Location: Detroit Michigan

Biographical Sketch of Paul J. Strahle

Paul J. Strahle is one of the younger business men of Champaign, is active and aggressive, and has already acquired a secure position as a unit in the commercial community. A native of Champaign, he was born February 20, 1892, the only son and child of John G. and Catherine (Dawson) Strahle. His mother was born in England and died at Champaign, March 1, 1912. John G. Strahle is also a native of Champaign County, was for a number of years a tailor by trade, but is now associated with his son in business. Educated in the public schools of Champaign, Paul J. Strahle early evinced a strong inclination and tendency for mechanical pursuits and he served an apprenticeship which in itself constituted the equivalent of a technical university course. For a time he was in the engineering department of the Cadillac Company at Detroit, also with the Studebaker Company, and from there removed to Dayton. Ohio, and had a thorough course of training in the engineering departments of the Delco plant. Mr. Strahle is an expert electrician and is master of practically every technical detail connected with the construction, assembling and repair of automobiles. In March, 1915, he engaged in business for himself at Champaign in electrical supplies and garage. He is now manager and proprietor of the Willard Service Station there. Mr. Strahle is unmarried. He is...

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Biography of John Baptist Miege

John Baptist Miege, first Catholic bishop of Kansas, was born in 1815, the youngest son of a wealthy and pions family of the parish of Chevron, Upper Savoy, France. At an early age he was committed to the care of his brother, the director of the episcopal seminary of Moutiers, and completed his literary studies at the age of nineteen. After spending two more years at the seminary in the study of philosophy, on October 23, 1836, he was admitted to the Society of Jesns. The following eleven years he spent in further study, a portion of the time at Rome under eminent masters. In 1847 he was ordained priest and completed his theological training in the following year. In the midsummer of 1849 Father Miege set sall for the Indian mission of North America, and reaching St. Louis in the fall was appointed pastor of the little church at St. Charles, Missouri, which included the mission of the Portage. Later he was removed to the house of probation at Florissant, Missouri, where he taught moral philosophy, and in 1851 was sent to St. Louis University. In the fall of that year he was appointed to the vicariate apostolic of all the territory from the Kansas River at its mouth north to the British possessions, and from the Missouri River west to the Rocky Mountains, being consecrated to that...

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Biography of Charles Wood Davis

A significantly varied, distinguished and interesting career was that of the late Charles Wood Davis, and fortunate it was for the State of Kansas that he early established his residence within its borders, for his splendid initiative and executive powers came most effectively into play in the furtherance of the eivic, industrial and general material development and progress of this commonwealth. He was one of the famous argonauts of the year 1849 in California, was long and prominently identified with railway interests, was a recognized authority in all matters pertaining to the basic industry of agriculture, was a pioneer in the exploiting of the coal-mining industry in Kansas, and there seemed to be no bounds set about his constructive energy and broad-minded public spirit. By very reason of his two personal names he became widely known and highly honored throughout the Middle West by the sobriquet of “Cotton Wood Davis.” He was one of the venerable and honored pioneer citizens of Sedgwick County, Kansas, at the time of his death, and it is signally fitting that in this history of the state and its people be entered a tribute to the memory of this strong, resourceful and noble man. Charles Wood Davis was born at South Dartmouth, Massachusetts, on the 17th of April, 1832, and was a scion of the staunchest of colonial stock in New England, where his...

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Slave Narrative of Sam McAllum

Interviewer: Marjorie Woods Austin Person Interviewed: Sam McAllum Location: Meridian, Mississippi Date of Birth: September 2, 1842 Age: 95 Place of Residence: Meridian, Lauderdale County To those familiar with the history of “Bloody Kemper” as recorded, the following narrative from the lips of an eye-witness will be heresy. But the subject of this autobiography, carrying his ninety-five years more trimly than many a man of sixty, is declared sound of mind as well as of body by the Hector Currie family, prominent in Mississippi, for whom he has worked in a position of great trust and responsibility for fifty years or more. While this old Negro may be mistaken at some points (the universal failing of witnesses), his impressions are certainly not more involved than the welter of local records. Mrs. Currie states that if Sam said he saw a thing happen thus, it may be depended upon that he is telling exactly what he really saw. Sam McAllum, ex-slave, lives in Meridian, Lauderdale County. Sam is five feet three inches tall and weighs 140 pounds. “De firs’ town I ever seen were DeKalb in Kemper County. De Stephenson Plantation where I were born warnt but ’bout thirteen miles north o’ DeKalb. I were born de secon’ o’ September in 1842. My mammy b’longed to de Stephensons an’ my pappy b’longed to Marster Lewis Barnes. His plantation wasn’t so...

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Slave Narrative of John Cameron

Person Interviewed: John Cameron Location: Jackson, Mississippi Date of Birth: 1842 John Cameron, ex-slave, lives in Jackson. He was born in 1842 and was owned by Howell Magee. He is five feet six inches tall, and weighs about 150 pounds. His general coloring is blackish-brown with white kinky hair. He is in fairly good health. “I’se always lived right here in Hinds County. I’s seen Jackson grow from de groun’ up. “My old Marster was de bes’ man in de worl’. I jus’ wish I could tell, an’ make it plain, jus’ how good him an’ old Mistis was. Marster was a rich man. He owned ’bout a thousand an’ five hund’ed acres o’ lan’ an’ roun’ a hund’ed slaves. Marster’s big two-story white house wid lightning rods standin’ all ’bout on de roof set on top of a hill. “De slave cabins, ‘cross a valley from de Big House, was built in rows. Us was ‘lowed to sing, play de fiddles, an’ have a good time. Us had plenty t’ eat and warm clo’es an’ shoes in de winter time. De cabins was kep’ in good shape. Us aint never min’ workin’ for old Marster, cause us got good returns. Dat meant good livin’ an’ bein’ took care of right. Marster always fed his slaves in de Big House. “De slaves would go early to de fiel’s an...

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Biography of Bert R. Parrot

Bert R. Parrott, a mechanical engineer and one of the directors of the Dorris Motors Corporation of St. Louis, was born in Mendon, Ohio, in December, 1873, his parents being Joseph J. and Harriet (Waters) Parrott. The father was a native of Virginia and was of French descent. The mother was born in Ohio belonging to one of the old families of Columbus, Ohio, whose founder was Mitchell Waters, the grandfather of Mrs. Parrott and recognized at one time as the merchant prince of that city. He established the first department store in that section of the country and in the course of years developed a business of mammoth proportions. The Waters family was of Scotch and English extraction. Mrs. Parrott died in 1908 at the age of sixty-four years and the death of Mr. Parrott occurred December 4, 1909, when he was seventy-eight years of age. He had followed farming and stock raising in Ohio for many years and during the last twenty-six years of his life lived retired in Battle Creek, Michigan. To him and his wife were born three sons and two daughters, of whom Bert R. Parrott is the fourth in order of birth. In the public schools of Ohio and Michigan Bert R. Parrott pursued his early education and afterward studied in Battle Creek College at Battle Creek, Michigan. When eighteen years of age...

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Biography of J. F. Otto Reller

J. F. Otto Reller, a representative of real estate interests in St. Louis, has the unique distinction of carrying on business in the same house in which he was born, his natal day being July 7, 1864. His father, August F. Reller, was a native of Hanover, Germany, and came to America in 1839 in company with his parents, when he was but three years of age. After attaining adult years he was engaged in the grocery and feed business and long remained an active factor in the commercial circles of this city, in which he passed away in 1907. He married Anna Marie Appel, also a native of Germany, but who was brought to America by her parents when quite young, their marriage being celebrated in St. Louis in 1861. They had a family of three sons and three daughters. J. F. Otto Reller, the second in order of birth was educated in the parochial schools, in Walther College, and in the Jones Commercial College, while still later he pursued the course of law in the Sprague Law College of Detroit, Michigan, from which he was graduated in 1907, with a very high standing in his class. During that time he was engaged in the grocery and feed business in connection with his father and remained in that association until 1908, when he turned his attention to the...

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Slave Narrative of Ambrose Douglass

Interviewer: Martin D. Richardson Person Interviewed: Ambrose Douglass Location: Brooksville, Florida Age: 92 In 1861, when he was 16 years old, Ambrose Hilliard Douglass was given a sound beating by his North Carolina master because he attempted to refuse the mate that had been given to him–with the instructions to produce a healthy boy-child by her–and a long argument on the value of having good, strong, healthy children. In 1937, at the age of 92, Ambrose Douglass welcomed his 38th child into the world. The near-centenarian lives near Brooksville, in Hernando County, on a run-down farm that he no longer attempts to tend now that most of his 38 children have deserted the farm for the more lucrative employment of the cities of the phosphate camps. Douglass was born free in Detroit in 1845. His parents returned South to visit relatives still in slavery, and were soon reenslaved themselves, with their children. Ambrose was one of these. For 21 years he remained in slavery; sometimes at the plantation of his original master in North Carolina, sometimes in other sections after he had been sold to different masters. “Yassuh, I been sold a lot of times”, the old man states. “Our master didn’t believe in keeping a house, a horse or a darky after he had a chance to make some money on him. Mostly, though, I was sold when...

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Biography of Jacob Kissel

JACOB KISSEL, junior member of the firm of Church & Kissel, began at a very early age to assume the practical duties of a business life, and by diligence, good habits, and a judicious use of natural tact has developed a character which will tell for usefulness in his day and generation. He has acquired a commercial standing which portends for him that prosperity and rank among his fellow-men vouchsafed alone to those who have worthily earned them. He was born in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1854, and is a son of Jacob Kissel who was born in Germany, but who came to this country when a young man. He was a brick mason and worked at his trade in St. Louis, Missouri. When only nine years of age Jacob Kissel was left an orphan and was then obliged to begin the battle of life for himself. When starting out in life it is a serious question if it is not better for a young man to begin at the bottom and depend entirely upon his own efforts to get along in the world. However great a boon this may be, few, indeed, would wish to take the chances of our subject. Thanks to a sturdy, industrious and honest German ancestry, he was strong, reliable and not afraid to work. These characteristics have held thus far through life, and...

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Biography of Daniel Morrissey

Daniel Morrissey. In the case of this well known citizen of Champaign success speaks for itself. Perhaps a few men remember the time when Daniel Morrissey was helping run a small weekly paper. That was more than half century ago. He early succumbed to an irresistible impulse to buy land. He bought with unlimited faith in the future of this locality, and his friends say that he also bought with almost unlimited skill and accuracy of judgment. Doubtless he made some mistakes, but they have not interfered with the big results. For the benefit of future generations, if not for the present, it is useful to state that Mr. Morrissey is one of the three largest land owners in Champaign County, and is president of the Morrissey Farm Land Mortgage Company. He was born in New York State, August 4, 1844, a son of James and Mary (Murphy) Morrissey, both of whom were natives of County Mayo, Ireland. His parents spent the last years of their lives in New York State. The spirit of independence, which is an Irish characteristic, was coupled in Daniel Morrissey’s equipment with unlimited industry and energy. At the age of fourteen he left home and went to Detroit, Michigan. There he had his first experience in a printing office. Subsequently he worked on the old Chicago Times at Chicago. His work as a printer...

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Biography of Pearl M. Hollingsworth

Pearl M. Hollingsworth. A newspaper which has had a fine and vitalizing influence in its community is the Fisher News, of which Mr. Hollingsworth is editor and proprietor. This publisher and editor is a journalist from the ground up, had his first acquaintance with the printing trade when a boy and has done much to develop the power of the press in this section of Champaign County and has made his paper indispensable to business men, farmers and citizens generally. Mr. Hollingsworth is a native of Vermilion County, Illinois, where he was born December 20, 1890. He is the youngest of three children, two sons and one daughter, born to Henry and Anna (Martin) Hollingsworth. The daughter, Delia L., is the wife of Howard Barnes, a well known evangelist living in Waukesha County, Wisconsin. The older son, Charles T., is a very successful evangelist and now ranks among the first in that profession in America. During the great revival which moved the country of Wales from center to circumference he was an active worker in that field. The father of these children was born in Illinois, had a common school education, and is now living at Arrowsmith in McLean County. He is a blacksmith by trade. His lineage goes back to England. He was born about 1852, has always been an ardent Republican and is a member of the...

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Wyandot Indians

Wyandot Tribe: Meaning perhaps “islanders,” or “dwellers on a peninsula.” Occasionally spelled Guyandot. At an earlier date usually known as Huron, a name given by the French from hurĂ©, “rough,” and the depreciating suffix -on. Also called: Hatindiaβointen, Huron name of Huron of Lorette. Nadowa, a name given to them and many other Iroquoian tribes by Algonquians. Telamatenon, Delaware name, meaning “coming out of a mountain or cave.” Thastchetci’, Onondaga name. Connection. The Wyandot belonged to the Iroquoian linguistic family. Wyandot Location. The earliest known location of the Huron proper was the St. Lawrence Valley and the territory of the present province of Ontario from Lake Ontario across to Georgian Bay. The Tionontati were just west of them on Lake Huron. (See also Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.) Wyandot Villages There are said to have been four confederated Huron tribes in the time of Champlain. Cartier, who first met these people, gives the following town names: Araste, on or near St. Lawrence River below the site of Quebec. Hagonchenda, on St. Lawrence River not far from the point where it is joined by Jacques Cartier River. Hochelaga, on Montreal Island. Hochelay, probably near Point Platon, Quebec. Satadin, location uncertain. Stadacona, on the site of the present Quebec. Starnatan, just below the site of Quebec. Tailla, near Quebec. Teguenondahi, location uncertain. Tutonaguay, 25 leagues above the site of...

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Biography of Charles Snyder

Charles Snyder is the proprietor of the Juliaetta Hotel, and is practically one of the founders of the town, having secured the establishment of the post-office, and also promoted many of the leading enterprises of the place. His labors have been most effective in its upbuilding, and his name is therefore inseparably connected with its history. Mr. Snyder is of German birth. He first opened his eyes to the light of day on the 8th of November 1827, and is of honorable German ancestry. He was educated in his native land, learned the cabinet-maker’s trade, and in 1850 bade adieu to friends and fatherland, preparatory to trying his fortune in the United States. When he came to this country he was entirely ignorant of the language of the people, but possessed native intelligence, a good knowledge of his trade and was energetic and ambitious, and through the combination of these qualities he has secured a handsome and creditable competence. Landing at New York he thence made his way to Cleveland, Ohio, where he worked two years. He then went to Detroit, Michigan, and accepted a position in the car shops, where he remained three years, and in 1855 he went to Kansas. That state was just opening up to civilization. He located at Wyandotte, just across the river from the present site of Kansas City, helped plat the town...

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Biography of Archibald Miller

Archibald Miller. Chase County was organized in 1859. One of the local citizens of the meager population then living here who took a prominent part in the organization, and one of the very few survivors of that time, is Mr. Archibald Miller, now living in comfort and retired from business cares at Cottonwood Falls, the county seat. Mr. Miller had witnessed all the development of this Kansas county, its growth and population, the development of its splendid resources as an agrioultural and stock raising section and had borne more than an individual share in all these developments, having been a resident of Chase County sixty years. Mr. Miller is several years past the age of fourscore. He has lived long and usefully and well and had made his generous prosperity almost altogether from Kansas land and Kansas business. He was born on a farm in County Antrim, Ireland, September 12, 1833, a son of John and Jane (McCarter) Miller. His father was born in 1802 and died in 1847, and the mother was born in 1816 and died in Chase County, Kansas, in 1879. Their children were six in number. four sons and two daughters, named Elizabeth, John, Archibald, Patrick, James and Jane. All of these are now deceased except Archibald. James whem last heard from had shipped as a sailor on a vessel sailing from London for India....

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Biography of Gerald Francis Wilson

Gerald Francis Wilson. Among the contributing factors to progress and prosperity in Clay County are the newspapers, and in taking them into account the Leader, at Longford, should by no means be overlooked. It is a live, wide-awake, progressive journal becanse such are the characteristics of its able editor and manager, Gerald Francis Wilson, who had the advantage of being a practical printer and before assuming charge of the Leader had had editorial experience. Gerald Francis Wilson was born at Racine, Wisconsin, November 4, 1891. His parents were Fred Morgan and Miranda (Kennedy) Wilson, the latter of whom was born in Pennsylvania in 1870 and died at Detroit, Michigan, in March, 1909. The Wilson ancestry is Scotch-Irish and the family to which Editor Wilson belongs had been in the United States since colonial times. His father, Fred Morgan Wilson, was born in Michigan in 1860 and had practically spent his life thus far in his native state and had always been identified with railroad affairs. He is a republican in political affiliation, fraternally is a Knight of Pythias, and belongs to the Episcopal Church. His family numbers three sons: Chester, who is a miner in Montana, and Gerald Francis and Leonard. Gerald F. Wilson attended the public schools of Omaha, Nebraska, until he completed his second year in the high school and then passed two years in Creighton University...

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