Location: Davis County IA

Biography of William Clarence Howie

Out of the depths of his mature wisdom Carlyle wrote, “History is the essence of innumerable biographies,” and Macaulay has said, “The history of a nation is best told in the lives of its people.” It is therefore fitting that the sketches of Idaho’s eminent and distinguished men should find a place in this volume, and to the number belongs William Clarence Howie, a prominent lawyer of Mountain Home. A native of Iowa, he was born in Davis County, near the Missouri state line, November 27, 1860. The Howie family originated in France. Two brothers, who were French Huguenots, were driven out of that country on account of their religious views and fled to Scotland, one locating in the highlands, the other in the lowlands. From the latter our subject is descended. He founded a family in Scotland that became renowned in the history of that country, many representatives of the name occupying prominent positions in public life. John Howie, the father of our subject, was born on Prince Edwards island. His parents had started for America, and in a storm the vessel on which they sailed sought refuge in the harbor of the island, whereon occurred the birth of the son. On reaching the New World the grandparents located in Bradford County, Pennsylvania, and later the grandfather removed to Illinois, where he died in the eighty-ninth year of...

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Biography of John Graham

JOHN GRAHAM. – The well known gentleman, whose name initiates this paragraph is both a reprsentative business man and farmer of Union county, his estate being four and one-half miles east from Elgin, where he has made a comfortable showing, while also he has dealt in real estate in this section and others, manifesting a keen judgment and practical ability that have won success. On May 24, 1853, John Graham was born in Davis county, Iowa, being the son of Jackson and Martha Graham, who were among the brave and devoted band of pioneers that crossed the dreary plains and brought civilization and light to these wild regions. Eighteen hundred and sixty-four was the date of their advent into Walla Walla county, Washington, where they took up land from the state and engaged in farming. A decade later they removed to Union county and there were occupied with the agricultural art until the time for retirment from activity came and they now rest in Elgin. Our subject remained with his father until the age of twenty-two had been attained and then independent action was inaugurated. He first took unsurveyed land, later selling it and removing onto a pre-emption, where he farmed for two years and then sold that also. Eighteen hundred and seventy-nine was the year when he removed to Garfield county, Washington, tilling the soil there until 1881,...

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Biographical Sketch of Herbert David Palmer

Palmer, Herbert David; lawyer; born, Iowa, 1877; son of David P. and Almira Lakin Palmer; educated, Southern Iowa Normal and Scientific Institute, B. S.; Yale University, L. B., 1900, “Magna Magna Cum Laude”, married, Norwalk, O., 1905, Elizabeth Flinn; one daughter; exmember Troop A, O. N. G.; has practiced law in Cleveland since 1900; with Wm. E. Cushing, John H. Clark and J. T. Siddall; member firm Cushing, Siddall & Palmer, 1910-1912, when appointed asst. gen. counsel for the New York, Chicago & St. Louis R. R. Co.; member Second Presbyterian Church, Chamber of Commerce, Chi Tau Kappa, Law Fraternity, Tyrian Masonic Lodge, and Cleveland Chapter, R. A. M., and Union...

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Biography of Charles T. Carpenter

Charles T. Carpenter is one of the pioneer bankers of Coffeyville, and for thirty years has been closely identified with what is now known as the Condon National Bank, being vice president of that institution. Mrs. Temple W. Carpenter, his wife, is one of the prominent women of Southern Kansas, has been a leader in religious, social and public affairs, and is president of the Carnegie Library of Coffeyville, and is the only woman who has ever been honored with a place on the school board of that city. The Carpenter family is a very old one in America, having been transplanted from England to Rehoboth, Massachusetts, as early as 1632. From there its descendants moved to Pennsylvania, and into North Carolina and Kentucky. Mr. Carpenter has ancestors who fought in the Revolution. Charles T. Carpenter was born at Palmetto, Tennessee, December 9, 1858, and belongs to a substantial stock of people who were extensive planters in early Tennessee, but were stanchly aligned with the Union cause and in the difficulties that grew out of the Civil war moved north of the Ohio River. Peter Carpenter, grandfather of the Coffeyville banker, was born in North Carolina in 1790. He was reared and married in his native state, became a planter, and moved his family to Tennessee, establishing a homestead on an eminence long known as Carpenter Hill. He was...

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Biography of Samuel W. Dunlavy, M. D.

Samuel W. Dunlavy, M. D. Of the sons of the Hawkeye State who have gained professional eminence and success in Kansas, Dr. Samuel W. Dunlavy, of Cherryvale, is a representative of the medical fraternity. Coming to this city in 1908, he had built up an important and extensive practice, and through the display of a constantly-increasing ability had won the confidence of the public and the esteem of his fellow practitioners. Doctor Dunlavy is a worthy son of a distinguished father and was born at Stiles, Iowa, August 31, 1873, his parents being Dr. James and Letitia (Von Natison) Dunlavy. The family of which he is a member came from Ireland and settled during colonial days in one of the New England States, removing thence to Indiana and finally to Iowa. Dr. James Dunlavy was born in 1843, at Bloomfield, Iowa, and was there reared and educated, his medical studies being pursued in the Keokuk College of Physicians and Surgeons. When the Civil war came on he enlisted in Company B, Third Iowa Volunteer Cavalry, with which he participated in many hotly-contested battles. Mr. Dunlavy, it is said, was the only private during the war to have the honor of capturing an officer wearing stripes. In open battle, at Mine Creek, Kansas, he captured the Confederate General Marmaduke, who afterwards became governor of Missouri. For this feat he was...

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Biography of Frank S. Johnson

We are pleased to accord to the representative citizen and genial gentleman, whose name heads this article, a space in the history of Wallowa County for the salient points of his career, both because of the activity that he has shown in the affairs of the county, for the advancement of its interests and the development and progress of it, as well as for the commendable personal qualities that he displays constantly, being a man of good ability and excellent force besides attending to important enterprises both for the good of the community and the progress of the section, while also his moral worth and bright example are such as to commend him to all lovers of good. Mr. Johnson was born on October 30, 1861, near Stiles, Davis County, Iowa, being the son of George W. and Elizabeth A. (Shelton) Johnson. The first eleven years of our subject’s life were spent in his native place and then in March 1873, the family removed to Indian valley, Plumas county, California. The years of his minority were spent in the acquisition of good education from the schools where he resided, and also in general farm work and in riding the range, being thus engaged in both California and Nevada. In 1881 he went to the Wood river mines in Idaho, and there operated at the blacksmith’s trade, which he had...

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Biography of Lewis Fleischner

Fleischner, Lewis, one of the leading merchants of Portland was born in the village of Vogelgesang, Bohemia, in 1829. He was educated in his native village and at Tissan a small town near his home. At the age of fifteen years he came to America, and for a short time remained in New York City. He then went to Philadelphia, where he was employed for five years by a dealer in horses and cattle. At the end of this period, in 1849, he came to Drakeville, Davis County, Iowa, and for three years was engaged in merchandising. In 1852 he started across the plains for Oregon, with an ox team. The land immigrants of this year experienced unusual hardships. Disease killed all of their cattle, while many of the immigrants perished from the cholera. After weary months of suffering Mr. Fleischner arrived in Albany, Oregon, where he embarked in the mercantile business, and for the following seven years did a very successful business. In 1859 he sold out and for one year conducted a store at the Oro Fino mines. In the fall of this year he took a stock of goods to Lewiston, Idaho, arriving on the first steamboat which landed at that place. There he remained until 1863, when he came to Portland, and entered into partnership with Solomon Hirsch and Alexander Schlussel, and bought out the...

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