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Location: Danville Virginia

Biographical Sketch of Richard W. Blue

Richard W. Blue, a Union veteran of Virginia and a leading lawyer and judge of Kansas, finally advanced to the halis of Congress as a representative of his adopted state. He was born in Wood County, Virginia, September 8, 1841, and was raised on a mountain farm near the present city of Grafton. In 1859 he entered Monongalia Academy at Morgantown, Va., and remained at that institution several years, first as pupil and later as teacher, Subsequently he entered Washington College, Pennsylvania, and remained there until he enlisted in the Third West Virginia Infantry, at the opening of the Civil war. Mr. Blue was wounded in the Battle of Rocky Gap, in Southwestern Virginia, promoted to second lieutenant for gallantry in action, and within a short time was commissioned captain. In one of the engagements he was captured and held as a prisoner of war at Libby prison and also at Danville, Va. The regiment was mounted and after the Salem raid was changed, by order of the secretary of war, to the Sixth West Virginia Cavalry. Its final service was in a campaign on the plains against the Indians at the close of the war. The regiment was mustered out at Fort Leavenworth, so that Mr. Blue was in Kansas during the early ’60s. After his discharge from the army he returned to Virginia, taught school, read law...

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Biography of C. W. Copeland

C. W. Copeland. A veteran in the ice business, C. W. Copeland is president of the Belleville Lee and Cold Storage Company. He is one of the leading business men and citizens of that thriving city. The Belleville Ice and Cold Storage Company was incorporated January 15, 1915, with Mr. Copeland as president and with G. H. Bramwell as secretary and W. K. Bramwell as treasurer. This plant had a capacity for the manufacture of twenty-five tons of ice per day, and had storage capacity for 5,000 tons. The plant, eligibly situated on the Rock Island Railroad tracks, covers 90 by 170 feet of ground, and is modern in every point of equipment. The company employs about seven hands during most of the season, and their ice is manufactured from an unfailing supply of pure water, drawn from a 145-foot well. Mr. Copeland had spent twenty-two years in the ice industry and had also had a wide experience in other lines of business. He was born in Danville, Virginia, in 1868, and represents an old Southern family. His parents were William N. and Eleanor F. Copeland. His father was a Confederate soldier during the war between the states. Reared and liberally educated in his native state, C. W. Copeland came West in 1889 and his mature career had been identified principally with the states of Arkansas, Missouri and Kansas....

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Cheraw Tribe

Cheraw Indians. An important tribe, very probably of Siouan stock, formerly ranging in central Carolina, east of the Blue ridge, from about the present Danville, Va., southward to the neighborhood of Cheraw, S. C., which takes its name from them. In numbers they may have stood next to the Tuscarora among the North Carolina tribes, but are less prominent in history by reason of their almost complete destruction before the white settlements had reached their territory. They are mentioned first in the De Soto narrative for 1540, under the name Xuala, a corruption of Suali, the name by which they are traditionally known to the Cherokee, who remember them as having anciently lived beyond the Blue ridge from Asheville. In the earlier Carolina and Virginia records they are commonly known as Saraw, and at a later period as Cheraw. We first hear of “Xuala province” in 1540, apparently in the mountain country southward from Asheville. In 1672, Lederer, from Indian information, located them in the same general region, or possibly somewhat farther north east, ” where the mountains bend to the west,” and says that this portion of the main ridge was called ” Sualy mountain ” from the tribe. This agrees with Cherokee tradition. Some years later, but previous to 1700, they settled on Dan river near the south line of Virginia, where the marks of their fields...

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Biographical Sketch of William B. Wall, M.D.

Dr. William B. Wall Santa Ana, the first Treasurer of Orange County, was born near Danville, Virginia, in1890. His literary education he received at the common schools in Mississippi, and his medical education at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, where he graduated in 1853. He further attended lectures in New Orleans in 1854, and began the practice of his profession in Mississippi, where he built up a fine patronage; but on the breaking out of the war he entered the Confederate army, in the Twenty-third Mississippi Volunteer Infantry, and was Surgeon for the regiment. He was elected First Lieutenant, and subsequently Captain, and served as Surgeon until the close of the war, when he was surrendered under General Joseph E. Johnston. He then followed his profession in Mississippi until 1875, when he came to California and bought land near Tustin, on which he planted orange trees and vines; and until the blight struck the grape and the scale the orange, Dr. Wall had the finest vineyard and orchard in Southern California. The neatness of his grounds and the fine quality of his fruits gave evidence of a horticulturist possessing superior knowledge and ability. Dr. Wall was elected County Treasurer at the first election in August, 1889, on the non-partisan ticket. He has held also other official relations. Politically he is an orthodox Democrat, and socially he is a Freemason,...

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