Location: Elmore County AL

Koasati Indians

Koasati Tribe: Meaning unknown; often given as Coosawda and Coushatta, and sometimes abbreviated to Shati. Koasati Connections. They belonged to the southern section of the Muskhogean linguistic group, and were particularly close to the Alabama. Koasati Location. The historic location of the Koasati was just below the junction of the Coosa and Tallapoosa Rivers to form the Alabama and on the east side of the latter, where Coosada Creek and Station still bear the name. (See also Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, and Oklahoma.) Koasati Villages. Two Koasati towns are mentioned as having existed in very early times, one of which may have been the Kaskinampo. (See Tennessee) At a later period a town known as Wetumpka on the east bank of Coosa River, in Elmore County, near the falls seems to have been occupied by Koasati Indians. During part of its existence Wetumpka was divided into two settlements, Big Wetumpka on the site of the modern town of the same name and Little Wetumpka above the falls of Coosa. Koasati History. It is probable that from about 1500 until well along in the seventeenth century, perhaps to its very close, the Koasati lived upon Tennessee River. There is good reason to think that they are the Coste, Acoste, or Costehe of De Soto’s chroniclers whose principal village was upon an island in the river, and in all probability this...

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Koasati Tribe

Koasati Indians. An Upper Creek tribe speaking a dialect almost identical with Alibamu and evidently nothing more than a large division of that people. The name appears to contain the word for ‘cane’ or ‘reed,’ and Gatschet has suggested that it may signify ‘white cane.’ During the middle and latter part of the 18th century the Koasati lived, apparently in one principal village, on the right bank of Alabama river, 3 miles below the confluence of the Coosa and Tallapoosa, where the modern town of Coosada, Alabama, perpetuates their name; but soon after west Florida was ceded to Great Britain, in 1763, “two villages of Koasati” moved over to the Tombigbee and settled below the mouth of Sukenatcha creek. Romans and other writers always mention two settlements here, Sukta-loosa and Occhoy or Hychoy, the latter being evidently either Koasati or Alibamu. The Witumka Alibamu moved with them and established themselves lower down. Later the Koasati descended the river to a point a few miles above the junction of the Tombigbee and the Alabama, but, together with their Alibamu associates, they soon returned to their ancient seats on the upper Alabama. A “Coosawda” village existed on Tennessee river, near the site of Langston, Jackson county, Alabama, in the early part of the 19th century, but it is uncertain whether its occupants were true Koasati. In 1799 Hawkins stated that part...

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Koasati Indian Tribe

The Koasati Indians, as shown by their language, are closely related to the Alabama. There were at one time two branches of this tribe – one close to the Alabama, near what is now Coosada station, Elmore County, Ala., the other on the Tennessee River north of Langston, Jackson County. These latter appear but a few times in history, and the name was considerably garbled by early writers. There is reason to believe, however, that it has the honor of an appearance in the De Soto chronicles, as the Coste of Ranjel, 1Bourne, Narr. of De Soto, II, p. 109. the Coste or Acoste of Elvas, 2Ibid., I, p. 78. the Costehe of Biedma, 3Ibid., II, p. 15. and the Acosta of Garcilasso. 4Garcilasso in Shipp, De Soto and Fla., p. 373. The omission of the vowel between s and t is the only difficult feature in this identification. It is evident also that it was at a somewhat different point on the river from that above indicated, since it was on an island. The form Costehe, used also by Pardo, tends to confirm our identification, since it appears to contain the Koasati and Alabama suffix –ha indicating collectivity. Ranjel gives the following account of the experience of the explorers among these “Costehe:” On Thursday [July 1, 1540] the chief of Coste came out to receive them in peace,...

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Muskogee Indians

Muskogee. Meaning unknown, but perhaps originally from Shawnee and having reference to swampy ground. To this tribe the name Creeks was ordinarily applied. Also called: Ani’-Gu’sa, by the Cherokee, meaning “Coosa people,” after an ancient and famous town on Coosa River. Ku-รป’sha, by the Wyandot. Ochesee, by the Hitchiti. Sko’-ki han-ya, by the Biloxi. Muskogee Connections. The Muskogee language constitutes one division of the Muskhogean tongues proper, that which I call Northern. Muskogee Location. From the earliest times of which we have any record these people seem to have had towns all the way from the Atlantic coast of Georgia and the neighborhood of Savannah River to central Alabama. (See also Florida, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas.) Muskogee Villages It is difficult to separate major divisions of the Muskogee from towns and towns from villages, but there were certainly several distinct Muskogee tribes at a very early period. The following subdivisional classification is perhaps as good as any: Abihka (in St. Clair, Calhoun, and Talladega Counties): Abihka-in-the-west, a late branch of Abihka in the western part of the Creek Nation, Okla. Abihkutci, on Tallassee Hatchee Creek, Talladega County, on the right bank 5 miles from Coosa River. Kan-tcati, on or near Chocolocko, or Choccolocco, Creek and probably not far from the present “Conchardee.” Kayomalgi, possibly settled by Shawnee or Chickasaw, probably near Sylacauga, Talladega County. Lun-ham-ga, location unknown. Talladega,...

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Elmore County, Alabama Cemetery Records

Most of these cemetery listings are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Hosted at Elmore County, USGenWeb Archives Project Bethleham West – Partial Survey Bibb Cemetery – Elmore, Al Dawson Bradford Cemetery, Elmore, Alabama Estes-Butler Cemetery, Elmore County, Alabama Tri-Community Cemetery, Elmore Co., Al Goodship Cemetery – Millbrook, Elmore County, Alabama Hurd – Grey Cemetery, Elmore, Al Jackson Cemetery – Millbrook, Elmore County, Alabama “New” Mckeithen Cemetery – Robinson Springs, Elmore County, Alabama Elmore County Alarchives Cemeteries…..Mt. Gilead – Complete Survey “Old” Mckeithen Cemetery – Robinson Springs, Elmore County, Alabama Pineview Cemetery, Elmore, Alabama Robinson Springs Cemetery, Elmore, Alabama Ross Cemetery -North Of Millbrook, Elmore County, Alabama Robinson Springs Cemetery -Elmore County, Alabama St. James Baptist Church Cemetery, Elmore, Alabama...

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