Location: Erie County NY

Biography of Hon. Stukely Ellsworth

HON. STUKELY ELLSWORTH. – This eminent lawyer of our state was born at Stockton, Chautauqua county, New York, December 18, 1826. Among his distinguished ancestors were Oliver Ellsworth, the third chief justice of the supreme court of the United States; Mary Lyon, founder of Mount Holyoke Seminary, and Mary Franklin, a sister of Benjamin Franklin. Colonel E.E. Ellsworth is also supposed to have belonged to the same family. Mr. Ellsworth received his academical education in Chautauqua county, and graduated at Yale College in 1847. He studied law at Buffalo, New York, nearly three years, and was admitted to practice before the supreme court of the United States at Washington in 1855. He settled the same year at Eugene City, Oregon, feeling a greater attraction for building up a new state than in seeking high position in the older communities. He was married in 1856, at Salem, to Miss Mary Stevens, of Coldwater, Michigan, a daughter of General J.H. Stevens, now of North Powder, Oregon, who was also one of the first pioneers of the state. Mr. Ellsworth engaged steadily in the practice of his profession, giving but little attention to politics, although frequently urged by his friends to do so. His only candidacy for office at the hands of any political party during his residence in Oregon was for the office of judge of the supreme court of the...

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Biography of Frank Johnson

FRANK JOHNSON. – The career of this well-known contractor is a clear case of the promotion of merit. He has acquired an enviable position in the business world from simple integrity and excellence of worth. He was born in Holland in 1844, and came with his widowed mother to New York in 1852. He went soon to Buffalo, and there began to learn the trade of a carpenter and joiner. The war breaking out, and an appeal being made to the patriotic young men of the city, he volunteered as a soldier and served gallantly until the close of the struggle, meriting and receiving special mention by the colonel of the regiment. He saw severe work both in the West and South and at sea, and was wounded in a skirmish on the line of the Mobile & Charleston Railway. Being mustered out at Albany in 1866, he returned home and continued his studies as architect with Frederick Scott, one of the master mechanics of the city. In 1874 he began business on his own of the city. In 1874 he began business on his own responsibility, and made a specialty of first-class work and of overseeing construction. Tiring, however, of the city, and desiring to try the real American life of the West, he came to Washington Territory in 1880, and took up a farm in the Palouse...

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Julian, Marland R. “Marv” – Obituary

Baker City, Oregon Marland R. “Marv” Julian, 65, of Baker City June 28, 2002, at his home. His memorial service will be at 10 a.m. Tuesday at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 2177 First St. He was born Aug. 7, 1936, in Springdale, Ark. He was a son of Clyde Julian and Rhetta Grace “Mulkey” Julian. He attended high school at Shreveport, La. He entered the U.S. Air Force and was a weather officer from 1954 to 1958. He was based at Goose Bay, Labrador. After his discharge from the service, he worked in restaurants at Buffalo, N.Y., and Madison, Wis., learning Danish and German cooking. He then took a position opening up restaurants in the new Holiday Inn chain, which took him to Hollywood and eventually into Portland where he became chef of The Mayfair House and Jenos for many years. “Marv” was chef at the Baker Hotel in its heyday in the ’60s. He managed the Longview, Wash., Elks Club in the 1970s before returning to Baker City in the early 1980s where he opened a restaurant equipment and janitorial supply business. He traveled to Eastern Oregon and Southern Idaho communities from Pocatello, Idaho, to Hood River. He loved selling almost as much as he loved cooking for people. He was a member of Baker Elks Lodge, No. 338, and St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church. He will be greatly...

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Biographical Sketch of Peter Gobert

Peter Gobert farmer, and stock-raiser, S. 19; P. O. Oakland; one of the pioneers of Coles Co.; born in France Oct. 17, 1821, where he attended school until 11 years of age, when he emigrated with his parents to America, landing in New York the spring of 1832; going to Buffalo, he assisted his father upon a farm until 16 years of age, when he emigrated West in the spring, coming by way of the lakes to Chicago, arriving there June 11, 1837; coming directly to Coles Co., they located in what is now known as East Oakland Tp., before the organization of the same; here he engaged with his father farming until 1860, when his father retired from active labor, and Mr. Gobert assumed the management of the farm; he owns his brick residence, with good stables and other buildings, and upward of 400 acres of land, all under cultivation except twenty-five acres of timber. He married, June 8, 1843, Melinda R. Ashmore; she was born in Kentucky March 22, 1824; she died Feb. 21, 1861, leaving five children now living, viz., Samuel, Charles, Louis, La Fayette, Virginia. His marriage with Matilda A. Roberts was celebrated Oct. 17, 1861; she was born in Ohio, June 26, 1835; they have four children now living by this union, viz., Alice, Thomas, Napoleon, Frank. Mr. Gobert drove an ox team from...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles R. Briggs

Charles R. Briggs, portrait-painter, Charleston; was born in Washington Co. N. Y., Jan. 5, 1816; his father was a farmer and carriage-manufacturer in Easton; at the age of 17 years, he left home, and going to Troy, apprenticed himself to the trade of a coach-painter; he remained there four years and helped to paint the first passenger-coaches on the Albany & Schenectady Railroad; thence he went to Buffalo, N. Y., and entered the employ of Benjamin Rathbone, the great contractor of that city; about a year later, he went to New York City, and thence, shortly afterward, came West; this was in 1839; after spending a few months in St. Louis, he located in Coles Co., and, after farming one year, engaged in carriage, house and sign painting in Charleston. He early turned his attention to portrait painting, for which he had a decided talent, and for the past few years has made a specialty of the painting of fine stock, a branch of the art in which he is excelled by none in the State; he started the first livery-stable in Charleston about 1843, with one horse, and continued it about a dozen years, running it up to forty-two horses; in 1848, he opened a farm of 363 acres in the timber adjoining the city, fencing it in eastern style, mostly in ten-acre lots, and followed farming for...

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Biography of W. P. Ferguson

It is not the distinctive and specific purpose of biography to give expression of a man’s modest estimate of himself and his accomplishments, but rather to leave the record establishing his position by the consensus of public opinion. Judged in this manner W. P. Ferguson is numbered among the eminent representatives of the Iowa bar and for many years has been termed “the first citizen of Shenandoah,” not only in the fact that he was the first to establish himself in business here, but also because he has ever stood as a leader in the work of public progress and improvement, contributing in most substantial measure to those causes which have been foremost in upholding the legal and political status and in advancing the material, intellectual, social and moral interests of the city. Judge Ferguson is a native of Glasgow, Scotland, his birth having occurred in that city, July 29, 1843. He was a lad of five years when with his parents he crossed the Atlantic to America on a sailing vessel, which was thirty days in making the voyage. During that period the family lost an infant son and brother, who was buried with marine service on board ship. For a few years after their arrival in this country the family resided in Erie county, New York, and then removed to Guernsey county, Ohio, where judge Ferguson was...

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Biographical Sketch of Mathias Clouse

Mathias Clouse was a pioneer of Silver Creek Township, Ida County, Ia. He was born in Alsace-Lorraine, France, in 1843. He was the son of Charles and Elizabeth (Fisher) Clouse, natives of same country. The Clouse family had once lived in Amsterdam, and were a trading family. When the sons became of age they were sent up the Rhine River to establish trading posts. They emigrated to America and settled in Erie County, New York. Mathias received his early training and education principally in New York state. The grandfather Clouse also emigrated to the country, dying in Ohio at the age of 95 years. Charles, with his parents, made a temporary residence in Erie County, then emigrated to Dubuque County, Iowa. They returned to Webster County, Iowa, opening a farm there. Charles’ parents moved on to Fort Dodge where the father died in 1880. The mother went to Wheeler County, Nebraska. Mathias married Miss Isabella Cunningham (a native of Galena, Illinois) in 1869 in Dubuque County, Iowa. Isabella was the daughter of James and Isabella (Rogers) Cunningham, natives of Ireland, who came to America at an early day. They had settled in Illinois where her father died in 1865. Her mother moved to Plymouth County, Iowa. Mathias settled in Ida County in 1874 on Section 35 of Silver Creek Township.. The farm had springs and creeks, with ample water...

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