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Location: Fauquier County VA

Biographical Sketch of Daniel Pegram

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The parents of Daniel Pegram were Scotch. Daniel was born in Petersburg, Va., but settled and lived in Bedford County, where he raised ten children, six sons and four daughters, each of whom was more than six feet in height. Thomas, a son of Daniel Pegram, married Nancy Hopkins, whose mother’s maiden name was Clark, and who had a brother, Chester Clark,, who drew $100,000 in a lottery. Thomas had but three children James L., Edward T., and William. The latter died in Virginia in his 19th year. James L. married Julia R. Oley, of Virginia, and settled in St. Charles County, Mo., in 1839, and in Montgomery County in 1845. Mrs. Pegram died in 1863. They had eight children, four sons and four daughters. Edward T. Pegram married Mildred Crane, of Montgomery County, and had two children, a son and a...

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Biographical Sketch of George Farrow

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The parents of George Farrow came from Scotland, and settled in Fauquier Co., Va., where George was born. He was a soldier of the war of 1812. He married a Miss Massey, and they had George, Jr., Nimrod, John, and Benjamin also two daughters. Benjamin married Lucy Smith, of Virginia, and they had John P., George, Mortimer, Joseph, Margaret, Sarah, Liney M., Mary L., and Amanda M. John P., Sarah, and Margaret came to Missouri. Sarah married William Browning, and settled in St. Charles County, but afterward removed to Lincoln County. Margaret married James B. Barton, and settled in St. Charles County. John P. was married in Virginia, to Susan M. Smith, and settled in St. Charles County in 1836. He subsequently removed to Troy, where he was employed in a store, and in 1844 he settled in Montgomery County, where he was elected Judge of the County Court, and held the office for twenty years. He afterward removed to Crawford Co.,...

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Biographical Sketch of John Hickerson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John Hickerson, of Fauquier Co., Va., married Elizabeth Baker, and their son, Thomas, came to Missouri in 1816, as teamster for John Ferguson, who settled in Darst’s Bot-tom. In 1818 Hickerson moved to Montgomery County and settled on the west bank of Loutre creek, near Loutre Lick. He soon after married Susan VanBibber, daughter of Major Isaac VanBibber, by whom he had thirteen children Melissa, Thomas A., James, Isaac V., Robert L., Alfouzo, and Susan J. The other six children died in infancy. Ezekiel Heckerson, a brother of Thomas, married Elizabeth Hayden, of Kentucky, and settled in Pike Co., Mo., in 1823, and in 1827 he removed to Illinois. His children were Etihue W., William B., Nancy A., James, Samuel, Silas L., Joseph L., and Mary A. Silas L. married Jane Allen, of Callaway County, and now lives in Mexico,...

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Biography of Patrick H. Coney

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now In many ways the State of Kansas during the last half century had had no more interesting, patriotic, versatile figure than Patrick H. Coney of Topeka. He came to Kansas after making a brilliant record as a soldier in the Civil war. He had been extremely successful as a business man, and his interests as a business man have extended over a wide and diversified field. No man in the country had exhibited a more intense loyalty and devotion to the welfare of the veterans of the great struggle between the North and the South. Mr. Coney is a lawyer, had practiced in Topeka over thirty years, is also a vigorous writer, had been a publisher in his time, and had always made his private success subsidiary to the public welfare. He was born in Newbury, Vermont, March 10, 1848, a son of Luke and Honor Berry Coney. The genealogy of this family is traceable back to Laogare, ancestor of the Southern Hy Nials, a son of Nial of the Nine Hostages, Kings of Ireland in A. D. 379. His father, Luke Coney, was born in County Roscommon, Ireland, and emigrated to the United States in 1839. After living a time in Boston he moved to Vermont, where he married, and in 1850 went to Wayne...

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Slave Narrative of Kitty Hill

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Kitty Hill Location: 329 West South Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Age: 76-77 I tole you yisterday dat my age wus 76 years old, but my daughter come home, an’ I axed her’ bout it an’ she say I is 77 years old. I don’t know exactly the date but I wus born in April. I wus a little girl ’bout five years ole when de surrender come, but I don’t’ member anything much’ bout de Yankees. I wus born in Virginia, near Petersburg, an’ mother said de Yankees had been hanging’ round dere so long dat a soldier wus no sight to nobody. ‘Bout de time de Yankees come I’ member hearin’ dem talk ’bout de surrender. Den a Jew man by the name of Isaac Long come to Petersburg, bought us an’ brought us to Chatham County to a little country town, named Pittsboro. Ole man Isaac Long run a store an’ kept a boarding house. We stayed on de lot. My mother cooked. We stayed there a long time atter de war. Father wus sent to Manassas Gap at the beginning of de war and I do not ‘member ever seein’ him. My mother wus named Viney Jefferson an’ my father wus named Thomas Jefferson. We ‘longed to...

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Biographical Sketch of Richard W. Blue

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Richard W. Blue, a Union veteran of Virginia and a leading lawyer and judge of Kansas, finally advanced to the halis of Congress as a representative of his adopted state. He was born in Wood County, Virginia, September 8, 1841, and was raised on a mountain farm near the present city of Grafton. In 1859 he entered Monongalia Academy at Morgantown, Va., and remained at that institution several years, first as pupil and later as teacher, Subsequently he entered Washington College, Pennsylvania, and remained there until he enlisted in the Third West Virginia Infantry, at the opening of the Civil war. Mr. Blue was wounded in the Battle of Rocky Gap, in Southwestern Virginia, promoted to second lieutenant for gallantry in action, and within a short time was commissioned captain. In one of the engagements he was captured and held as a prisoner of war at Libby prison and also at Danville, Va. The regiment was mounted and after the Salem raid was changed, by order of the secretary of war, to the Sixth West Virginia Cavalry. Its final service was in a campaign on the plains against the Indians at the close of the war. The regiment was mustered out at Fort Leavenworth, so that Mr. Blue was in Kansas during the early ’60s. After...

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Biography of William Proctor, M. D.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now WILLIAM PROCTOR, M. D. (deceased), was a physician who always loved knowledge and as a physician was devoted to his profession, careful in his investigations and gave all the time he could find in his busy life to books and periodicals devoted to medicine and surgery. His range of information was broad, and during the many years he pursued the calling of AEsculapius he won a wide reputation and a large practice. He was born in Petersburg, Virginia, in 1826, and died January 10, 1890, when sixty-four years of age. He was a graduate of William and Mary College, of Virginia, and studied law under his father, Thomas Proctor, who subsequently moved to Tennessee, where the Doctor was his stenographer. During the Mexican war the Doctor joined a Tennessee regiment and fought through the war. He was in the battle of Buena Vista and the City of Mexico, and had command of the flags on the rampart. For bravery he was promoted to the rank of captain on the battlefield at Chepultepec, when seventeen years of age. After the war he went to Warren County, Kentucky; where he studied medicine. Later he went to the University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, and subsequently began practicing in Warren County. When the Civil War broke out he was Government...

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Manahoac Indians

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Manahoac Tribe: Meaning “They are very merry,” according to Tooker (1895), but this seems improbable. Also called: Mahocks, apparently a shortened form. Manahoac Connections. The Manaboac belonged to the Siouan linguistic family; their nearest connections were probably the Monacan, Moneton, and Tutelo. Manahoac Location. In northern Virginia between the falls of the rivers and the mountains east and west and the Potomac and North Anna Rivers north and south. Manahoac Subdivisions. Subtribes or tribes of the confederacy as far as known were the following: Hassinunga, on the headwaters of the Rappahannock River. Manahoac proper, according to Jefferson (1801), in Stafford and Spottsylvania Counties. Ontponea, in Orange County. Shackaconia, on the south bank of the Rappahannock River in Spottsylvania County. Stegaraki, on the Rapidan River in Orange County. Tanxnitania, on the north side of the upper Rappahannock River in Fauquier County. Tegninateo, in Culpeper County, at the head of the Rappahannock River. Whonkentia, in Fauquier County, near the head of the Rappahannock. Manahoac Villages: Mahaskahod, on the Rappahannock River, probably near Fredericksburg, is the only town known by name. Manahoac History. Traditional evidence points to an early home of the Manahoac people in the Ohio Valley. In 1608 John Smith discovered them in the location above given and learned that they with the Monacan but at war...

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Biographical Sketch of W. H. Kirkland

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now W. H. Kirkland, who raised the first American flag in 1856 in the town of Tucson, was born in Petersburg, Virginia, July 12th, 1832, and emigrated to Arizona shortly after the Gadsden Purchase, eight or nine years before the organization of the Territory. He and his wife were the first white couple married in Arizona, being married in Tucson May 26th, 1860. In 1863 and 1864, he spent a good deal of time around Walnut Grove mining and ranching, about which time he purchased the ranch located by Pauline Weaver, and there engaged in stock raising. Later he settled in the Salt River Valley, where Mrs. Wayne Ritter, his daughter, was born in Phoenix on August 15th, 1871. She was born in the second house which was built in the city of Phoenix. Kirkland died in Winkleman, Arizona, January 19th, 1911, at the age of 78 years, and was survived by a wife and seven...

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