Location: England

1850 Gazetteer of Ugborough England

UGBOROUGH is a neat and pleasant village, on the slopes of an eminence, surrounded by higher hills, 2½ miles E. of Ivybridge, and N.N.E. of Modbury, and 1½ mile S.W. of Kingsbridge Road Station. Its parish contains 1532 souls, and 8659 acres of land, generally fertile, and extending westward to the river Erme. It includes several handsome mansions, and many respectable farm-houses, and the small hamlets of Ludbrooke, Cheston, Nilham, Wrangaton, Fileham, and part of Ivybridge. There is a conduit in the centre of the village, and the church stands on the crown of the hill, which commands delightful views. Large cattle fairs are held here on the last Tuesdays in May and November, and here was formerly a monthly fair. The manor of Ugborough (Ulgeberge,) belonged to Alured Brito at Domesday Survey. It afterwards passed to the Briwere, Loring, Bonville, Grey, Harris, and Palk families. The heiress of the latter married Sir H. Carew, whose son, Sir Walter Palk Carew, Bart., is now lord of this and other manors in this parish, which comprises 200A. of wood, 150A. of orchards, and 2631A. of open common, rising in bold hills on the north. S. Savery, G. Mitchell, W. Widdicombe, J. Lang, J. P. Sawyer, and J. L. Templer, Esqrs., have estates here, and part of the parish belongs to several smaller owners, mostly freeholders. FOWELLSCOMBE, the large and handsome...

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1850 Gazetteer of Totnes England

TOTNES, an ancient borough and market town, which retains some portions of its once formidable castle, and gives name to an archdeaconry and deanery, to a large union, and to county court and polling districts; is picturesquely seated on the western bank of the navigable river Dart, opposite the suburb of Bridgetown, 10 miles N.W. by W. of Dartmouth, 22 miles S. by W. of Exeter, 22 miles E. by N. of Plymouth, 9 miles W.S.W. of Torquay, and 194 miles W.S.W. of London. It has a station on the South Devon Railway. The Dart is navigable to it for vessels of 150 tons burthen, and a steam packet plies daily between it and Dartmouth. Its parish contains 967A. 1R. 24P. of land, mostly in meadows and pastures; and had 2503 souls in 1801; 2725 in 1811; 3128 in 1821; and 3442 in 1831; but they had increased to 3849 in 1841, including 253 in the union workhouse. BRIDGETOWN, on the opposite of the river, in Berry Pomeroy parish, and in Haytor Hundred, is a handsome eastern suburb of the town, and forms part of the borough of Totnes, swelling its total population to about 4600 souls. The borough comprises the whole parish of Totnes and the manor of Bridgetown, the latter of which was added to it by the Parliamentary and Municipal Reform Acts of 1832 and 1835....

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1850 Gazetteer of Thurlestone England

THURLESTONE, 4½ miles W.S.W. of Kingsbridge, is a small scattered village, on rising ground, near the beach of Bigbury Bay. Its parish contains 437 souls, and 1768 acres of fertile land, including the hamlets of Buckland, Avenmouth, and Bantham, the latter of which is a small fishing village, with fine sands, and a salmon pool and harbour for barges. The Earl of Devon is lord of the manor, but part of the parish belongs to several smaller freeholders. The river Aven bounds the parish on the north, and the Bay on the west. On the coast is a remarkable arched rock, through which boats have sailed. It has for centuries braved the foaming surge: hence the proverb, “Brave every shock, Like Thurlestone Rock.” It is of the red conglomerate formation. Clannacombe, a large Elizabethan mansion, which has been modernised, is the seat of H. R. Square, Esq. The Church is an ancient structure, with a tower and five bells. The pulpit is finely carved, and partly composed of elegant pannels taken from the screen. The rectory, valued in K.B. at £25. 10s., and in 1831 at £383, is in the patronage of Sir. J. B. Y. Buller, Bart., and incumbency of the Rev. P. A. Ilbert, M.A., who has 36A. of glebe, and a large and handsome residence, erected by himself. The parish school, established in 1844, is supported...

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1850 Gazetteer of Stokenham England

STOKENHAM, or Stockingham, a small pleasant village, 5½miles E. by S. of Kingsbridge, has in its parish 1619 inhabitants, and 5920 acres of land, including six villages, extending 4 miles along the picturesque shore of Start Bay, of which the following are the names and population :- Chillington, 325 ; Beeson, 106 ; Beesands, 104 ; Halsands, 128 ; Kellaton, or Kellington, 105 ; and Torcross, 192. several of them are fishing villages, noted for fine crabs, which are in high repute in London. The parish extends southward to Start Point, where there is a lighthouse. It includes also the hamlets of Bickerton, Dunstone, Cornborough, and many scattered houses. TORCROSS, near Ley lake and Slapton Sands Hotel (see Slapton), is a pretty little bathing place, with several lodging-houses for visitors. An annual regatta is held here. The parish is generally fertile, and it extends westward in a picturesque vale to Frogmore, where there is a creek from Kingsbridge estuary. Sir R. L. Newman, Bart., of Mamhead, is lord of the manor of Stokenham, and has a neat marine residence, called Stokely House, built about 35 years ago. The manor has been held by the Fitzjohns, Fitzherbert, Courtenays, Hastings, and Carys, and was sold by the latter to the Newmans. Miss Burnell is lady of the manor of Kellaton, and A. B. E. Holdsworth, Esq., owns Stokenham Priory estate, and...

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1850 Gazetteer of South Milton England

MILTON, (SOUTH) a small village, in a deep fertile valley, 3 miles S.W. of Kingsbridge, has in its parish 475 souls, and 1556A. 3R. 11P. of land, including Upton and Sutton hamlets. Mrs. Prideaux is lady of the manor, but a great part of the parish belongs to W. R. Ilbert, Esq., of Horsewell House, a large and neat mansion, formerly the seat of the Roopes, from whom it passed to the Ilberts. Holwell belongs to Mrs. Gilbert and the Rev. E. Reed and the Earl of Devon have small estates here. The Church is a handsome structure, of perpendicular architecture, with a lofty embattled tower, containing six bells. The benefice is annexed to the vicarage of West Alvington, and the tithes were commuted in 1839, the vicarial for £128. 4s., and the rectorial for £219. 1s. W. R. Ilbert, Esq., is lessee of the latter, under the Dean and Chapter of Salisbury. The Parish Lands, &c., comprises 7 acres, and 4 cottages, let for £15. 6s., applied to the use of the church and...

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1850 Gazetteer of Slapton England

SLAPTON, a pleasant village on the acclivity, rising from the central part of the coast of Start Bay, 6 miles S.W. by S. of Dartmouth, has in its parish 726 inhabitants, 3260 acres of tithe free land, and many scattered houses, commanding fine views of the bay and coast. On the beach is the Sands Hotel, from which visitors have a fine promenade at low water along the sands to within a mile of Start point. The hotel is elegantly fitted up for the accommodation of visitors, and about 200 yards from the beach is a long fresh-water lake of about 300 acres, called the Ley or Hey, well stocked with fish and wild fowl, and divided from the sea in some places only by a ridge called the Long Sand. The manor is dismembered, and was formerly held of the See of Exeter, by the service of being steward at the bishop’s installation feast. Sir R. L. Newman, Bart., Major Bent, and the Paige, Tucker, Holdsworth, Bastard, Wise, Wakeham, and other families have freehold estates here. Pole or Poole Priory, in this parish, was long the seat of the Brians, Ameridiths, and Hawkins, and now belongs to Mr. Paige. The ruins of the old mansion were removed about 1800, except the lofty tower, which stands in the garden. The Church (St. Mary,) is an ancient structure, with a...

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1850 Gazetteer of Stoke-Gabriel England

STOKE-GABRIEL, 3½ miles S.E. of Totnes, is a neat village picturesquely scattered on the east bank of the estuary of the Dart, where a small creek projects about a mile eastward, and by being dammed up is made to turn the wheel of a tidal corn mill. Its parish contains 691 inhabitants, and 2595A. of land, fertile and well-wooded, and rising boldly from the Dart and the creek. It has several handsome mansions, and the small hamlets, &c., of Ash, Watton, and Portbridge. Henry Studdy, Esq., of Watton Court, a handsome modern Elizebethan mansion, is lord of the manor of Watton or Wadeton. Sandridge, a large and beautiful mansion, built by the late Lord Ashburton, is the property of Lord Cranstoun, but is now unoccupied. Sir R. L. Newman, Capt. Rhodes, Mrs. Douglas, and several residents, have estates here, mostly freehold. The Dart and its creek abound in salmon. The Church (St. Gabriel,) is a fine antique fabric, with a tower and five bells. It is mostly in the later decorated style, but has undergone many repairs, and the south entrance is in the Tudor style. It has several neat monuments, and in the church-yard is a remarkably large yew tree. The vicarage, valued in K.B. at £16. 11s. 10½d., and in 1831 at £170, is in the alternate patronage of Sir S. H. Northcote, the Rev. F. Belfield,...

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1850 Gazetteer of Stoke Fleming England

STOKE FLEMING is a pleasant modernised village, on a commanding acclivity, rising from the northern coast of Start Bay, 2½ miles S.S.W. of Dartmouth. Its parish contains 736 souls, and 3332 acres of land, mostly having a light fertile soil, resting on dunstone and slate. It includes the small hamlets of Ash, Buckford, Blackpool, and Emeridge, and several neat mansions, but Stoke House is now unoccupied. Sir H. P. Seale, Bt., is lord of the manor. Robt. Leach and John and H. N. Netherton have estates here, and Sir R. L. Newman and several smaller freeholders own part of the parish. The manor was part of the ancient inheritance of the Flemings, from whom it passed to the Mohuns, Carews, and Southcotes, the latter of whom sold it to the Seales about the close of last century. In a garden near the church are some remains of the ancient Anglo-Norman manor house, consisting of three arches of red sandstone; and some of its other remains are seen in the columns and capitals worked up in neighbouring buildings. The Church (St. Peter,) is an ancient fabric, in the early English style, with a lofty tower, containing six bells, which were recast in 1777. In the chancel are two fine brasses of the 14th century, and an ancient effigy. The rectory, valued in K.B. at £31. 6s. 0½d., and in 1831...

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1850 Gazetteer of Staverton England

STAVERTON is a small village at the south-eastern extremity of its large parish, on the south side of the river Dart, 3 miles N.N.W. of Totnes. Its parish comprises 1069 souls, and 5356A. 2R. 5P. of land, rising boldly from the Dart valley, and including the hamlets of Woolstone Green, Sparkwell, and Strechford, many scattered farm-houses, and about 700 acres of orchard grounds, celebrated for excellent cider. In the northern part of the parish, about two miles S. of Ashburton, are the Penn Recca Slate Quarries, which have been worked for centuries, but only on a small scale till the last eight years, during which the present spirited company of proprietors have expended about £30,000, chiefly in tunnelling and open cuttings, which dispense with machinery for lifting, and afford facilities for economical working, possessed by no other quarries in the west of England. About 100 hands are now employed in getting the slate and preparing it for roofing purposes. It is found in immense blocks, and is of a beautiful sage-green colour. Graet quantities of this durable slate are now sent to various parts of the kingdom, and many of the farm-houses, &c., in this neighbourhood, have been roofed with it since the time of Charles I. and James I. Ashburton Church was roofed in the former reign with slates from these quarries, and they remained till about ten...

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1850 Gazetteer of South Pool England

POOL, (SOUTH) a small village at the head of a navigable creek, five miles S.S.E. of Kingsbridge, has in its parish 555 souls, and 1929A. 3R. 18P. of land including, North Pool hamlet and part of Frogmore village. (See Sherford.) W. M. Praed, Esq., is lord of the manor of South Pool, and the Earl of Devon owns that of North Pool; but Thos. Cornish, Esq., Mr. Edw. Garland, and a few smaller owners, have estates here, chiefly freehold. The parish was anciently held by the de Pola, Punchardon, and Scobel families. The Church (St. Cyriac,) is a fine specimen of the perpendicular style, with a lofty tower and six bells. The interior has transepts, and has a neat and clean appearance. The screen is elaborately carved; and in the chancel is a handsome altar tomb or Easter sepulchre, with a representation of the Resurrection in front of it. Here are also monuments for members of the Dare, Lake, and Bastard families. The rectory, valued in K.B. at £22. 16s. 5½d., and in 1831 at £486, is in the patronage of W. M. Praed and A. Kelly, Esqrs., the former having two turns and the latter one. The Rev. Henry Taylor, M.A., is the incumbent, and has a large and handsome residence, and 52A. 2R. 23P. of glebe. The tithes were commuted in 1840, for £387 per annum. The...

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1850 Gazetteer of Ringmore England

RINGMORE, or Rinmore, a small scattered village, near Bigbury Bay, 4½ miles S. of MODBURY, has in its parish 362 souls, and about 1400 acres of land, bounded on the south and east by the sea and the mouth of the river Aven. H. R. Roe, Esq., is lord of the manor, formerly held by the Fitzstephen, Fishacre, and other families. The Duke of Somerset and a few small owners have estates in the parish. The Church is an ancient fabric, with a tower and two bells, and the living is a rectory, valued in K.B. at £19. 10s. 7½d., and in 1831 at £309, in the patronage and incumbency of the Rev. G. Butland. The poor parishioners have a house, given by Fras. Kirkham, in...

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1850 Gazetteer of Shaugh Prior England

SHAUGH PRIOR is a large parish of scattered farm houses, &c., in the valley of the river Plym, and among the hills and dales at the south end of Dartmouth(sic) Forest, extending from 7 to 10 miles N.N.E. of Plymouth. Near Shaugh Bridge, on the Plym, the Dewerstone rock rears its beetling crags in majestic altitude above the channel of the Cad rivulet; and in the vicinity are other granite tors. This neighbourhood is often visited by anglers and the lovers of picturesque scenery. Revels are held here at Easter and Whitsuntide. Th parish contains souls 698 souls and 7170 acres of land. Excellent clay is got here for the china manufacturers. Sir R. Lopes, Bart. is lord of the manor, which formerly belonged to Plympton Priory. The Earl of Morley, the Rev. S. W. Pearse, and other proprietors have estates in this parish. The Church is an ancient fabric in the perpendicular style, with a tower and six bells. The perpetual curacy, valued at £107, is annexed to that of Sampford-Spiney, in the patronage of the Dean and Canons of Windsor, and the incumbency of the Rev. S. W. Pearse, B.A., for whom the Rev. Hy. Colson, of the Tavistock, officiates. The patrons are appropriators of the great tithes. The parish land (6A.) and a house, were purchased in 1627 with £23 left by 35 donors. The land...

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1850 Gazetteer of Sherford England

SHERFORD, a small ancient village, in a pleasant valley, three miles E. of Kingsbridge, has in its parish 450 souls, and 2326 acres of land, including part of the village of Frogmore, which is situated at the head of a navigable creek, three miles E.S.E. of Kingsbridge, and has 232 inhabitants, of whom 90 are in this parish, 77 in Charleton, and 65 in South Pool parish. Here are lime kilns, coal wharfs, and granaries, where vessels of 100 tons load and unload their cargoes. The manor is dismembered, and the parish now belongs to W. Y. Clarke, W. Pollard, and L. Howard, Esqrs., and a few smaller owners. It anciently belonged to St. Nicholas’s Priory, Exeter, and afterwards to the Willoughby, Trevelyan, and Templer families. Kennedon, an ancient farm house of the early Tudor period, was successively the seat of the Prall, Halls, and Aldam families, the latter of whom sold it to L. Howard, Esq. Its tower was taken down by the Aldams. Malston, another farm house of the same age, was the seat of a family of its own name, and afterwards of the Stighulls and Reynells. The Church (St. Martin,) is a fine specimen of the decorated style, and has a lofty tower and five bells. There are stoups to the north and south doors, and in the chancel is a fine trefoiled piscina. The...

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1850 Gazetteer of South Brent England

BRENT, (SOUTH) a large irregularly built village, in the valley of the small river Avon, has a station on the South Devon Railway, five miles N.E. of Ivybridge, 6 miles W. of Totnes, and 7 miles S.S.W. of Ashburton. Its parish contains 1237 souls, and about 10,100 acres of land of which 6312 acres are cultivated, and the rest open common, &c., in the south-east angle of Dartmoor Forest, where the hills rise boldly from the valleys of the Avon and Erme. The parishe includes the small hamlets of Aish, Charford, Harbournford, Lutton, Wonton, Brent Mill, and many scattered farm-houses. South Brent was formerly a market town, and has still two annual fairs, on the last Tuesdays in April and September, the former called the lamb, and the latter the goose fair, but both are extensive marts for sheep, cattle, and horses, held “under the glove,” a glove being suspended on a pole during the fairs. The manor belonged to Buckfastleigh Abbey, and was purchased by Sir Wm. Petre after the dissolution. Mr. John Elliott holds the manor of Lord Petre, but most of the land was sold in parcels many years ago, and now belongs to Sir W. P. Carew, Dr. Butter and many smaller owners. The Church (St. Patrick,) is a large ancient fabric, in the decorated style, with a low tower and six bells. The Rev....

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1850 Gazetteer of South Huish England

HUISH, (SOUTH) a parish of scattered houses, from 4 to 5 miles S.W. of Kingsbridge, has 368 souls, and 1150A. 2R. 14P. of land, bounded by the beach of Bigbury Bay, and including the hamlets of Silverhill, Galmpton, and Hope Cove, the latter of which is a small fishing village, where lodging-houses are about to be erected for the accomodation of sea bathers, by the Earl of Devon, who owns most of the parish, and is lord of the manors. The Church stands in a deep valley, and is an ancient edifice, with a tower and four bells. The perpetual curacy is annexed to the vicarage of West Alvington, and the tithes were commuted in 1840, the vicarial for £90, and the rectorial for £260 per annum. The latter belong to the Dean and Chapter of Salisbury, but are leased to W. R. Ilbert, Esq., At Galmpton is a small chapel and school, belonging to the Plymouth Brethren. The church has 16s. yearly from the churchwardens of Aveton-Gifford, but the donor is...

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