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Biography of Frank A. Glasgow, M. D.

Dr. Frank A. Glasgow, who for more than forty years has been a representative of the medical profession in St. Louis, where he entered upon active practice following his graduation from the St. Louis Medical College in 1878, was born in this city October 18, 1854, and is a son of William Glasgow, Jr., and Sarah L. (Lane) Glasgow, the latter a daughter of Dr. William Carr Lane, the first mayor of St. Louis and the first governor of New Mexico. In both the paternal and maternal lines Dr. Glasgow is descended from old American families represented on this side of the Atlantic through several generations. His grandfather in the paternal line was the founder of the city of Glasgow, Missouri, which was named in his honor. Dr. Glasgow acquired his more specifically literary education in the Washington University, completing his Course by graduation in 1875 with the Bachelor of Arts degree. He determined to make the practice of medicine his life work and accordingly became a student of the St. Louis Medical College, gaining his professional degree in 1878. He then studied for two years in Europe, after which he opened an office in his native city, and his record stands in contradistinction to the old adage that a prophet is not without honor save in his own country and among his own kin, for in the city...

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Biography of George R. Wendling, Jr.

George R. Wendling, Jr., of the Myers-Wendling Insurance Company of St. Louis, was born March 9, 1894, in Bloomington, Illinois. His father, George R. Wendling, was also a native of Illinois, his birth having occurred in Shelby county. He became a prominent attorney of that state and was a member of a constitutional convention of 1870 which framed the organic law of the commonwealth and had the distinction of being the youngest representative in that body, as he was only twenty-five years of age when elected. He won wide popularity as a lecturer as well as distinction in law practice. For several years he was associated in his professional activity with Judge Anthony Thornton, at one time chief justice of the state of Illinois. In politics Mr. Wendling was a lifelong democrat and exerted considerable influence over political affairs in state and nation, yet never sought nor desired public office. In early manhood he married Josephine Stephenson, a daughter of James Stephenson, who was born in Virginia. In tha family of Mr. and Mrs. George R. Wendling, Sr., were two daughters: Mrs. O. W. Catching, of Vicksburg, Mississippi, her husband being a prominent attorney there, and Mrs. William S. Conant, whose husband is a consulting engineer of Detroit, Michigan. The son of the family, George R. Wendling, Jr., was educated in the public schools of Washington, D. C., and...

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Biographical Sketch of Frank House Baer

Baer, Frank House; railroad business; born, Cleveland, Nov. 12, 1863; son of Anthony and Lucy May House Baer; educated, public schools of Cleveland; married Bryn Mawr, Penn., July 2, 1908; Elizabeth Hunter; one son Chisholm Spencer Baer, born, May 3, 1909; business career, clerk for The Standard Oil Co.; after 5 years business training with that company became a traveling salesman for Franklin McVeagh & Co., Wholesale Grocers of Chicago; in 1899 went to Europe for a year; upon my return entered the employ of the Nickel Plate R. R. as commercial mgt.; still in that capacity; also interested in other commercial enterprises; Democratic; was a candidate for the state senate when Bryan was making free silver a campaign issue; member public Library board three years; one of the fathers of the city grouping plan and was closely associated in the work with the originator of the group plan the late Professor Charles F. Onley; member Chamber of Commerce; Euclid Ave. Baptist Church Union; Rowfant, Euclid and Transportation Clubs; Collector of interesting relics, rare books, old Valentines; have finest collection of old valentines in existence, over 2,000 in number; a fine collection of old prints of Cleveland, have all but one of the early prints of the city in my...

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Biographical Sketch of J. H. Pierson, M. D.

J. H. Pierson, M. D., residing at Mission San Bernardino, is a native of New England, and came from a Puritan family on his father’s side, and an English Quaker family on his mother’s side. He is a son of Henry Pierson, a direct descendent of Abram Pierson, first president of Yale College, whose ancestors landed on Long Island in 1632. The subject of this sketch resided several years in Europe engaged in the study of medicine, and in 1861 he came back to America, and in 1866 went to Lake Superior as physician and surgeon for the Anglo-American Copper & Lead Mining Company. In 1867 he went to Arizona as surgeon for the Vulture Gold Mining Company, and remained there until 1882. He was married in 1870. In 1882 his health having failed somewhat he determined to discontinue the practice of his profession and try rural life. Accordingly he purchased a fine tract of 265 acres of land in Mission San Bernardino, on which he has over 1,000 orange trees, ten acres of peach trees, five acres of pears and other deciduous fruits. Here, surrounded by his family, the Doctor is leading a quiet life, looking after the education of his children and the interests of his...

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Biography of Daniel H. Lownsdale

DANIEL H. LOWNSDALE. – Mr. Lownsdale, the son of one of the earliest settlers of Kentucky, was born in Mason county, of that state, April 8, 1803. As was the custom in those days, he was married quite young – at the age of twenty-three – to Miss Ruth, the youngest daughter of Paul Overfield, the head of one of the most prominent families of Northeastern Kentucky. In obedience to the venturesome spirit inherited form his father, who had abandoned the comforts of civilization in his youth to become one of the conquerors of Kentucky, young Lownsdale, with his young wife, immediately removed to Gibson county, Indiana, which was then almost on the frontier. There he had the misfortune to lose his wife, who died in 1830, leaving him three children, one boy and two girls. Soon after this, making suitable provision for his children, he went south, remaining for a time in Georgia, engaged in mercantile pursuits. His health failing, he accepted the advice of physicians, and embarked in 1842 on a voyage to Europe, remaining abroad, visiting various countries, until 1844. Returning to the United States in that year, he found the country excited over the Oregon question; and, without parleying, he joined one of those devoted bands that crossed three thousand miles of hostile Indian country to settle our title by actual occupation. He arrived on...

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