Location: Duval County FL

Slave Narrative of Anna Scott

Interviewer: Viola B. Muse Person Interviewed: Anna Scott Location: Jacksonville, Florida Anna Scott, an ex-slave who now lives in Jacksonville near the intersection of Moncrief and Edgewood Avenues, was a member of one of the first colonization groups that went to the West coast of Africa following the emancipation of the slaves in this country. The former slave was born at Dove City, South Carolina, on Jan. 28, 1846, of a half-breed Cherokee-and-Negro mother and Anglo-Saxon father. Her father owned the plantation adjoining that of her master. When she reached the adolescent age Anna was placed under the direct care of her mistress, by whom she was given direct charge of the dining-room and entrusted with the keys to the provisions and supplies of the household. A kindred love grew between the slave girl and her mistress; she recalls that everywhere her mistress went she was taken also. She was kept in ‘the big house’. She was not given any education, though, as some of the slaves on nearby plantations were. Religion was not denied to the former slave and her fellows. Mrs. Abigail Dever, her owner, permitted the slaves to attend revival and other services. The slaves were allowed to occupy the balcony of the church in Dove City, while the whites occupied the main floor. The slaves were forbidden to sing, talk, or make any other sound,...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Willis Williams

Interviewer: Viola B. Muse Person Interviewed: Willis Williams Location: Jacksonville, Florida Occupation: Carpenter, Mail Clerk Willis Williams of 1025 Iverson Street, Jacksonville, Florida, was born at Tallahassee, Florida, September 15, 1856. He was the son of Ransom and Wilhemina Williams, who belonged during the period of slavery to Thomas Heyward, a rich merchant of Tallahassee. Willis does not know the names of his paternal grandparents but remembers his maternal grandmother was Rachel Fitzgiles, who came down to visit the family after the Civil War. Thomas Heyward, the master, owned a plantation out in the country from Tallahassee and kept slaves out there; he also owned a fine home in the city as well as a large grocery store and produce house. Willis mother, Wilhemina, was the cook at the town house and his father, Williams, did carpentry and other light work around the place. He does not remember how his father learned the trade, but presumes that Mr. Heyward put him under a white carpenter until he had learned. The first he remembers of his father was that he did carpentry work. At the time Willis was born and during his early life, even rich people like Mr. Heyward did not have cook stoves. They knew nothing of such. The only means of cooking was by fireplace, which, as he remembers, was wide with an iron rod across it....

Read More

Slave Narrative of Edward Lycurgas

Interviewer: Pearl Randolph Person Interviewed: Edward Lycurgas Location: Jacksonville, Florida “Pap tell us ‘nother story ’bout do war and ’bout de fust time you saw mamma.” It has been almost 60 years since a group of children gathered about their father’s knee, clamoring for another story. They listened round-eyed to stories they already knew because “pap” had told them so many times before. These narratives along with the great changes he has seen, were carefully recorded in the mind of Edward, the only one of this group now alive. “Pap” was always ready to oblige with the story they never tired of. He could always be depended upon to begin at the beginning, for he loved to tell it. “It all begun with our ship being took off the coast of Newport News, Virginia. We wuz runnin’ the bl0ckade – sellin’ guns and what-not to them Northerners. We aint had nothin’ to do wid de war, unnerstand, we English folks was at’ter de money. Whose War? The North and South’s, of course. I hear my captain say many a time as how they was playin’ ball wid the poor niggers. One side says ‘You can’t keep your niggers lessen you pay em and treat em like other folks.’ Mind you dat wasn’t de rale reason, they was mad at de South but it was one of de ways dey...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Rev. Squires Jackson

Interviewer: Samuel Johnson Person Interviewed: Rev. Squires Jackson Location: Jacksonville, Florida Occupation: Bricklayer, Preacher Lying comfortably in a bed encased with white sheets, Rev. Squires Jackson, former slave and minister of the gospel living at 706 Third Street cheerfully related the story of his life. Born in a weather-beaten shanty in Madison, Fla. September 14, 1841 of a large family, he moved to Jacksonville at the age of three with the “Master” and his mother. Very devoted to his mother, he would follow her into the cotton field as she picked or hoed cotton, urged by the thrashing of the overseer’s lash. His master, a prominent political figure of that time was very kind to his slaves, but would not permit them to read and write. Relating an incident after having learned to read and write, one day as he was reading a newspaper, the master walked upon him unexpectedly and demanded to know what he was doing with a newspaper. He immediately turned the paper upside down and declared “Confederates done won the war.” The master laughed and walked away without punishing him. It la interesting to know that slaves on this plantation were not allowed to sing when they were at work, but with all the vigilance of the overseers, nothing could stop those silent songs of labor and prayers for freedom. On Sundays the boys on...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Harriett Gresham

Interviewer: Pearl Randolph Person Interviewed: Harriett Gresham Location: Jacksonville, Florida Age: 98 Occupation: Field Worker Born on December 6, 1838, Harriett Gresham can recall quite clearly the major events of her life as a slave, also the Civil War as it affected the slaves of Charleston and Barnwell, South Carolina. She was one of a group of mulattoes belonging to Edmond Bellinger, a wealthy plantation owner of Barnwell. With her mother, the plantation seamstress and her father, a driver, she lived in the “big house” quarters, and was known as a “house nigger.” She played with the children of her mistress and seldom mixed with the other slaves on the plantation. To quote some of her quaint expressions: “Honey I aint know I was any diffrunt fum de chillen o’ me mistress twel atter de war. We played and et and fit togetter lak chillen is bound ter do all over der world. Somethin allus happened though to remind me dat I was jist a piece of property.” “I heard der gun aboomin’ away at Fort Sumpter and fer de firs’ time in my life I knowed what it was ter fear anythin’ cept a sperrit. No, I aint never seed one myself but —-” “By der goodness o’God I done lived ter waltz on der citadel green and march down a ile o’ soldiers in blue, in der...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Clayborn Gantling

Interviewer: Rachel Austin Person Interviewed: Clayborn Gantling Location: Jacksonville, Florida Age: 89 Clayborn Gantling was born in Dawson, Georgia, Terrell County, January 20, 1848 on the plantation of Judge Williams. Judge Williams owned 102 heads of slaves and was known to be “tolable nice to ’em in some way and pretty rough on ’em in other ways” says Mr. Gantling. “He would’nt gi’ us no coffee, ‘cept on Sunday Mornings when we would have shorts or seconds of wheat, which is de leavins’ of flour at mills, yu’ know, but we had plenty bacon, corn bread, taters and peas. “As a child I uster have to tote water to de old people on de farm and tend de cows an’ feed de sheep. Now, I can’ say right ‘zackly how things wuz during slavery ’cause its been a long time ago but we had cotton and corn fields and de hands plowed hard, picked cotton grabbled penders, gathered peas and done all the other hard work to be done on de plantations. I wuz not big ’nuff to do all of dem things but I seed plenty of it done. “Dey made lye soap on de farms and used indigo from wood for dye. We niggers slept on hay piled on top of planks but de white folks had better beds. “I don’t ‘member my grandparents but my mas...

Read More

Biography of George Miller, Jr.

George Miller, Jr., engaged in the practice of law in Muskogee, concentrating his efforts and attention upon civil law, was born in Leon county, Florida, December 18, 1882, and is a son of George and Frances (Shaw) Miller, both of whom were natives of North Carolina. The father owned a plantation, devoting his life to its improvement and cultivation. The son, George Miller, Jr., was educated in the public schools and in the South Florida Military Institute. He also studied stenography at Thomasville, Georgia, and was employed in the office of Duncan W. Fletcher, now United States senator, at Jacksonville, Florida. He studied law under Mr. Fletcher’s direction and afterward became a student in the law department of the University of Virginia, from which he was graduated with the class of 1908. In the fall of the same year he came to Oklahoma, and in 1909 he established his home in Eufaula, where he remained until 1912. During that period he was elected to the office of county attorney and served his term of two years. In 1915 he came to Muskogee and for two years filled the office of assistant United States attorney. Since that time he has engaged in the practice of civil law and has gained a large and gratifying clientage that has connected him with much important litigation tried in the courts, while at the...

Read More

Hubert Grey Todd of New Orleans LA

Hubert Grey Todd9, (James A.8, Alfred7, Caleb6, Caleb5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Sept. 1, 1872, in Sherman, Mich., married Jan. 16, 1907, Annie Lee, daughter of Frederick A. and Lee J. (Guice) Dicks, who was born Oct. 30, 1876, in Natchez, Miss., her father having been born in Mississippi and her mother in Minnesota. He went with his parents in 1874, to Burr Oak, Mich., where he attended school and graduated from the High School there in 1888. He took a commercial course in 1892. He began learning the printing business in March 1888, when he secured a position with L. H. Mallery. He later worked in various printing offices in St. Joseph county and Kalamazoo, Mich., from 1888 to 1897, as opportunity offered; in 1897 he secured a position with the United States Weather Bureau as printer, and a couple of years later he was promoted to the position of observer, continuing in that service until Oct. 1908, having been assigned to the offices in Columbus and Cleveland, O., Atlanta, Ga., Jacksonville, Fla., and New Orleans, La., resigning at the latter place, to go into the printing business for himself, which he has since continued. Mr. Todd was the president of the New Orleans union Epworth League for three years. Child: 2562. Katherine Grey, b. June 2, 1909, in New...

Read More

Duval County Florida Cemetery Records

Florida Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Florida county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Duval County Cemetery Records Hostd at Amelia Island Genealogical Society Houston Cemetery Hosted at Duval County Florida USGenWeb Archives Acosta Family Cemetery Anderson Cemetery Bigelow Cemetery Borden Cemetery, African American Brunson Cemetery, African American Chaseville Cemetery Church of Our Savior. Episcopal Clifton Cemetery Deese Family Cemetery Eubanks/Bowles/Dees Landing Cemetery Eubank Memorial Cemetery, African American Gilmore Cemetery Gravely Hills Cemetery H. Warren Smith Memorial Cemetery Hysler Cemetery Jerusalem Baptist Church Cemetery Julington Baptist Church Cemetery Live Oak Cemetery, aka Mt. Pleasant Baptist Cemetery aka St. Nicholas Cemetery #3, African American Lofton Cemetery Mt. Zion A.M.E. Cemetery, African American Mt. Zion Baptist Cemetery, African American Mt. Zion Cemetery, aka Lone Star, African American McCormick/Cosmo Cemetery McCormick aka Jones Cemetery Mandarin Cemetery Manning Cemetery New Berlin Cemetery New Mt. Zion Holiness Church Cemetery Old Mt. Herman Cemetery Old Mayport Cemetery Palm Springs Cemetery Parrish Family Cemetery Parrish Family Cemetery Parsons Family Cemetery Phillips Cemetery, aka Craig Swap Cemetery Pickett Cemetery Piney Grove Cemetery, African American Pinkston Cemetery Plummer Family Cemetery St. Nicholas Cemetery, African American Sloans Landing Cemetery Smith Cemetery Starratt Cemetery Tillotson Family Cemetery Turknett Cemetery Upton Cemetery Westview Cemetery Yukon...

Read More

Patterson, Lola B. Brannock Mrs. – Obituary

Baker City, Oregon Lola B. Patterson, 77, a 45-year resident of Oak Harbor, Wash., and a former Baker City resident, died Oct. 23, 2003, at Providence General Medical Center in Everett, Wash., after a long illness. Her graveside service will be at 3 p.m. Wednesday at Mount Hope Cemetery. There was a funeral today at Burley Funeral Chapel at Oak Harbor, Wash. Pastor Benjamin J. Norris officiated. Mrs. Patterson was born on May 10, 1926, at Baker City to Adoniram Judson Brannock and Alma E. Irvin Brannock. She was raised at Baker City where she graduated from high school. She married William C. Patterson on Jan. 5, 1950, at Boise. After living in Jacksonville, Fla., they moved to Oak Harbor on Whidbey Island, Wash., in 1958. Lola was a member of the Good Sam Club and AARP. She also was an active member of the Oak Harbor Church of the Nazarene. Survivors include her husband, William, at home; daughter, Sandy Moody, and her husband, Alex, of Anacortes, Wash.; sons, Arnold Morin of Ontario, Terry L. Patterson, and his wife, Colleen, of Stuart, Fla., and Robert L. Patterson, and his wife, Rosemarie, of Torrance, Calif.; grandchildren, Beth Patterson of Waterbury, Conn., Shannon, Taylor and Michael Patterson, all of Stuart, Fla., Billy Patterson of Torrance, Calif., Kristy Hobson and her husband, Jamal, of Redmond, Wash., Steven Moody and his wife, Holly,...

Read More

Biography of James Lotan

James Lotan was born in Paterson, New Jersey in 1843, and is of Irish descent, his father John Lotan, having been born in Ireland and emigrated to America in 1840. Until his twelfth year young Lotan attended the public schools of his native city. He then became an apprentice to the machinist trade in his uncle’s shop. After acquiring a full knowledge of his trade he went to Jacksonville, Florida, where with an elder brother he was employed until the war of the Rebellion began, when he returned home, and a few months thereafter, in May 1861, enlisted for two years in Company C, Ninth New York Volunteer Regiment, commanded by Col. Rush C. Hawkins. This regiment was first stationed at Fort Monroe and from there proceeded to Newport News, where it took part in a fight at Great Bethel, which resulted in one of the first victories for the Union army. It left Newport News, with Gen. Butler’s expedition and at Fort Hatteras joined Gen. Burnside’s command, proceeding with this division of the army up Pamlico Sound to Newbern, N. C., where it fought a battle. From this point it proceeded back to Roanoke Island and from there to Newbern, participating in the battle of South Mills and in numerous skirmishes along the line of March. From Newbern the regiment proceeded through the Dismal Swamps to Norfolk, Virginia,...

Read More
  • 1
  • 2

Search

Subscribe to AccessGenealogy

Enter your email address to subscribe to AccessGenealogy and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 5,934 other subscribers

It takes a Village to grow a Family Tree!


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Recent Comments

Subscribe to AccessGenealogy

Enter your email address to subscribe to AccessGenealogy and receive notifications of new posts and databases by email.

Join 5,934 other subscribers

Pin It on Pinterest