Location: Eugene Oregon

Bean, Ormond Robert – Obituary

Retired Portland City Commissioner Ormond R. Bean, 89, a 31-year servant in city, state and federal governments, died early Friday morning [February 14, 1975] in the Parkview Nursing Home. Death was due to natural causes, said his son, Ormond Bean, Jr. First elected to the Portland City Council in 1932, the elder Bean served from 1933 until 1939 when he was appointed Oregon Public Utility Commissioner. From 1943 until 1946, Mr. Bean was a transportation director in America’s World War II effort, serving in Hawaii, Puerto Rico and the Middle East. Returning to Portland, he was elected once more to the City Council, serving from 1949 until his retirement in 1967. A former Portland City Hall employee, when asked why she considered Ormond R. Bean as her favorite city commissioner, said it was because “he was a man who never lost his temper nor raised his voice.” The description aptly summed up Bean who also had a long-standing reputation for his honest and integrity. He was often referred to as “the financial watchdog of City Hall.” Bean, who died early Friday at the age of 89, was once described as “the best public servant Portland ever had,” by Mark Grayson, a longtime colleague on the council. Grayson, who retired in 1970, served as Bean’s administrative assistant before running for the commission. “Ormond was a great gentleman and a fine...

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Biography of A. W. Patterson, M.D.

A.W. PATTERSON, M.D. – Doctor Patterson was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, October 14, 1814. He received his scholastic education in the village of Freeport, of his native state, and afterwards entered the Western University, at Pittsburgh. He subsequently studied medicine in the office of Doctor J.P. Gazzam, an old and prominent physician of that city, and in 1841 graduated with high honors from the Pennsylvania College of Medicine, of Philadelphia. Coming westward, he located at Greenfield, Indiana, and there practiced his profession until 1852, when he concluded to come to Oregon, and began the long and tedious journey known only to the pioneer. After his arrival he went to Lane county and there settled upon a Donation claim near the present site of the flourishing town of Eugene. The settlers in those days being few and far between, there was but little call for those skilled in his profession; and, being conversant with civil engineering, he engaged in the surveying business for a time. Among the contracts taken were several for the government, they being both in Oregon and Washington. The reports of surveys to be found in the surveyor-general’s office, submitted by him, will attest the guidance of a master hand. He also laid off the townsite of Eugene City. On the outbreak of the Indian war of 1855-56 in Southern Oregon, he at once offered his...

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Biography of James N. McClure

JAMES N. McCLURE. – In the person of the gentleman of whom who now write, we have one of those men, who have passed almost their entire life in this county, and hence are familiar with its resources and advantages in every department. James N. McClure was born on January 2, 1858, in Eugene, Marion county, Oregon, whence six years later he came with his parents, Charles M. and Laura V. (Pierce) McClure, to this county and here he has received his education and grown to his present prominent position in the county, having manifested, in the long years in which he has moved in the business and social circles of this realm, an uprightness, born of sound principles, and integrity and worth coupled with sagacity, that have given him a very enviable prestige throughout the county and stamped him as one of its most substantial and worthy citizens. When he came to this county he made his home with his parents until 1887 and then launched out into the world in independent action. In 1886, he purchased his present home of one hundred and sixty acres, which is situated eight miles south from Lagrande. The farm is well improved and every where hears testimony to thrift and industry. He has one of the finest orchards in the county and is skillful in the production of the fruits of...

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Biography of William Henry Canaday

It is fitting that in a work that purports to accord to the leading citizens of Harney county representation there should be special mention of the well known business man whose name heads this article and who has labored in our midst for a number of years, gaining a good success and making for himself a name and standing which are enviable. Madison Canaday was born in Hillsboro, Highland county, Ohio, on October 21, 1831, and when a boy went with his parent to Illinois and then to Iowa, whence they crossed the plains with ox teams in 1852. They settled in Douglas county, Oregon, the parents taking a donation claim. Later they removed to Yam Hill county. Miss Sarah E. Abbott was born near Springfield, Missouri, in 1842, and started across the plains with ox teams in 1852, having traveled to Texas and returned to Missouri in 1844. The train was a large on and the dreaded cholera attacked them and her father was the first victim to succumb to that terrible disease, passing away on June 9. Before the journey was completed the mother died also, the date being September 30, and she sleeps near where Baker City now stands. Thus from the happy eastern home this child was left an orphan on the dreary plains. She came on to Yam Hill county, Oregon. There she met and...

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Biography of Thomas Smith

THOMAS SMITH. – Mr. Smith, whose life labors have had as their result in one particular the upbuilding of the handsome village of Winchester, near the Umpqua River, was born in Oxfordshire, England, February 12, 1823; and he crossed the Atlantic with his parents in 1830. The first American home was at Rochester, and a year later at Euclid near Cleveland, Ohio; and in 1834 a removal was made to La Porte County, Indiana. Thirteen years were spent in Indiana with his parents; but in 1847 the desire to go forth and test his powers in competition with others induced him in company with a younger brother to come West. He made the six month’s journey as a teamster, armed with his rifle and equipped with an ox-whip. Many and varied were the scenes and incidents of the trip; and the usual hardships common to the most of the pioneers who came “the plains across” were suffered and endured. Not the least exciting of these were the fording of the numerous deep and swift mountain streams. Vast herds of buffaloes occasionally broke through the train; and continual rumors of Indian outrages, combined with oft-recurring pursuit of the savages for stolen stock, rendered the journey anything but monotonous. Only once was pursuit successful, – securing both stock and Indians. At other times they were glad to get themselves back safely....

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Biography of Hon. L. M. Ringer

HON. L.M. RINGER. – There is moral earnestness about a man who is able to hold his own convictions in the face of his neighbors and friends. We find such a man in Mr. Ringer. Born June 17, 1834, in Washington County, Maryland, he moved as a child to Amherst County, Virginia, there receiving his education, but later making his home in Stoddard  County, Missouri, engaging in the mercantile business. When the war broke out in 1861, that community was strongly for secession. Mr. Ringer was obliged either to enter the rebel army or to leave. He chose the latter course. The Confederate authorities at once confiscated his property. He thereupon went to Patterson, a post occupied by the Union forces, and was appointed clerk in the ordnance department. Soon afterwards he returned to Bloomfield, Missouri, a place held at that time by the United States troops. He was there appointed sheriff of the county, and adjutant of the post. He was thereafter elected to the position of sheriff and collector, having a detachment of volunteer state cavalry as body guard, and served continuously until the close of the war. he was “true blue” in that difficult position, enforcing the law rigidly during those distracted times, maintaining the national authority, and even compelling the respect of the rebel sympathizers themselves. In 1870 he left Missouri for Oregon, and settled...

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Biography of Eugene F. Skinner

EUGENE F. SKINNER. – Eugene F. Skinner, whose name is a household word throughout the length and breadth of Lane county, located in June, 1846, the Donation claim on which Eugene City, named for him, now stands. He was born at Essex, Essex county, New York, September 13, 1809, and is the youngest son of Major John Joseph Skinner of East Windsor, Connecticut, and a brother of St. John B.L. Skinner of New York, who was an influential officer in the Postoffice Department at Washington City, District of Columbia, under President Lincoln, and first assistant postmaster-general under President Johnson. Having lost his mother when but three months old, Eugene was favored with particular attention by his father, and when he attained the age of fourteen years was taken to Albany, Green County, Wisconsin, among relatives who were all interested in his welfare. While yet in early life, however, he went back to his native state, and to Plattsburg, the home of his childhood. Soon after this he turned his face westward and settled at Hennepin, Putnam County, Illinois. In youth he was of a most industrious disposition, and by diligent application obtained a good education, which fitted him in after life for many positions of trust and honor. Having lived on a farm, he naturally learned the intricacies of agriculture, and drank in of the spirit of adventure that...

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Biography of John P. Vollmer

One of the ablest and best known businessmen of Idaho is John P. Vollmer, of Lewiston. In past ages the history of a country was the record of wars and conquests; today it is the record of commercial activity, and those whose names are foremost in its annals are the leaders in business circles. The conquests now made are those of mind over matter, not of man over man, and the victor is he who can successfully establish, control and operate extensive commercial interests. John P. Vollmer is one of the strong and influential men whose lives have become an essential part in the history of Lewiston and the state. Tireless energy, keen perception, honesty of purpose, genius for devising and executing the right thing at the right time, joined to every-day common sense, and guided by great will power, are the chief characteristics of the man. Connected with various trade interests, the place that he occupies in business circles is in the front rank. Mr. Vollmer was born in Germany, January 25, 1847, his parents being Otto P. and Elizabeth (Fix) Vollmer, also natives of the same country. The father was a chemist, and he came to the United States in 1840. He became a naturalized citizen of this country, and in January 1843, returned to Germany and was married. In 1851 he brought his family to the...

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Biography of Judge Robert Eakin

JUDGE ROBERT EAKIN. – While Union county is so especially favored in having men of energy and talent in the various callings of human industry and learning, there is no profession that is more signally marked by the men of ability within its ranks than the legal, and as a leader among this class stands the gentleman, whose name initiates this paragraph, and who is well and favorably known throughout eastern Oregon. Judge Eakin is a profound student of the literature of his chosen profession, having added by careful and thorough research to a mind well poised for weighing the questions of human justice an erudition and fund of information that enables a searching and keen perception to select for the intricate problems that are daily encountered by a deciding jurist the authority needed and lay down the principles applying. Adding to this an acumen and breadth of grasp that are happily blended in his make-up, we have in Judge Eakin a judicial representative that the county of Union may well feel proud of and in whom, we are pleased to state, commendable pride is taken. At Elgin, Kane county, Illinois, Robert Eakin was born in 1848, being the son of Stewart B. and Catherine (McEldowney) Eakin, natives of Ireland. In 1866 the family removed to Willamette valley and settled at Eugene, Lane county, the parents remaining their until...

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Biography of Isaac N. Cromwell, M.D.

ISAAC N. CROMWELL, M.D. – Perhaps there is no calling of men with which the issues of life and death are so intimately connected s with that of the physician: hence it is that popular sentiment demands a class of men to take up this profession who are in every sense of the word the leaders of their fellows, and especially endowed with keen perception, careful and discriminating judgment, alert faculties and sympathy, with perfect self-possession and steady nerve. The subject of this sketch is one of the votaries of the medical muse, and is today one of Union county’s leading practitioners, being a man of deep erudition, sound principles and perfect integrity, which have been manifested in a long, skillful, and successful practice that is large and exacting. Isaac N. Cromwell was born in Murray county, Georgia, on November 27, 1841, being the son of James and Margaret (Shields) Cromwell, farmers of that section. In 1842 they removed to Tennessee, remaining there until 1850, then went to Smith county, Texas. In 1871 the father died, and in 1879, the mother passed away at Eugene, Oregon. Our subject was educated in the public schools of the various sections where he lived, and in 1868 went to New Orleans and attended the medical college at that place. In 1872, he migrated to Oregon and entered the medical department of the...

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Biography of Jasper G. Stevens

JASPER G. STEVENS. – Substantial, prosperous, capable, and esteemed by his fellows, the gentlman, whose name initiates this article, is one who has wrought here in the business world of Union for a goodly number of years, and is well established as one of the leading business men of Cove, where he operates a fine drug store, being also entrusted with the responsibilities of the postoffice of the town. Born in the Webfoot State, he cast his lot beneath its stars and has been educated and is acquiring and has achieved his success here, and to-day he holds an enviable position in the community which is fully merited by the capabilities and integrity that he constantly manifests. Our subject is the son of Mark and Frances (Clark) Stevens, being born on July 1, 1857, in Yam Hill county, Oregon. His father was a merchant of Eugene and was one of the early pioneers, who crossed the plains in 1850. Jasper G. received is early education in the public schools, and when the state university was founded at Eugene, he matriculated there and for four years he was assiduously laboring for mental discipline nad the acquisition of knowledge. Receiving his degree from the university, he spent six years in steady work in a drug store in Eugene, and then came to this county, settling in Cove where he opened a...

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Biography of Hon. John W. McAlister

HON. JOHN W. McALISTER. – It now becomes our pleasant privilege to outline in brief review the eventful career of the well known and highly esteemed gentlman whose name initiates this paragraph and whose life is connected with the county of Union, having been identified with it since his early boyhood and having been one of the potent factors in its development as also in making the laws which have proved so salutary for its progress and gaining, meanwhile, a reputation throughout the state because of the ability and sagacity displayed in the state halls of legislation, while no whit behind are the commendable moral virtues which his daily life exemplify, and the intrinsic worth of his character in constant display. Joyn W. was born in Putnam county, Missouri, on June 13, 1856, being the son of Harvye McAlister. When the son was six years of age, the father removed to the west with his family, having no particular objective point except Oregon. Having been safely guided through the long and dangerous journey until they came to Grande Ronde valley, and the teams being tired out, it was determined to stop and recruit, and the result was that Union county gained a prominent and substantial citizen. The father soon took up a squatter’s right on the land where our subject now resides, two miles east from Lagrande, and later...

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Biography of Asbury B. Crocheron

Asbury B. Crocheron has spent almost his entire life in Owyhee County and is now a leading resident of Silver City. His prominence in this locality is indicated by his long retention in public office, and at the present writing, 1899, he is filling the office of county sheriff. A native of Oregon, he was born in Eugene, that state, on the 25th of October, 1860. The family is of French origin and was founded in America at a very early period in the colonial history of the country. A settlement was made in New York, and when British oppression forced the colonies into insurrection, the great-grandfather of our subject entered the service and, with the rank of captain, participated in the struggle for freedom. J. H. Crocheron, the father of the sheriff, was born in New York City, and when gold was discovered in California made his way to the Pacific slope. Subsequently he removed to Oregon, where he was united in marriage to Miss Mary J. Crow, and in 1864 he brought his family to Idaho, locating in Idaho City, where he engaged in mining for about three years. In 1867 he came to Silver City, and in 1872 turned his attention to farming, his home being on Sinker creek. There he has since carried on agricultural pursuits, and, although now seventy-two years of age still superintends...

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Babb, Frances Elaine Breshears – Obituary

Wallowa, Oregon Frances Elaine Breshears Babb, 96, of Eugene, died April 4, 2004. She was born April 8, 1907, in Elgin to William and Margaret (Eckley) Breshears. Mrs. Babb grew up in the Wallowa, Vincent and Rondowea areas and graduated from Lostine High School. She worked for M. Crow and Company in Lostine for a time. She married Avon Dale Babb in 1926 and lived in the Eugene area for the last 79 years. Her interests included vegetable and flower gardening, crossword puzzles, University of Oregon football and basketball, and travel. She enjoyed family and friends and was well known for her sense of humor and her memory for facts, figures, people and places. Survivors include daughters Frances Latone of Chicago, Donna Brown of Portland, and Nancy Gilmore of Eugene; sons Alan and Lee Babb, both of Eugene; 20 grandchildren; and 26 great grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband in 1986, and a daughter, Rebecca, in 1984. Memorial services took place April 7, 2004, at the Musgrove Family Mortuary in Eugene. Memorial contributions may be made to the Assistance League of Eugene. Wallowa County Chieftain, Thursday, April 22, 2004 Contributed by Dixie Ricker Note: Additional obits can be found in the April 6, 2004 edition of the Register Guard, Eugene, Oregon and the April 10, 2004 edition of the Observer, LaGrande,...

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