Location: Erie County NY

Brant, New York, 1865 Soldiers and Officers

Over 2,000,000 men enlisted for part or all of 1860-1865. These records do include some Indian Soldiers, and listed as Indian, others are listed with the Indian Reservation and these could be white or Indian. Pay Of The Soldiers In Civil War The Act of Aug. 4, 1854, put the pay of the private at $11 per month with a Corporal at $13, a Sergeant at $17 and a First Sergeant at $20. The Act of August 6, 1861, raised the pay of a private to $13 per month with no change in pay for non-commissioned officers. The Act of May 1, 1864, raised the pay of a private to $16 per month, a Corporal to $18 per month, a Sergeant to $20 per month and a First Sergeant to $24 per month. The Act of July 1, 1871, reduced the pay of a private to $13 per month and of the non-commissioned Officers accordingly. Solders and Officers, March 18, 1865 Edwin Avery, Private, Born Apr. 9, 1838, Collins, N.Y., enlisted Aug 27, 1862, 3 years, mustered out Jul 20, 1865. Parents: Arthur Avery and Nancy Sherman. Farmer. $100 Charles H. Ballard, Born Mar 18, 1842. Enlisted Sep 1862. Plain Store, Port Hudson, Donerville, Pleasant Hill, Sabens Crossroads, La. Winchester, Opequan, Cedar Creek. Parents: William Ballard and Susan Mitchell Mason. $100. William Bartlet, Sgt. Born Jan 9, 1843, Chautauqua...

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War with the Kah Kwahs

Some inquiries have been made in a prior paper, on the strong probabilities of this people, being identical with the Ererions or Eries. While this question is one that appears to be within the grasp of modern inquiry, and may be resumed at leisure, the war itself, with the people whom they call Kah-Kwahs, and we Eries is a matter of popular tradition, and is alluded to with so many details, that its termination may be supposed to have been an event of not the most ancient date. Some of these reminiscences having found their way into the newspapers during the summer in a shape and literary garniture, which was suited to take them from the custody of sober tradition, and transfer them to that of romance, there was the more interest attached to the subject, which led me to take some pains to ascertain how general or fresh their recollections of this war might be. My inquiries were answered one evening at the mission house at Buffalo, by the Allegany chief, Ha-yek-dyoh-kunh, or the Wood cutter, better known by his English name of Jacob Blacksnake. He stated that the Kah-Kwahs had their chief residence at the time of their final defeat, on the Eighteen-mile creek. The name by which he referred to them, in this last place of their residence, might be written perhaps with more exactitude to the...

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Ancient Battlefield on Buffalo Creek

Site of an ancient battlefield, with vestiges of an entrenchment and fortification on the banks of the Deoseowa, or Buffalo creek. The following sketch conveys an idea of the relative position of the several objects alluded to. Taken together they constitute the distinguishing feature in the archaeology of the existing Indian cemetery, mission station, and council-house on the Seneca reservation, five or six miles south of the city of Buffalo. As such, the site is one of much interest, and well worthy of further observation and study. The time and means devoted to it, in the preparation of this...

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Tonawanda Reservation Map and Occupants, 1890

The Tonawanda Reservation, in the counties of Erie, Genesee, and Niagara, New York, as originally surveyed in 1799, and as reserved by the treaty at Big Tree, covered 71 square miles. Coincident with a treaty between the United States and this band of Seneca Indians, March 31, 1859, promulgated November 5, 1859, the claim of the Ogden Land Company was extinguished, and the present reservation limits embrace 7,549.73 acres, lying partly in each of the counties of Erie, Genesee, and Niagara. One heavy dirt road, almost impassable in the spring or an ordinarily wet season, runs out from the center of Akron, sending a fork into the reservation at a distance of more than 3 miles. A second road, running northeasterly from Akron, enters the reservation at a distance of about 25 miles, at the point where the West Shore railroad enters the reservation, as indicated on the map. Up to this point the road is very well maintained. Half a mile from this point lies a triangular piece of land, which is occupied by the Indian Baptist Church, the Indian Methodist Church, an old council house, schoolhouse No. 2, and the new house of Eliza, with of David Moses, a chief of the Wolf tribe, and a prominent member of the christian party. From this central triangle 3 roads take their departure. The first runs northwest, leaving the...

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Cattaraugus Indian Reservation Map and Occupants, 1890

The Cattaraugus Reservation, in Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, and Erie Counties, New York, as delineated on the map, occupies both sides of Cattaraugus creek. It is 9.5 miles long on a direct east and west line, averages 3 miles in width at the center, dropping at is eastern line an additional rectangle of 2 by 3 miles. A 6-mile strip on the north and 2 “mile blocks” at diagonal corners are occupied by white people, and litigation is pending as to their rights and responsibilities. The Seneca Nation claims that the permit or grant under which said lands were occupied and...

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Reservations of the Six Nations in New York and Pennsylvania, 1723-1890

The accompanying map was prepared in 1771 under the direction of William Tryon, captain general and governor in chief of the province of New York, and is as nearly suggestive of the then recognized boundary of the Six Nations as any that has had official sanction. In 1851 Lewis H. Morgan, assisted by Ely S. Parker, a Seneca chief; and afterward an efficient staff Officer of General Grant, and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, prepared a map for a volume entitled League of the Iroquois, which aimed to define the villages, trails, and boundaries of the Five Nations as...

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Biography of Seth H. Powers

Seth H. Powers was born at Long Point, Canada, June 26, 1843. He is the son of Richard Powers, a farmer and stock-dealer of Vermont. His mother’s maiden name was Phoebe Howard, a native of Canada. His parents died when he was very young, and he then came to the United States and was educated in Ohio and New York. He served a long apprenticeship at the blacksmithing and machinist trade in Buffalo, New York, and has since followed that business in various States of the Union without interruption, except during the time he was in military service during the Civil War. He enlisted in May, 1861, in Company B. Eighteenth Infantry Illinois Volunteers, and served under the stars and stripes during three years of strife. He participated in the engagements at Belmont, Port Henry, Fort Donaldson, Pitts-burg Landing, Corinth, Vicksburg, and numerous skirmishes. He was discharged at Arkansas Post in 1864. After the return of peace he resumed his trade and worked at it with excellent success in Kentucky and various points since. He spent some time in St. Louis and also in St. Joseph, Missouri. He came to Jamesport on the first day of May, 1880, and formed a partnership with Mr. J. H. Higdon, and they have since conducted the carriage, wagon, and farm implement manufacturing business under the firm name of Powers & Higdon. Mr....

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Biography of Judge Joseph Oscar Cunningham

Judge J. O. Cunningham. The publishers and editors of this work feel that only a meager tribute can be paid to the memory of Champaign County’s most beloved citizen in the following brief review of his life. Judge Cunningham was a great historian. He contributed liberally to historical literature, was himself the author of a History of Champaign County, and in the closing months of his life he gave generously from the riches of his great collection and from his experience and memory in an advisory capacity to the compilation of the present work. Joseph Oscar Cunningham was born at Lancaster in Erie County, New York, December 12, 1830, and died at his home, 922 West Green Street, Urbana, on April 30, 1917, when in his eighty-seventh year. He was a son of Hiram Way and Eunice (Brown) Cunningham. Some of his early life was spent in northern Ohio, where he attended Baldwin Institute at Berea and also Oberlin College. In June, 1853, at the age of twenty-two, he came to Champaign County, and from that time forward his home was at Urbana. He had previously taught in the village school at Eugene, Indiana, but a month after his arrival at Urbana became associated as one of the proprietors and editors of the Urbana Union. He was a member of this firm of Cunningham & Flynn until 1858, and...

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Biography of Alfred Gray

Alfred Gray, a pioneer of Topeka and always active in promoting the agricultural and industrial interests of the state, was born at Evans, Erie County, New York, December 5, 1830. He was educated in his native state, and in the spring of 1857 located at Quindaro, Kansas. Mr. Gray was a member of the first State Legislature; was secretary of the Kansas State Board of Agriculture from 1872 to 1880, and was one of the commissioners to the Contennial Exposition at Philadelphia. His death occurred at Topeka on January 23, 1880, and his memorial monument stands in the cemetery at...

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Biographical Sketch of George M. Stanclift

Surely the subject of this review has passed the various stages of all kinds of pioneer work, with its hardships, deprivations and dangers, while he has met each point with a calm determination to overcome and make his way through it all, which he has done in a most commendable manner, being now one of the stanch and upright men of Harney and one of its well-to-do citizens, having his home on one of the finest pieces of soil in central Oregon, the same being one hundred and fifty-three acre, one mile north from Burns, which forms the family home and is a good dividend producer. Mr. Stanclift was born in Erie county, New York, on April 25, 1837, being the son of Reuben and Elvira (Adams) Stanclift. At the age of fifteen he went with the family to Cass county, Michigan, and thence to Berrien county, where his mother died. In February, 1855, he came via New York and Panama to San Francisco, crossing the Isthmus with the first through passenger train. On the sea they encountered great storms that made the passage unpleasant. Upon landing in California he went to the Poor creek country, and thence to Plumas county and mined. Yuba county he later took up mining and dairying together and in the spring of 1860 he went to the vicinity of Virginia City. But the...

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Biographical Sketch of Sieg Harzfeld

In the history of commercial development in Kansas City, Sieg Harzfeld deserves mention, nor is his reputation in this connection of a local nature. On the contrary his name is widely known in the great trade centers of the country and extensive and important business concerns owe their success in large measure to his capable management and sound business sagacity. Mr. Harzfeld is a native of Buffalo, New York, and a son of Colonel Albert Harzfeld, who volunteered for service in the Civil war and won the rank of colonel ere the cessation of hostilities. Both he and his wife were natives of Germany but crossed the Atlantic to the United States in early life. Throughout. his business career Mr. Harzfeld of this review has devoted his attention to merchandising and to the manufacture of ladies’ ready-to-wear clothing. He is interested in a chain of stores which are represented in New York, Detroit, Philadelphia, Cleveland and Chicago, and of the corporation which owns and controls these mammoth commercial interests he is the vice president and one of the directors. Mr. Harzfeld is likewise well known as a representative of various local societies, civic organizations and social clubs. Moreover, he belongs to the Chamber of Commerce and was a delegate to Washington as representative of that body and the National Dry Goods Association during the period of the World war....

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Biography of Benjamin E. Bradley

Benjamin E. Bradley, general manager of the Star of St. Louis and widely known in newspaper circles throughout the country, was born in Lafayette county, Missouri, October 13, 1869, and is a son of Benjamin A. and Martha R. (Briggs) Bradley. The father died August 30, 1919, at the venerable age of eighty-seven years, being then the oldest living native-born resident of Johnson county, Missouri. The family has been represented on American soil through many generations and the forebears of Benjamin E. Bradley have fought in all the different wars from the Revolution, while his son Philip was a soldier in France in the World war. Benjamin E. Bradley completed his education in the University of Missouri. His life has been given to the newspaper business and steadily he has advanced to prominence in journalistic circles. He was manager at one time of the Western Democrat at Missoula, Montana, afterward city editor of the Times, the Post and the Republican at Denver, Colorado, later became legislative correspondent of the Chronicle of San Francisco and upon his return to the middle west accepted the position of managing editor of the Inter-Ocean of Chicago. Returning to his native state, he was assistant general manager of the Post-Dispatch until he became identified with the Star, of which he is now vice president and general manager. Mr. Bradley has been married twice. In...

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Biography of Judge John T. Morgan

The gentleman whose name heads this review has been a conspicuous figure in the legislative and judicial history of two states. Probably the public life of no other illustrious citizen of Idaho has extended over as long a period as his, and certainly the life of none has been more varied in service, more constant in honor, more fearless in conduct and more stainless in reputation. His career has been one of activity, full of incidents and results. In every sphere of life in which he has been called upon to move he has made an indelible impression, and by his excellent public service and upright life he has honored the state, which has honored him with high official preferment. Judge Morgan was born in Hamburg, Erie County, New York. His ancestors, leaving the little rock-ribbed country of Wales, became early settlers of New England, and through many generations members of the family were residents of Connecticut and active participants in the affairs which go to form’ the colonial history of the nation. In the war of the Revolution they fought for the independence of the country, and at all times have been loyal to American interests. James Clark Morgan, the father of the Judge, was born in Connecticut in 1798, and married Penelope Green, a native of Herkimer County, New York. He was an industrious farmer and served...

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Biography of Trowbridge C. Egleston

Occupying a prominent position among the leading businessmen of Caldwell, Idaho, we find the subject of this biography, Trowbridge C. Egleston, wholesale and retail dealer in hardware, stoves, tinware, groceries, provisions, wagons and farm machinery. The business of which Mr. Egleston is the head was established in 1884 by Frank R. Coffin & Brother. In 1892 Mr. Egleston purchased the store and has since been at the head of its management, doing a prosperous business. He occupies a brick building, forty by one hundred and twenty-five feet in dimensions, with basement, and also has two large storehouses, in which his supply stock is kept. Mr. Egleston is a native of Ohio. He was born in Madison, that state, June 19, 1857 and traces his ancestry to England. The progenitor of the Egleston family in this country was Eben Egleston, who settled in Massachusetts at an early date. He was by trade a tanner, and was a most influential and worthy citizen. His family comprised three sons. Russell S. Egleston. the father of Trowbridge C. was born in Westfield, Massachusetts, and in early life had excellent educational advantages. He graduated at both Auburn Theological Seminary and Williams College, and was for many years in the active work of the ministry of the Presbyterian Church. He preached in Madison, Ohio, Westfield, Connecticut, and Gaines, New York, his pastoral work covering half...

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Biography of Warren P. Hunt

Warren Palmerton Hunt, who has been a highly respected citizen of Lewiston since 1862, and is numbered among the California pioneers of 1854, was born in Erie County, New York, March 13, 1832, a son of Isaac and Diantha (Allbee) Hunt, the former a native of Vermont and the latter of the Empire state. In 1852 the father went by way of the Cape Horn route to California, but returned to his farm in Erie County, where he made his home until his death, which occurred in the eighty-sixth year of his age. His wife passed away in her eighty-second year, and both died on the old family homestead in New York, where they had spent the greater part of their lives. They were honest, industrious farming people, highly respected by all. They held membership in the Christian church, and Mr. Hunt gave his political support to the Republican party. Warren P. Hunt was the eldest in their family of three children, and was reared upon the old homestead, attending the public schools through the winter months, while in the summer he assisted in the labors of field and meadow. In 1854 he sailed from New York for San Francisco, reaching the latter place after a month’s voyage. He then went directly to the mines in Sonora, Tuolumne County, California, and engaged in mining for about six years, meeting...

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