Location: Danville Missouri

Biographical Sketch of John B. Williams

John B. Williams was the son of Cordey and Mary Williams, was born upon a farm in Callaway county, Missouri, August 11, 1844. When he was two years old his parents removed to Montgomery county and settled on a farm near Danville, where he lived until seven years of age. In the spring of 1853 his parents again changed their place of residence, this time moving to Gentry county, near Albany, where he lived until he reached his seventeenth year, when, in 1861, he enlisted in the Union army, joining Colonel Manlove Cranor’s regiment of six months militia. At the expiration of that time he enlisted in Company A, First Regiment of Missouri State Volunteer Infantry, and served three years, part of the time on detail duty as clerk in the adjutant general’s office at Benton Barracks, St. Louis, where he was mustered out when his time expired. Leaving St. Louis he went to Mexico, Missouri, and established himself in the drug business with his brother, under the name and style of R. N. Williams & Bro., doing business eighteen months, when they removed to Albany, Gentry county, and carried on the drug business one year. In 1867 they removed to Gallatin, where they continued in the same business until 1868, when his brother retired from the firm, and six years later be also sold out. In 1876 he...

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Biographical Sketch of James Adams

James Adams, of Virginia, settled in St. Louis Co., Mo., in 1818. He married Sally Brown, and their children were Burrell, James, Polly, Sally, Elizabeth, Lucy, Rebecca, Martha, and Nancy. Burrell was a soldier in the war of 1812. He came to Missouri in 1816, with Judge Beverly Tucker, and was married in 1818 to Harriet Allen, a daughter of John Allen, who died in 1830. Mr. Adams died in Danville, Mo., during the-summer of 1876, in his 82d year. He had eight children William B., B. T., J. B., James B., Susan F., John A., C. C., and Sarah E. William B. is a physician, lives in Danville, and has a practice that extends for many miles over that portion of the country. He is a very intelligent man, and exercises a large influence in the affairs of the County, which he has represented in the State Legislature. He possesses a large fund of ready wit and humor, and is an entertaining...

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Biographical Sketch of Nathaniel Maughs

Nathaniel Maughs was of Loudon County, Va. His children were David, William, John, Moses, Elijah, Stephen, Vinson, Mary, Sally, and Eli. Mr. Maughs removed from Virginia to Fleming County, Ky., and his children all came with him. David and William were Baptist preachers, and the former settled in Lincoln County, Mo. Elijah married .Mary Smith, by whom he had-Mordecai M., Milton M., Sophronia F., Lucinda S., Elijah C., Daniel M., and Mary S. V. Mr. Maughs died, and his widow married his brother Stephen, who settled in Montgomery County, Mo., in 1822. They had Jerry S. D. S., and George M. B. Mordecai Maughs, who was a physician, was married first to the widow Jane Scott; second to Dorothea Stephenson, and third to Lizzie Offutt. He had sixteen children in all. The Doctor was an educated, intelligent man, full of wit and humor, and very fond of practical jokes. He lived at Danville for many years, but finally removed to Callaway County, where he died. Sophronia Maughs married Dr. William Proctor, of St. Louis. Mary V. S. was married first to Henry Davault, and second to Willis Loyd, both old settlers of Montgomery County. Jerry died a bachelor in Montgomery County. George M. B., son of Stephen Maughs, is a physician. He married Anna Anderson, of Callaway County, and settled in St. Louis, where he has become distinguished in...

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Biographical Sketch of Ezekiel McCarty

Ezekiel and Ira McCarty were sons of James McCarty and Jane Harding, of Virginia. They settled in Clark County, Kentucky, in 1806, where they lived and died. They had twelve sisters, all of whom married and settled in Kentucky. Ezekiel was a soldier of the war of 1812, and was in the battle known as Dudley’s Defeat. He married Elizabeth Sidebottom of Kentucky. Their children were Shelton A., Eli, James, Sally, George W., John W., Joseph K., and Alfred S. Mr. McCarty removed to Missouri and settled in Danville in 1836. He died in 1866, and his wife in 1873. Eli, George W., and Alfred are the only surviving children. George W. is a Justice of the Peace and a prominent citizen. Ira McCarty, brother of Ezekiel, married a Miss Moore, of Kentucky, and settled in Boone County, Mo., where he raised a family of seven...

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Biographical Sketch of Lawson Drury

Lawson Drury was a native of Worcester Co., Mass., but removed to New Hampshire, where he married Elizabeth Johnson. Their children were Lawson, Jr., Charles, and Ruth. His first wife died, and he was married the second time. His children by his second wife were George, John, James, and Sarah. Mr. Drury removed from New Hampshire to Ohio, where he became Judge of the County Court for the County in which he lived. After the death of his second wife he came to Missouri and lived with his son Charles, at Danville, where he died in July, 1835, in his 65th year. Charles Drury came to Missouri at a very early date, and was the second merchant in Montgomery County, Daniel Robinson being the first. Drury’s first store was at Loutre Lick, but in 1834 he removed to Danville. He was an honest, enterprising man, and was highly esteemed by all who knew him. He married Sally A. Wiseman, of Boone County, who was a daughter of James Wiseman and Mary Tuttle. Their children were-Lawson, James H., Susan B., Charles J., Jarrett, Joseph, Andrew M., Richard B., Nary E., and Elizabeth. Mr. Drury died in Danville in 1848, in his 47th year. Five of his children, James H., Jarrett, Joseph, Andrew H., and Elizabeth, died unmarried. Lawson was married twice; first to Margaret Frazier, and second to Catharine Nilson....

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Biographical Sketch of John Wright

John Wright, of England, came to America and settled in Pittsylvania County, Va. He had four children John, William, Nancy, and another daughter. William married Isabella Thrailkill, of Virginia, and settled in Clark County, Ky. He served five years in the revolutionary war. He had twelve children, ten of whom lived to be grown, and were married. His first son, William, married Nancy Oliver, of Kentucky, and they had eleven children Harvey S., James T., William, Stephen, Isaac W., Elizabeth, Susan, Nancy, Emeline, Louisa, and Lucinda. Mr. Wright settled in Montgomery County, Mo., in 1824, on a place adjoining the present town of Danville, where he lived and kept tavern for many years. A Methodist minister named Prescott, stopped at his house one day to get his dinner, and there being no men present he went to the barn to feed his horse. While looking around for the food he saw some large flat gourds, which he supposed to be pumpkins, and fed a lot of them to his horse. After that he was called Gourd Head Prescott. In 1833 Mr. Wright sold his place to Rev. Andrew Monroe, a well known pioneer Methodist preacher, who lived there and kept tavern for some time. Isabella Wright, sister of William Wright, Sr., married John Stone, who settled in Montgomery County in 1818, but afterward removed to...

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Biographical Sketch of Major Thomas Hughes

Major Thomas Hughes, of Bourbon County, Kentucky, married Lucy Tandy, and their children were William, Gabriel, Thomas, Henry C., Elliott M., James and Susan T. The Major’s first wife died, and he subsequently married her sister, who was a widow at the time. Major Hughes held the position of Justice of the Peace, in Paris, for forty years, and all his decisions were sustained by the higher courts. He also represented Bourbon County in the Kentucky Legislature. His eldest son, William, married his cousin, Margaret Hughes, and settled in Boone County, Missouri. Elliott M. received a classical education, and came to Missouri when a young man, and taught school in and near Danville for several years. He then returned to Kentucky, where he married Jane S. McConnell, and soon after came back to Montgomery County, where he remained until his death, which occurred on the 14th of January, 1862. He exercised a large influence in his community, and was a general favorite with all who knew him. He was fond of practical jokes was full of wit and humor, and became a prominent member of the Evanix Society of Danville. The names of his children living in 1876, are Blanche A., Duncan C., Susan C., Elliott M., Jr., R. H., Arnold, and Tandy. Elliott M., Jr., is Prosecuting Attorney of Montgomery County, and is a rising young lawyer, with...

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Biography of Victor Craig

Victor Craig, of England, came to America in 1760, and settled in Maryland. He had four sons, William, James, Robert, and Samuel. William and James lived in Albemarle County Va. Samuel was drowned in the Susquehanna River. Robert was a soldier of the revolutionary war. He was married first to Susan Carter, of Virginia, who was afterward killed by the Indians. She lived nine days after having been scalped. Mr. Craig was married the second time to Sarah Ellington, of New Jersey, by whom he had-John, David, Victor, Jonathan, Jacob, Cynthia, Nancy, and Sally. Mr. Craig settled in Montgomery County in 1829, and died the following year. His eldest son, John, married Nancy Cobb, and settled in Montgomery County in 1826. He was a blacksmith by trade, and the first one at Danville. In 1831 he built the Dryden horse-mill, on the Booneslick road, below Danville. The mill was run by a cog wheel, and it required three or four hours to grind a bushel of grain. The hermit, Baughman, whose history is given elsewhere, carried the stones of this mill to his cave, many years after the mill ceased running, and arranged them so he could do his own grinding, by hand. He still uses the same stones. Col. David Craig, brother of John, settled in Montgomery County in 1817, and is still living, in his 87th year....

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Biography of Dr. Thomas Jefferson Bailey

Dr. Bailey was a native of Kentucky, born in Lincoln county, January 17, 1803, whith his father, John Bailey, had removed with his family from Virginia. There the father died, and Thomas J. grew up to manhood. He read medicine at Danville under the able¬†preceptor ship¬†of Drs. Smith and McDowell, till he was prepared for practice. Prior to removing to Missouri, in 1828, he married Miss Harriet Sproul, a native of the same county as himself. He settled first in Ralls county, this State, where he practiced medicine till 1837, removing thence to Springfield, when that town was a mere hamlet. Both himself and wife were well pleased, and, resolving to stay, located on a forty-acre tract between the two cities of Springfield. Here he began a most successful professional career, and for nearly a quarter of a century ministered to the sick in his plain, simple way that built him the large practice out of which he realized a fortune. His sympathetic disposition and moderate charges made him beloved of all, no one ever complaining of excessive bills. His plain style won confidence, and he was never a man to judge others by dress or outward appearance; but always looked within to find the man. He thoroughly believed that ” ‘Twas not in rank or wealth or state, but ‘get up and get’ that makes men great.” Dr....

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