Location: Dutchess County NY

Biographical Sketch of George H. Olmsted

Olmsted, George H.; insurance; born, La Grange, O., Sept. 21, 1843; son of Jonathan and Harriet A. Sheldon Olmsted; educated, district school, Elyria High School, Eastman Business College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., graduate; married, Saybrook, O., Oct. 24, 1872, Ella L. Kelly; one daughter, Grace S., one son, Harvard; taught school three winters in Ohio and Wisconsin; entered insurance business in 1867; built up the large fire insurance business of George H. Olmsted & Co., and The Ohio & Indiana State Agency of Olmsted Bros. & Co.; being the largest agency in the United States of The National Life Insurance Co. of Vermont; director and state agt. The National Life Insurance Co.; director Central National Bank; Woodland Ave. Savings & Trust Co., Land Title & Abstract Co.; director and treas. Union Savings & Loan Co., National Safe & Lock Co.; trustee Cleveland Pulte Medical College; member Chamber of Commerce, and Union Club; Republican, and for forty years deacon in the Baptist...

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Biography of George Henry Walker

George Henry Walker occupies a prominent position in business, circles of Muskogee as vice president and general manager of the Osage Cotton Oil Company and has also served as mayor of the city since April, 1920. His birth occurred at Union Springs, Alabama, on the 1st of October, 1872, his parents being Merriott W. and Rexie (Goodwin) Walker, the former a prosperous planter and merchant. After mastering the elementary branches of learning George Henry Walker pursued a high school course in his native town and subsequently attended a business college at Poughkeepsie, New York. When his textbooks were put aside he secured a position as bookkeeper in an oil mill at a salary of sixty dollars per month and he has since been identified with cotton seed oil mill interests. It was in September, 1910, that George Henry Walker came to Muskogee, where he has remained throughout the intervening period of eleven years and has become well known in the oil mill business, being now vice president and general manager of the Osage Cotton Oil Company, which is capitalized for two million dollars and has its home office in Muskogee. The company conducts fourteen mills in Oklahoma, two in Arkansas, one in Louisiana and three in Florida and also operates one hundred cotton gins, the enterprise being one of extensive proportions and increasing importance. Mr. Walker possesses untiring energy,...

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Biography of Joseph C. Merritt

Joseph C. Merritt, chairman of the board of directors of the First National Bank of Chanute, the largest financial institution in Neosho County, is a pioneer Kansan. He came to Iola in 1871, and for a number of years was engaged in the cattle business. His home had been in Chanute since 1878. For more than thirty years, until he sold out in 1909, Mr. Merritt conducted a hardware store at the corner of East Main and Harlan Avenue. As successful merchant, it was only natural that he should participate in other business affairs in the city, and he early became identified as a director with the First National Bank, served as its president five years, and since 1912 had been president of its board of directors. The other officers of this bank are: A. N. Allen, president; D. N. Kennedy, vice president; W. F. Allen, cashier. The bank had a capital of $100,000 and a surplus of $20,000. For twenty-five years the modern bank building had stood at the corner of East Main Street and Lincoln Avenue. The Merritt family from which Joseph C. Merritt is descended came over from England to New York in Colonial days. His father, Joseph Merritt, was born in New York State, in 1784, spent most of his life on a farm in Putnam County, New York, and died at Patterson in that...

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Biographical Sketch of E. W. Pearson

E. W. Pearson, an enterprising farmer of Coffee County, was born in Bedford County, November 23, 1856. He is the son of Charles and Mary J. (Wells) Pearson, natives of Tennessee. The elder Pearson was a manufacturer in Bedford County until 1871, when he was a farmer and millwright in Coffee County, and finally at Sparta, Tennessee, where he is still milling. Our subject, the oldest of seven children, after an academic training attended Eastman Business College, Poughkeepsie, New York. Returning home he began the lumber business for I. W. Whitman, of Boston, and in August 1878, was employed by the Stone Fort Paper Company. In 1879 he became contractor for Hicks & Pearson, Flat Creek, and then began mercantile business at Gallatin. Returning to Coffee County he erected a lumber dressing and bending factory near Manchester soon moved it to Tullahoma. After a year in saw milling he built at Normandy a spoke and handle factory. After a time as drummer for Smith, Gifford & Co., of Nashville, he settled on his present farm. He married Fanny Price, of Manchester, October 28, 1880. Born to them were Charles L., December 29, 1882, and James P., February 20, 1885. Mr. Pearson is a decided democrat, and is school director and road commissioner. He and his wife are members of the Christian...

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Biography of Job W. Massey

Job W. Massey, farming and stock; P. O. Charleston; the subject of this sketch was born in Cheshire, England, June 28, 1822. He married Miss Sarah Gould Dec. 4, 1847; she was born in North Molton, Devonshire, England, Feb. 23, 1827, and died Aug. 8, 1877. They had six children, viz., William H., now living; Job Francis died at the age of 17, child died in infancy, Nannie now living, George E. died at 18 months of age and Joseph Charles died in his 18th year, from the kick of a horse. He lived in England about six years, when, with his parents, he came to the United States and settled in New Jersey, at Bellville, where his father engaged at his business of contracting machinist, he contracting to furnish machinery for some large calico print works located there; he also took extensive contracts for cotton-mill machinery in Tennessee. In 1835, they moved to Wappinger’s Falls, Dutchess Co., N. Y., where he lived eighteen years, except one year (1844), when he traveled in England with his brother, who was an invalid. His parents died during his residence at the Falls. In 1853, he went to Newburg, and engaged in model making, remaining three years, though part of the time he worked in New York City. In 1856, he and his brother, Henry, came West, looking Mr a location for...

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Biography of Illiam Francis Allison

Illiam Francis Allison was born September 7, 1847, in Lockhaven, Pennsylvania, and, like many men who achieve success in business or distinction in public life, his early years were passed on a farm, where are instilled habits of industry, and the seeds of a sturdy, selfreliant manhood are sown which ripen into true grandeur of character. Young Allison’s inclination being rather toward mercantile pursuits than agricultural, he left the farm and took a course in Commercial College at Poughkeepsie, New York. Though not of legal age, he exemplified his patriotism by enlisting in the Union army, and it was the hardships experienced in his country’s service that impaired his naturally frail constitution. After spending a few months in a drug store his health gave way, and he went west as far as Nebraska, seeking to improve it. There he engaged in a milling enterprise, which did not prove satisfactory, and he returned to Lockhaven and accepted a fine position tendered him with the firm of Hastings & Carson, manufacturing druggists in Philadelphia, on a salary of $1,600 a year. Soon after entering their employ, the step which determined his subsequent business career, he married Miss A. R. MacManigal, a friend of his childhood and youth. His health again failing, being attacked with hemorrhages of the lungs, he was compelled to resign his position much to the regret of his...

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Biographical Sketch of David Carpenter

(XVI) David, son of Increase (2) Carpenter, was born about 1800 in Dutchess county, probably. He lived at Victor. settled in Allegany county, and finally returned to Victor. He married a Miss Cator. Children: William. Charles, Frank. Henry, Martha. Louise, Mary, James. Curtis, mentioned...

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Biography of Joseph Raymond Hampson

JOSEPH RAYMOND HAMPSON – The work in which Joseph Raymond Hampson is engaged is eminently vital and important to the welfare of the people and the progress of the civic body. Mr. Hampson has had wide experience in this general field and has executed many large and important contracts, both for private individuals and for the United States Government. His outstanding success in these various achievements has given his name unusual recognition for a man still looking forward to many years of useful and progressive activity. He is a son of Louis and Viola (Lasher) Hampson, former residents of New York State. Joseph Raymond Hampson was born in Tivolo, Dutchess County, New York, February 5, 1890. His education so far as formal school attendance is concerned, was limited to the elementary school course, which he completed at the age of fifteen years. The technical preparations which fitted him in a minute and comprehensive way for his large responsibilities was secured by exhaustive study under the most discouraging circumstances and without the inspiration and aid of the formal group or the highly specialized instructor. Mr. Hampson is by nature a student and on his very self reliance his success is largely founded. He still constantly studies engineering and construction subjects, both general and special, is particularly interested at all times in the problems which are overcome by others in his...

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Biography of Matthew Hale

MATTHEW HALE A MAN of fine legal attainments and of high personal character, who has been a steady resident of Albany for the past twenty-two years is the Hon. Matthew Hale, On the 20th of June, 1829, in the little town of Chelsea, in the state of Vermont, this well-known jurist first saw the light of day. His ancestry is in every respect a notable one – including admirable combinations of intellectual, moral and religious principles. His father, Harry Hale, was a descendant of one Thomas Hale, an English yeoman, who immigrated to this country in 1638, and settled in Newbury, Mass. Harry Hale was a leading citizen in his day, and a man of great excellence of character. He was born in 1780, and when about twenty years of age formed a partnership with his brother Nathan, and became a country merchant, first at Windsor and afterward at West Windsor, Vt. He removed to Chelsea, Vt., where he still carried on a country store under the firm-name of Hale & Dickinson. A few years before the birth of his son Matthew, he retired from trade and devoted himself to the management of a grist mill and to farming. He was a captain of the militia, held various town offices; and in 1828, ’32, and ’36, represented Chelsea in the Vermont legislature. He was also for several years county...

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Wappinger Tribe

Wappinger Indians (‘easterners,’ from the same root as Abnaki). A confederacy of Algonquian tribes, formerly occupying the east bank of Hudson River from Poughkeepsie to Manhattan Island. and the country extending east beyond Connecticut River, Conn. They were closely related to the Mahican on the north and the Delaware on the south. According to Ruttenber their totem was the wolf. They were divided into 9 tribes: Wappinger proper Manhattan Wecquaesgeek Sintsink Kitchawank Tankiteke Nochpeem Siwanoy Mattabesec Some of these were again divided into subtribes. The eastern bands never came into collision with the Connecticut settlers. Gradually selling their lands as they dwindled away before the whites, they finally joined the Indians at Scaticook and Stockbridge; a few of them also emigrated to Canada. The western bands became involved in war with the Dutch in 1640, which lasted five years, and is said to have cost the lives of 1,600 Indians, of whom the Wappinger proper were the principal sufferers. Notwithstanding this, they kept up their regular succession of chiefs and continued to occupy a tract along the shore in Westchester County, N. Y., until 1756, when most of those then remaining, together with some Mahican from the same region, joined the Nanticoke, then living under Iroquois protection at Chenango, near the present Binghamton, N. Y., and, With them, were finally merged into the Delaware. Their last public appearance was...

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Biography of John Leo McLaughlin

JOHN LEO McLAUGHLIN – There is a man in Pittsfield who is the living exponent of the principle put into practical use in that city, to wit: That a cooperative coal yard can be run successfully over a course of years, secure good coal for its customers, pay dividends to its shareholders and a patronage refund to its consumers, and at the same time disabuse the general public’s mind of the idea that such a scheme of business cannot be made to pay. The man who has demonstrated the above salient facts is John Leo McLaughlin, manager of the Pittsfield Cooperative Coal Company, which has made history for itself, as well as the city that has been the scene of its operations for eighteen years. Mr. McLaughlin is the man at the helm of the cooperative company, and he has at his back 2,000 satisfied customers and seven hundred stockholders, whose number includes some of the most influential people of the city; and the record of the volume of business done through the yards is a quarter of a million dollars gross a year. These magnificent results are the fruition of a plan that had its inception in a seemingly minor labor difficulty which arose when eight coal team drivers asked their employer to increase their wages from $9 to $10 a week; and upon his refusal of their...

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Biography of Stephen Henry Velie

The City of Moline owes its prominence throughout the United States, and in fact, throughout the entire civilized world, chiefly to its manufactories. And to Stephen Henry Velie, deceased, who, during his life, was conspicuously identified with several of that city’s leading manufacturing establishments, Moline is greatly indebted for the preeminence she now maintains in industrial enterprise. Mr. Velie was born April 21, 1830, near Hyde Park, Dutchess County, New York, his boyhood, until he arrived at the age of fifteen years, being spent upon his father’s farm in that county. During this period he attended the public schools of that locality. In 1845 he went to New York City, where he made his home with his grandfather, Stephen Herrick, who was engaged in the commission business. While with his grandfather, Mr. Velie obtained valuable business training and experience which was of great advantage to him in later life. After remaining for some time in the home of his grandfather, Mr. Velie went to Poughkeepsie in the same state, and in 1847 came west, locating in St. Louis, Missouri. Here he was employed in the wholesale grocery house of Edward J. Gay & Company. Mr. Gay, the head of the firm, made his home in Louisiana, and was afterwards elected to congress from his district in that state. At this time Mr. Velie lived with him at his Louisiana...

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Biographical Sketch of Silas Bowerman

(IV) Silas, son of Thomas (3) Bowerman, was born about 1720 in Falmouth. He removed to New Bedford and thence to Dover, Dutchess county, New York, in 1780. In 1790, the first federal census shows him living at Pawling, Dutchess county, with three males over sixteen, one tinder sixteen and seven females in his family. His second wife was Lydia Gifford. His three sons were Silas, Malthiah and Macy. Malthiah settled in Lafayette and built a house there where the hotel later stood and is ancestor of the Milan Bowermans, leaving sons Joseph, Esek, Otis and Sands. Macy settled on the Rowland Story farm. Silas is mentioned...

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