Location: Danbury Connecticut

Establishment of Fort Smith in 1817

The white population in Arkansas in 1817 had increased to several thousand, whose protection, as well as that of the Cherokee people living in that territory, from the continued hostilities of the Osage, required the establishment of a military post at the western border dividing the white settlements from the Osage. From Saint Louis came further news of threatened hostilities by the Osage near Clermont’s Town, and a report 1Niles Register, (Baltimore) vol. xiii, 176. that Major William Bradford with a detachment of United States riflemen, and accompanied by Major Long, topographical engineer, had left that city for the...

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Biographical Sketch of Warren Sherman Hayden

Hayden, Warren Sherman; investment banker; born, Danbury, Ct., Oct. 20, 1870; son of Warren L. and Anna Flower Sherman Hayden; his father was born in Ohio and mother in Vermont; educated, Hiram College, 1892, Ph. B.; married, Hiram; O., 1893, Blanche R. Squire : one daughter, Margaret Hayden; second marriage, Cleveland, 1906, Elizabeth Strong; one son, Sherman Strong Hayden, and one daughter, Eleanor Hayden; pres. Cleveland Council of Sociology, 1909-1910; vice pres. Cleveland Chamber of Commerce, 1912; vice pres. Investment Bankers Ass’n of America, 1912; pres. Cleveland Chamber of Commerce, 1913; representative Lamprecht Bros. & Co., 1892-1895; manager Bond Department of same company, 1895-1903; member of Hay-den, Miller & Co., since 1903; director Union National Bank, Aurora, Elgin & Chicago R. R. Co., Springfield & Xenia R. R. Co., Goshen Coal Co., Miami Paper Co., Boston-Virginia Transportation Co.; trustee Hiram College; member Chamber of Commerce, Ohio State Board of Commerce, Ohio Archaeological Historical Society, Western Reserve Historical Society, New England Society of Cleveland; member Union, University, and Nisi Prins Clubs; was admitted to the bar as attorney-of-law in 1898; has never...

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Oliver Augustus Garrett Todd of Danbury CT

Oliver Augustus Garrett Todd7, (Oliver6, Samuel5, Christopher4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christophe1) born Oct. 1, 1812, married first, June 26, 1834, Mary Ann Pierpont, who was born Aug. 23, 1815, died March 27, 1865. He married second, Oct. 8, 1868, Josephine Gray Sturgiss, of Wilton, Conn., who was born April 3, 1840. He was a lawyer and at one time was the Judge of Probate. They lived in Danbury, Conn. Children by Mary Ann Pierpont: 1375. Miranda Louisa, b. June 7, 1835. 1376. Henry Augustus, b. March 8, 1837. 1377. Marion Braidfoot, b. Dec. 3, 1838. 1378. Frances Adelaide, b. Sept. 23, 1840, m. James Norton, of New York City. 1379. Katherine Pierpont, b. Nov. 12, 1842, d. young. 1380. Caroline Elizabeth, b. Sept. 3, 1844, d. young. 1381. Hiram Wallace, b. March 12, 1846, d. young. 1382. Alfred Pierpont, b. April 12, 1852. Children by Josephine Gray Sturgiss: 1383. Samuel Sturgiss, b. Dec. 17, 1869. 1384. Josephine Gray, b. March 18,...

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Western Niantic Tribe

Western Niantic Indians. An Algonquian tribe formerly occupying the coast of Connecticut from Niantic bay to the Connecticut river. De Forest concluded that they once formed one tribe with the Rhode Island Niantic, which was cut in two by the Pequot invasion. Their principal village, also called Niantic, was near the present town of that name. They were subject to the Pequot, and had no political connection with the eastern Niantic. They were nearly destroyed in the Pequot war of 1637, and at its close the survivors were placed under the rule of the Mohegan. They numbered about 100 in 1638, and about 85 in 1761. Many joined the Brotherton Indians in New York about 1788, and none now exist under their own name. Kendall 1Kendall, Tray., 1809 states that they had a small village near Danbury in 1809, but these were probably a remnant of the western Connecticut tribes, not Niantic. According to Speck 2Speck, inf’n, 1907 several mixed Niantic Mohegan live at Mohegan, Connecticut, the descendants of a pure Niantic woman from the mouth of Niantic river. Their voices are commonly said to have been high-pitched in comparison with those of their neighbors. Footnotes:   [ + ] 1. ↩ Kendall, Tray., 1809 2. ↩ Speck, inf’n,...

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