Location: Cumberland County ME

Biographical Sketch of Allen, William

Allen, William, son of William Allen, was born at Brunswick, Cumberland County, Maine, March 31, 1822. He is a grandson of the Rev. Thomas Allen, the “fighting parson” of the noted Berkshire militia, who performed such conspicuous service under General Stark of Revolutionary fame. His father was a clergyman of Pittsfield, a scholar of eminence, and at one time president of Bowdoin College. After obtaining his preliminary education at the public schools, Mr. Allen fitted for college at Phillips Academy, Andover, and at the North Yarmouth Academy, in Maine, and entered Bowdoin College in 1834. After a few months spent at Bowdoin he went to Amherst, where he graduated in 1842. He began the study of law at the Yale law school, continuing it later at Northampton, where he was admitted to the bar in 1845, and where he has since resided. In 1880 Mr. Allen was made associate justice of the superior court, which high office he now holds, abundantly justifying the judicious selection of Governor Long, to whom he was indebted for the...

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Biographical Sketch of Allen, Stillman Boyd

Allen, Stillman Boyd, son of Horace O. and Elizabeth Allen, was born September 8, 1830, at Waterborough, New county, Maine. He received his education in the academies at North Yarmouth, Kennebunk and Alfred, Maine. In September 1853, he was admitted to the bar, and practiced law in Maine until May, 1861, when he removed to Boston, and two years later became associated with the Hon. John D. Long, who subsequently retired from the firm upon his election as governor of the State. He is now the senior member of the law fir of Allen, Long & Hemenway (Governor Long since his retirement from congressional life having resumed his former relations). Mr. Allen has been largely engaged in jury trials, and has the reputation of winning for his clients the largest verdicts against railroads and other corporations ever rendered in this country. Mr. Allen was married at Kittery, Maine, September 7, 1854, to Harriet S., daughter of Joseph and Mary Seaward. Their children are: Willis Boyd Allen, who was a partner in his father’s firm for six years and has since been engaged in literary pursuits, and Marion Boyd Allen. In 1876-’77 Mr. Allen represented the city of Boston in the House of Representatives, serving the first year upon the judiciary committee. The following year he was chairman of the committee on probate and chancery. In 1877 he conducted an...

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Biographical Sketch of Allen, Horace G.

Allen, Horace G., son of Stephen M. Allen, was born at Jamaica Plain (Boston), July 27, 1855. His preparatory studies were pursued in the common schools. He was graduated L.L.B. from the Harvard law school in 1876; then became associated with Nathan Morse, Boston. He was admitted to the Suffolk bar in 1877. Later, he became law partner with Mr. Morse, under the firm name of Morse & Allen, with whom he still remains in practice of the law. Mr. Allen was married in Brunswick, Me, April 28, 1881, to Grace D., daughter of Gen. Joshua L. Chamberlain. Mr. Allen is a member of the Boston Art Club, Boston Athletic Association, and Curtis Club. In 1888 and ’89 he was elected a member of the Boston common council, and in the latter year, after a protracted contest, was chosen president of that body, January 11th. In this responsible position he has displayed marked ability, and has already acquired a reputation for tact and fairness greatly to his credit. His residence is in...

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Biographical Sketch of Alden, Edmund Kimball

Alden, Edmund Kimball, son of Dr. Ebenezer and Anne (Kimball) Alden, was born in Randolph, Norfolk County, April 11, 1825. He is a lineal descendant in the eighth generation, by two family lines. Of “John” and “Priscilla” of Mayflower fame. After attending the Randolph Academy, he entered Amherst College, where he graduated in 1844; was then a teacher in the Williston Seminary, at Easthampton, for a year, and graduated from the Andover Theological Seminary in 1848, continuing his studies there for a few months as Abbott resident. From 1850 to 1854 Mr. Alden was pastor of the First Church of Yarmouth, Maine; was pastor of the Congregational church at Lenox, from 1854 to 1859; and then became pastor of Phillips Church, Boston, so continuing till 1876. He received from his alma mater, in 1866, the honorary degree of D. D. Mr. Alden was married April 25, 1850, to Maria, daughter of Deacon Gershom and Sarah (Hyde) Hyde, of Bath, Me. He was a trustee for fourteen years of Phillips Academy and the Andover Theological Seminary, resigning this trust in 1881; he has also been a trustee of Amherst College since 1873; he is at present corresponding secretary, home department, of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, having held the office for thirteen...

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel N. Hawkes

Assistant attorney-general of Kansas with a residence at Topeka, Samuel N. Hawkes is one of the older members of the Kansas bar, and had been in active practice in various parts of the state for more than thirty years. He came to Kansas with a training and education received at one of the oldest eastern universities, and his career had been one of uninterrupted success and influential participation in the life of his own community and the state. He was born at Portland, Maine, May 8, 1861, a son of Charles M. and Susan A. (Whitney) Hawkes. His father, who was a wholesale shipper at Portland, up to 1870 and afterwards in the brokerage business there until 1875, moved his family in the latter year to New Haven, Connecticut, in order to educate his children. New Haven was his home the rest of his life. Reared in Portland, Maine, and New Haven, Connecticut, Samuel N. Hawkes followed his course in the common schools with preparatory work at Hopkins Grammar School in New Haven, and in 1879 was matrioulated in Yale University. He graduated B. A. in 1883, and two years later received his law degree LL. B. from the same university. Shortly after his graduation he came to Kansas, and practiced at Topeka and Lincoln Center until 1887, when he established his home at Stockton. Mr. Hawkes still maintains...

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Biography of William E. Leighton, M.D.

Dr. William E. Leighton, who is devoting his time to the practice of surgery in St. Louis, was born in Portland, Maine, May 9, 1892, a son of the late George W. Leighton, who was a descendant of an old Massachusetts family which was founded in Cohasset in the early part of the seventeenth century by one of the name who came from England. One of the ancestral lines is traced back to the Packard family of Boston. Later descendants participated in the Revolutionary war. George W. Leighton, the Doctor’s father, was in the granite business and during the Civil war was employed by the government in the lighthouse department on construction work. At one time he served as alderman of Portland and at all times was a stanch supporter of republican principles. He was also a thirty-second degree Mason and ever loyally followed the teachings and purposes of the craft. He married Alexina Drinkwater, a native of Maine, whose family originally came from Aberdeen, Scotland, the ancestral line being traced back to the early part of the sixteenth century. One of the name was knighted by an English king. To Mr. and Mrs. George W. Leighton were born four children, three daughters and a son, the latter being second in order of birth. The father departed this life in 1900, at the age of sixty years. The mother...

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Biography of E. R. Rogers

E.R. ROGERS. – The subject of this brief sketch is a son of Charles and Jane P. Rogers, and was born in Freeport, Maine, November 29, 1829. He there received a common-school education, and early took to the sea, “a life on the ocean wave” being the bent of his inclinations. He at the early age of fourteen shipped in Boston for New Orleans and Europe. he continued in that calling until he arrived in San Francisco, on October 10, 1849, in the bark Sarah Warren, a vessel subsequently well known on Puget Sound as one of its early lumber vessels. On arriving in San Francisco, he met his uncle, Captain Denison, who was master of a vessel homeward bound, and who not only offered him, but urged him to accept the position of first officer on his vessel; but he declined, and in June following was at Big Auburn Gulch, Placer County, mining for gold. A few days afterwards he was taken ill with brain and bilious fever, the first and only sickness since his childhood. Want of medical attendance and care protracted his illness until the following February. He then prospected for a season, and met with but very indifferent success. Later in the season he joined a company to the American River at Haniseeket bar; but the season proved short; and, the freshet coming on before...

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Biography of Edmund Needham Morrill, Hon.

Hon. Edmund Needham Morrill. Of the record of Governor Morrill during his term as head of the state government of Kansas a review is given on other pages of this history. It will be wise to supplement that record with some of the more personal details of his career and his various connections, public and business and philanthropic, with Brown County, where his name will always be revered and where he was regarded by common consent as the foremost citizen. He was born at Westbrook, Cumberland County, Maine, February 12, 1834, and died in 1909, after completing three-quarters of a century of life. He was educated in the common schools and in Westbrook Seminary. His father, Rufus Morrill, was a tanner and currier by trade. The son learned the same business. In 1856 Edmund Morrill, then twenty-two years of age, was elected a member of the board of school supervisors for his native town. At the end of one year he resigned office to come to Kansas. While he was a member of the board he was instrumental in granting a teacher’s certificate to Thomas B. Reed, who afterwards became nationally distinguished as speaker of the House of Representatives. In 1857 Mr. Morrill joined a colony which left Maine to found a new settlement in the territory of Kansas. They came to Brown County and located a few miles...

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Biography of John W. Daniels

The public-school system of Boise is a monument to the character and labors of Professor John W. Daniels. There is no nobler profession to which man may devote his energies than that of the teacher. What man prominent in public life does not attribute his success in a considerable measure to the influence of some teacher whose instruction he enjoyed in youth? The thoughts implanted in the young minds grow and develop, and largely shape the destinies of those by whom they have been received. It is therefore of the utmost importance that the training of the young shall be entrusted to those who have a just appreciation of the responsibilities that rest upon them, who realize the value of physical, mental and moral development, who can instruct the children how best to use their powers, and, while promoting intellectual activity, neglect not to sow the seeds of character that will produce high ideals of manhood and womanhood. Such is the mission of the teacher, and such has been the life work of John W. Daniels. Professor Daniels was born in England, on the 1st of January, 1846, and when five years of age was brought to America by his parents, Thomas and Margaret (Sullivan) Daniels, who crossed the Atlantic with their five children, and located near Boston, Massachusetts. The father had learned the dyer’s trade in England and...

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Biographical Sketch of Seth Eastman

Seth Eastman, born in Brunswick, Maine, January 24, 1808; died in Washington, D. C., August 31, 1875. Was appointed to the Military Academy, West Point, at the age of 16, and was graduated June, 1829. Served at Fort Crawford and Fort Snelling, where he had ample opportunities for studying the Indians who frequented the posts. In November, 1831, he was detailed for duty at the Academy and retired from active service December, 1863. From 1850 to 1855 he was engaged in the preparation of the illustrations used in the work mentioned above, evidently under the supervision of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. View Dakotah Village, Dakotah...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles Frederick Mabery

Mabery, Charles Frederick; chemist; born North Gorham, Me., Jan. 13, 1850; son of Henry and Elizabeth A. Bennett Mabery; S. B., Lawrence Scientific School, (Harvard), 1876, Sc. D., 1881; married, Miss F. A. Plaisted, of Gorham, Me., Nov. 19, 1872; asst. in chemistry, Harvard, 1874-1883; prof. chemistry, Case School of Applied Science, 1883-1911, since prof. emeritus; researcher in organic chemistry, especially in investigations of the composition of American petroleum, lubricants and lubrication; Fellow American Academy Arts and Sciences, A. A. A. S.; member American Philosophical Society, American Chemical...

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Biography of C. B. Mitchell

Although one of the more recent additions to the Miami bar, Charles B. Mitchell has already demonstrated his ability to cope with the intricacies of the law and is building up a good practice. He is also well known as a writer of ability and has contributed many interesting articles to leading magazines. He was born at Brunswick, Maine, on the 9th of October, 1870, his parents being George E. and Agnes E. Mitchell, also natives of the Pine Tree state, the former born at Brunswick, August 3, 1850, while the birth of the latter occurred at Oldtown in 1854. The father was employed in various shoe factories in Maine and is now living at Lewiston; that state, but the mother passed away in 1890. C. B. Mitchell was accorded limited educational opportunities, attending the public schools of his native city to the age of eighteen years, and working part time in a shoe factory from the age of twelve years. For a time after leaving school he was a reporter on the Lewiston (Me.) Gazette and then read law in the office of Hon. J. W. Mitchell at Auburn, that state, being admitted to practice in 1892. Three years later he became private secretary to James F. McElroy, of Albany, New York, a construction engineer with a national reputation in 1899 he entered Princeton (N. J.) Theological Seminary...

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Biography of Ansel B. Hackett

Ansel B. Hackett. The nation was celebrating the sixtieth anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence when Ansel B. Hackett was born July 4, 1836. His birth occurred at Minot, Cumberland County, Maine. It was in that picturesque district of the Pine Tree State that he spent his early years. Mr. Hackett, who with his venerable wife, now resided at Carbondale, is one of the true pioneers of Kansas, as is also Mrs. Hackett. Both came here when Kansas was a territory, and they experienced the dangers and hardships of frontier life. It is a matter of special interest that Mrs. Hackett is one of the very few surviving witnesses of the Quantrall raid on Lawrence, in which city she was living at the time. Mr. Hackett had now passed the age of four-score, and nearly sixty of those years have been spent in the State of Kansas. He is one of the honored survivors of the Civil war. His grandfather Hackett came from Ireland and his grandmother from Scotland, and the Hacketts became identified with America during colonial days. His parents were Barnabas and Abbey Hackett, who had a family of ten children, named: Lucas, Abbey, Ruby, Sarah, Maria, Hattie, Nathan, Daniel, Ansel and Elmer. Ansel and his brother Elmer are the only ones now living. It was on September 20, 1857, when Ansel B. Hackett...

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The name of the territory about Casco Bay and Presumpscot River, in the area now included in Cumberland County, Maine. It was also sometimes applied to those Abnaki Indians by whom it was occupied. Since the section was settled at an early date by the whites, the name soon dropped out of use as applied to the Indians, or rather it was changed to “Casco,” but this was a mere local designation, not a tribal distinction, as the Indians referred to were Abnaki. The proper form of the word is given by Willis as Uh-kos-is-co, ‘crane’ or ‘heron,’ the first syllable being guttural. These birds still frequent the bay. It is said by Willis to have been the Indian name of Falmouth (Portland),...

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Biographical Sketch of William Toby Noyes

William Toby Noyes was born August 22, 1836, in Durham, Cumberland County, Maine. His parents, John Henry and Sarah Webb (Toby) Noyes, were natives respectively of England and Wales. His father was a politician, and was elected as the first clerk of Pawnel, and was a profound student and a strong advocate of the temperance cause. He died at the residence of his son William, in California, in 1880, at the age of seventy-six. Mr. Noyes came to California by water in 1863, and landed in San Francisco in May of that year. He had previously (in 1861) made a trip to Cuba, where be worked at the carpenter’s trade for one year. He also spent some time building, etc., in Virginia City, and in 1865 went back to San Francisco and worked for the Government for one year. Then he went to East Oakland, where he engaged in building and contracting for fourteen years. From there he went to Tucson, Arizona, and contracted for about one year. From the latter place he moved to San Bernardino County, and bought 120 acres of land in Highlands, in partnership with William H. Randall, and has given his attention to fruit and vine culture ever since. He was married in March 1861, to Miss Harriet Randall, of Pawnel, Maine, and they have one child, a daughter Miss Jennie. Mr. Noyes’ influence...

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