Pace

FRANK PACE is one of the youngest, but none the less one of the ablest, attorneys of northwest Arkansas. He has improved every opportunity for gaining knowledge and has availed himself of every chance for the betterment of his condition and reputation, and more than this cannot be said of the most successful man who has ever lived. He owes his nativity to Boone County, Arkansas, born here, he first saw the light July 25, 1871, being a son of the well-known attorney, Capt. W. F. Pace. Frank Pace, after receiving his initiatory training in the public schools of his native county, finished his education in the State University at Fayetteville, Arkansas, which institution he left at the age of sixteen, while in his junior year, and at once took up the study of law with his father, in Harrison, and on the day he was nineteen years old he was admitted to the bar. He at once began practicing in Harrison, but after a short time located in Yellville, where he has since been located and where he has built up an exceptionally large practice, in fact one of the largest in that section of the State. He is also the leading attorney of the county, is keen, shrewd and quick-witted, and presents his cases with masterly skill before judge and jury. He is a candidate for prosecuting...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Miss Adeline Blakeley

Interviewer: Mary D. Hudgins Person Interviewed: Miss Adeline Blakely Age: 87 Home: 101 Rock Street, Fayetteville, Arkansas “Honey, look in the bible to get the date when I was born. We want to have it just right. Yes, here’s the place, read it to me. July 10, 1850? Yes, I remember now, that’s what they’ve always told me. I wanted to be sure, though. I was born in Hickman County, Tenn. and was about a year when they brought me to Arkansas. My mother and her people had been bought by Mr. John P. Parks when they were just children—John and Leanna and Martha. I was the first little negro in the Parks kitchen. From the first they made a pet out of me. I was little like a doll and they treated me like a plaything—spoiled me—rotten. After Mr. Parks came to Arkansas he lived near what is now Prairie Grove, but what do you think it was called then—Hog Eye. Later on they named it Hillingsley for a man who settled there. We were two miles out on the Wire Road, the one the telegraph line came in on, Honey. Almost every conmunity had a ‘Wire Road’. It was the custom to give a girl a slave when she was married. When Miss Parks became Mrs. Blakeley she moved to Fayetteville and chose me to take with...

Read More

Biography of James L. McCoy

James L. McCoy has for many years been identified with the lumber industry both in Kansas and Arkansas, and manages his extensive interests from his home and headquarters at Coffeyville. Nearly all his active career has been spent in the West and in the early days of Oklahoma he went there as a pioneer and opened a farm. James L. McCoy was born in Atchison County, Missouri, May 21, 1862. Four generations of the McCoys have lived in this country, having come originally from Scotland, and the family were early settlers in the State of Ohio. Mr. McCoy’s grandfather, Andrew Cartwright, who was born in Maryland and followed farming in Ohio, was a consin of Peter Cartwright, the famous Methodist evangelist of the early days in Southern Ohio and other states. William McCoy, father of James L., was born in Pike County, Ohio, in 1836, and died at Coffeyville in 1905. He came out to Kansas and located at Coffeyville in 1886, and for many years was in the general merchandise business with store at the corner of Eighth and Walnut streets. He built the fine business block known as the McCoy or Junction Building at the corner of Eighth and Walnut streets. That building is still included in his estate, as are also two dwelling houses, one at 601 Willow Street and another at Third and Union streets....

Read More

Biography of J. R. Graves, M. D.

Coming to Boynton in 1919, Dr. J. R. Graves has already proven his skill and ability as a physician and surgeon and his practice is assuming large proportions. A native of Arkansas, he was born in Logan county on the 29th of November, 1883, his parents being G. W. and Mary (Suter) Graves, who were also born in that state. The paternal grandfather, Jacob Graves, was a veteran of both the Civil and Mexican wars, having charge of Fort Gibson, Indian Territory, during the latter conflict. He was a charter member of Masonic Lodge, No. 9, at Clarksville, Arkansas, with which he was affiliated for seventy-eight years, and passed away August 8, 1918, at the advanced age of ninety-four years. His son, G. W. Graves, devoted his entire life to farming pursuits and was a resident of Logan county, Arkansas. His death occurred on the 20th of December, 1899, when he had reached the age of forty years, but the mother survives and is still living on the old homestead farm in Logan county. In the acquirement of an education Dr. Graves attended the grammar and high schools of Paris, Arkansas, and after completing his course followed the profession of teaching for eleven years, proving very successful as an educator. During this period he had devoted his leisure hours to the study of medicine and on the 14th of...

Read More

Biography of Albert N. Earnest, M. D.

Dr. Albert N. Earnest, a surgeon of Muskogee, is numbered among the native sons of Oklahoma and his record as a successful member of the medical profession stands in contradistinction to the old adage that a prophet is never without honor save in his own country. Dr. Earnest was born near Webbers Falls, in Muskogee county, September 13, 1890, and is a son of J. T. and Ellen (Carlisle) Earnest. The mother is one-fourth Cherokee and was born in Texas, of which state the father is also a native. He came to the Indian Territory when a boy with his people, the family settling near Webbers Falls, where J. T. Earnest eventually became a farmer and stockman, following the business until 1918, when he retired from active life. For twenty-five years he lived upon a farm near Fort Gibson and when he put aside the work of the fields he removed to Muskogee and now makes his home at No. 1149 Cherry street. Dr. Earnest was reared and educated at Fort Gibson and also attended the public schools at Wagoner. Later he entered the University of Arkansas, in which he won the degree of Mechanical Engineer upon graduation with the class of 1907. Changing his plans, however, as to his future, he afterward became a medical student in the University of Tennessee at Memphis and was graduated there on...

Read More

Biography of Edward D. Hicks

Edward D. Hicks is numbered among Tahlequah’s representative business men and is one whose life record should be a stimulus to the effort and ambition of others. He was born at Fort Gibson, Indian Territory, on the 1st of January, 1866, a son of Daniel R. and Nancy J. (Rider) Hicks. His grandfather on the paternal side Elijah Hicks, was chief of the Cherokee Nation in Georgia and Indian Territory and died in 1856. Mr. and Mrs. Hicks came with the immigration of Cherokees in 1837 and 1838 to Indian Territory and the father became a successful farmer and stock raiser. He was influential in political and tribal affairs and for some time acted as United States interpreter. His death occurred in 1883. His wife died in 1866. Edward D. Hicks, whose name initiates this review, was the only child born to their union. In the acquirement of an education Edward D. Hicks attended the public schools of the Cherokee Nation and in due time enrolled as a student in the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. Upon the completion of his education he made his initial step into the business world as clerk in a mercantile establishment and after several years in that connection determined to start into business on his own account. He was active in the conduct of a mercantile business until 1895, but in that year...

Read More

Biography of Thomas Jefferson Harrison

Thomas Jefferson Harrison is justly accorded a place among the prominent and representative citizens of Pryor, for he belongs to that class of men whose enterprising spirit seeks to benefit others as well as himself. He also advances the general good and promotes public prosperity by his ably managed individual interests. He has excellent ability as an organizer, forms his plans readily and is determined in their execution. This enables him to conquer obstacles which deter many a man and has been one of the salient features of his success. Thomas Jefferson Harrison is a native son of Arkansas, his birth having occurred in Fayetteville, on the 7th of March, 1885. His father is W. W. Harrison, a native of Virginia, and his mother Emma Smith, who was born in North Carolina. His parents went to Arkansas at an early date. They removed to Kansas in 1890, and resided in that state for a short time. In 1891 they went to the Indian Territory. In the acquirement of an education Thomas Jefferson Harrison attended the subscription schools of Indian Territory and upon putting his textbooks aside made his initial step into the business world. He opened a news stand in a portion of the post office building, conducting it successfully from 1903 to 1908, when he sold out to go into the jewelry business. Six months later he disposed...

Read More

Biography of R. M. Godfrey

The present judge of Nowata county is R. M. Godfrey, who has been a resident of Nowata since 1914. He was born at Stockport, Ohio, on the 3d of June, 1887, a son of George N. and Effie L. (Scheetz) Godfrey, the former a native of Ohio. The progenitor of the Godfrey family in this country was Daniel Godfrey, who came to America from England at an early day and upon the out-break of the Revolutionary war enlisted for service under George Washington’s command. The paternal great-grandfather, Prince Godfrey, was born in Maine and removed from that state to Ohio in 1821, locating near Stockport, in which community the family resided for many years. His son was Samual B., likewise a native of Maine, who married Catherine Ellison of Ireland. The mother of R. M. Godfrey died in 1894, while his father is still living on the old family farm at Stockport. He is fifty-eight years of age. R. M. Godfrey also has one brother, J. A., who is engaged in the mercantile business in Newark, Ohio. In the acquirement of an education R. M. Godfrey attended the Ohio public schools and after graduating from the high school at Bloomdale, spent three years at Marietta College, taking a general course. Subsequently he took up the study of law in the office of H. L. Pearson at Fayetteville, Arkansas, and...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Zeb Pettigrew Jackson

Zeb Pettigrew Jackson, whose activity in the field of real estate in Muskogee is bringing substantial results in the attainment of success, was born in Fayetteville, Arkansas, August 10. 1886, and is a son of U. L. Jackson, mentioned on another page of this work. Spending his boyhood days under the parental roof, he supplemented his early educational opportunities by study in the University of Arkansas, devoting a year to civil engineering. In April, 1908, he became associated with his father in the insurance, real estate and loan business which the father had established in 1901. The partnership was maintained between them until the father’s death on the 3d of January, 1918, since which time Mr. Jackson has conducted the business alone. He has handled a large amount of real estate, negotiated many important realty transfers and has gained a notable clientage. On the 4th of November, 1914, Mr. Jackson was married to Miss Terry Eberle of Muskogee, and they have two children, Z. P., Jr., and Lucille Wisdom. Mr. Jackson turns to golf and hunting for recreation and pleasure when leisure permits. He belongs to the Wauhillau Club, also to the Town and Country Club and fraternally is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Masons. He has taken the degrees of lodge, chapter and commandery and also of the Mystic Shrine. He has long...

Read More

Biography of W. J. Peak

W. J. Peak, physician, surgeon and druggist, Oakland; born in Warsaw, Gallatin Co., Ky., April 3, 1836, where he devoted his whole attention to his studies until he attained his majority, the last four years exclusively to the study of medicine, graduating from the St. Louis Medical College in the winter of 1860; he immediately commenced the practice of medicine at Warsaw, Ky., for a short time, when, in the spring of 1861, he located in Johnson Co., Mo.; during the summer, and in the fall of the same year, he went to Texas, where he was placed, from force of circumstances, in charge of the rebel hospitals at Ozark and St. Francisville, Ark., where he remained until the spring of 1862, when he was appointed Assistant Surgeon in the Union hospitals at Fayetteville, Ark., where he remained one year, when he received the appointment of Surgeon of the 14th Regiment, Kansas Cavalry, which position he held until the close of the war, being mustered out of the service at Lawrence, Kan., in the summer of 1865; he then returned to Johnson Co., Mo., where he remained a short time, when he removed to Coles Co., Ill., and located in Morgan Tp. in the winter of 1866, where he followed his profession until 1876, when he removed to Oakland, and engaged in the drug trade, still giving his whole...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest