Location: Dublin New Hampshire

Biography of George Wallingford

George Wallingford, a prosperous business man of Claremont in the last generation, was born in Dublin, N.H., July 17, 1808, son of Ebenezer and Mary (Hildreth) Wallingford. The first ancestor, Nicholas Wallingford, settled in Bradford, Mass., in 1672. David Wallingford, of the third generation descended from Nicholas, was a Lieutenant in the Revolutionary War. Born September 25, 1744, he went to the war from Hollis, N.H., was a minute-man, served in four companies under Captains Dow, Towns, Emerson, and Goss, and took part in the battles of Bunker Hill and Bennington. His son Ebenezer, who was born October 5, 1780, came to Claremont about seventy years ago. By his wife, Mary, who was born in Dublin, Ebenezer became the father of eight children, as follows: Elvira, born August 24, 1804, who died October 5, 1884; Mary, born August 10, 1806, who died March 1, 1870; George, born July 17, 1808, who died July 18, 1863; Sarah, born May 27, 1810, who died March 10, 1894; Philander, born June 6, 1812, who became a Methodist minister, and died August 6, 1887; Elizabeth, born September 8, 1814, who died May 5, 1836; Frances, born September 23, 1816, who died August 14, 1848; and Catharine, born February 1, 1819. At the age of nineteen years George Wallingford came to Claremont, and there resided throughout the rest of his life. While he was...

Read More

William Yeardley Genealogy

William Yeardley (I), b. in England in 1752, came to Dublin, N. H., in 1776 and died there, June 23, 1805. He m. Sarah Twitchell, dau. of Gershom, b. 1750; d. in Dublin, Jan. 7, 1831. Of their six children the third was William (II), b. 1784; m. 1804, Rhoda Brooks, dau. of Joseph, b. Mar. 3, 1707; d. Apr. 5, 1837. Horace (III), the fifth of the nine children of William and Rhoda (Brooks) Yeardley, was b. in Dublin, Mar. 11, 1814, and m. Sarah Elizabeth Taylor b. Aug. 30, 1822. Their son, William Wallace, 1, was b. in Dublin, now Harrisville, Mar. 17, 1842. He spelt his name Yardley. He came to Sullivan, in 1884, and settled on the “Col. Hubbard” place, which had last been occupied by Alanson Nims, and previously by the latter’s father, Daniel Adams Nims. William Wallace4 Yardley, son of Horace3, was a farmer in Nelson and S., and moved to Marlow in 1899; m. Feb. 21, 1877, Mary Jane Rich, b. Stoughton, Mass., Oct. 13, 1858; d. in Lowell, Nov. 16, 1916; dau. of Charles C. and Ellen E (Dodge) Rich. Ch.: William Henry5, b. Nelson, Feb. 4, 1880. Frances Louisa5, b. Nelson, Sept. 23, 1881. Jennie Gertrude5, b. Nelson, Dec. 1, 1883. Mabel Alice5, b. S., May 7, 1885. Mary Edith5, b. S., Dec. 18, 1887. Florence Viola5, b. S., May...

Read More

James Wilson Genealogy

I. The ancestor of the Daniel2 Wilson family came from Tyrone, Ireland, in 1737, with the famous Scotch Irish emigrants. These emigrants were a hardy, industrious, long-lived, honest and sturdy race of people. A great proportion of New Hampshire’s most distinguished sons are found among their descendants. One of these emigrants was James1 Wilson. The history of Peterborough gives his name as WILLIAM. Later researches favor JAMES, but we are not positively sure of the name. Nor do we know who was his wife. They brought with them from Ireland a son, Robert2, and a daughter, Lettuce2. In this country they had at least two more sons, Daniel2 and James2. Robert2 lived in Peterboro’ and was the father of Anne3 (killed by a log falling from a fence upon her, in childhood), Hon. James3, William3, Anne3 (who m. Jeremiah Swan), Mary3 (who m. Gen. John Steele), Hon. John3 of Belfast, Me., (in the U. S. Congress in 1813-1814), Joseph3 and Sarah3 (m. Hon. John Scott Harrison, son of President William Henry Harrison, 9th President of the U. S. and father of Benjamin Harrison, 23rd President of the U. S.) Hon. James3 Wilson of Peterboro and Keene was the father of Gen. James4 Wilson, the well known lawyer and orator of Keene and a member of the 30th and 31st U. S. Congresses; Col. Robert4 Wilson, who was a well...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Abijah Richardson

Abijah Richardson, a native of Woburn, Mass., and a soldier in the Revolutionary war, was the first settler upon the farm on road 19, where Luke F. and Malachi Richardson now reside. He married Elizabeth Richardson and reared seven children, two of whom are living. His son Malachi married Tamesin, daughter of Aaron and Mary (Townsend) Greenwood, and reared a family of seven children, four of whom are now living. He still resides on the homestead farm, where five old people are living, aged respectively eighty-eight, eighty-six, eighty-six, seventy-nine and seventy-five...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Henry H. Piper

Henry H. Piper, son of Henry C., married Laura W., daughter of Rec George M. and Persis F. (Weeks) Rice, has one child and resides on road 12. He was appointed delegate to the Exposition of New Orleans for 1884, by the Bureau of Education at...

Read More

Dublin Village, Cheshire County NH

DUBLIN, a handsome post village, is located just north of the geographical center of the town, upon the eastern slope of the mountain chain of which Monadnock is the highest peak, and near the shore of Monadnock lake. When the town was divided it lost two flourishing villages, Harrisville and Pottersville, whose manufactures, etc.. are spoken of in the town sketch of Harrisville. Dublin, now the only village in the town, is surely not a “Deserted Village.” It lies upon one street, about a mile in length, extending east and west, two churches (Unitarian and Trinitarian Congregational), two stores, a fine town-house and a summer hotel constituting its accommodations for the public, while there are, along this street and upon the hills hard by, the summer houses of many families of Boston, New York and other cities, together with the dwellings of the little town’s citizens. As a summer resort the village has been growing in popular favor for the past ten years, till now it is almost impossible to accommodate all who apply. One of its attractions is the gem-like lake, while the summit of Monadnock is only five miles distant, and Beech hill rises from the north lake shore, its summit being reached about a mile therefrom. From the lake are taken a peculiar variety of trout, not found elsewhere in New England. Four fine summer residences...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Henry H. Smith

Dr. Henry H. Smith, the only physician and surgeon of this town, came here from Claremont, N. H., in October, 1865, commenced practice, and has remained here to the present time, meeting with great success. He married Arabella S., daughter of Thomas and Sophia (Appleton) Fisk. He was a naval surgeon in the late war, where he remained until its...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of John Knowlton

John Knowlton, a Revolutionary soldier, came to Dublin, from Massachusetts, about 1790, and was the first settler on the old homestead, on road 28. He married Susan Jennings and reared a family of seven children, among whom was Silas, who was twice married, first to Susanna Nutting, and second to Elizabeth Hardy. Only two of his six children ate now living. His son, Asa, married Lydia A., daughter of Luther and Lydia K. Darling, and has two children. He served in Co. A, 14th N. H. Vols., and was honorably discharged. He now resides on the homestead...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Warren L. Fisk

Warren L., son of Daniel and Esther Fisk, married Emily M. Mathews, of Faribault, Minn., has five children, and resides on road 12 in this town. He has been justice of the peace twelve consecutive years, town clerk twenty-three years, and town treasurer twenty-four...

Read More

General History of Dublin NH

DUBLIN lies in the extreme eastern part of the county, in lat. 45° 54′ and long. 4° 59′, bounded north by Harrisville, east by Peterboro, in Hillsboro county, south by Jaffrey, and west by Marlboro. It was originally granted by the proprietors of land purchased of John Tufton Mason, to Matthew Thornton and thirty-nine others, November 3, 1749, the charter being given by Col. Joseph Blanchard, of Dunstable, and was called Monadnock No. 3, or North Monadnock. The grant comprised an area of thirty-six square miles, or a territory seven miles long and five wide, and was given under the usual charter restrictions, among which that the whole tract be divided into seventy-one equal shares, each share to contain three lots, equitably coupled together, and to be drawn for at Dunstable, on or before the first day of July, 1750. On March 29, 1775, it was incorporated under the province laws, and legally given the name of Dublin. At this incorporation the township received a confirmatory charter from New Hampshire, issued by Governor Wentworth. In 1870 the township received a great curtailment of its territorial limits. Up to this time Nelson had bounded it on the north, the boundary line passing through the center of Harrisville village. But on the 2d of July of that year all the northern part of the town lying between the present northern line...

Read More

The First Congregational (Unitarian) Society, Dublin NH

The First Congregational (Unitarian) society, located at Dublin village, was originally organized, with forty members, in 1772, Rev. Joseph Farrar, being the first pastor. Their first church building, erected in that year, was succeeded by a second in 1818, and that in turn by the present, built in 1852. The latter is a fine wooden structure, capable of comfortably seating 400 persons, cost about $6,500.00, and is now valued, including grounds, etc., at about $9,500.00. The society now has forty-five members, with Rev. Hasket D. Catlin, pastor. The society has also a flourishing Sabbath school, with sixty-five...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Samuel Jones

Samuel Jones, from Framingham, Mass., came to Dublin in 1777, settling upon a farm on road 12, which he bought of Joseph Adams, the first settler on the farm. His son, Samuel, married Mary, daughter of Joshua Farnum, a soldier in the Revolutionary war. He spent his life on the home farm and reared a family of seven children. His son, Corydon married Abbie g., daughter of Col. Rufus C. Piper, of this town. He has four children, and is still residing on the old...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Samuel Pierce

Samuel Pierce came to Jaffrey, from Rindge, married Hettie Brooks, and reared a family of ten children, three of whom are now living. His son Charles W. married Abbie G. Gowing, of Dublin, who bore him thirteen children, eight of whom are dead. His widow now occupies the home farm here with her son Frank E., who married Ida M., daughter of James M. and Jane M. (Chandler)...

Read More

The Trinitarian Congregatianal Church, Dublin NH

The Trinitarian Congregatianal church, located about three-fourths of a mile from the postoffice, on the road to Peterboro, was organized by a council convened for the purpose, with Rev. M. Bradford, moderator, and Rev. T. s. Barston, scribe, November 21, 1827, with eight members. Rev. Henry A. Kendall was their first settled pastor. Their first house of worship was a brick structure, erected in 1835. The present edifice was put up in 1877. It is a neat wooden building, capable of seating 200 persons, and cost $3,000.00. The society now has ten members, with Rev. George B. Cutler,...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Francis Appleton Jr.

Francis Appleton, Jr., a soldier in the Revolutionary war, was born at Ipswich, Mass., May 28, 1759. His brother; Jesse A., was president of Bowdoin college. Francis came to New Ipswich, N. h-, with his parents when he was only twelve years old, and finally settled in Dublin in 1780. He married Polly Ripley, and they united with the church in 1790, of which he was a deacon thirty-six years. His son, Jessie R., was twice married, first to Louisa, daughter of Thaddeus Mason, and second to Abbie Sophia, daughter of Calvin Mason. Charles F., their only child now living, married Lillian g., daughter of Corydon Jones, and is now residing with his father on the homestead farm on road...

Read More

Search

Free Genealogy Archives


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest