Location: Culpeper County VA

Biography of J.L. Colvert

J. L. Colvert, retired merchant, was born in 1828 in Culpeper County, Va., the son of William I. and Harriett (Weedon) Colvert. The father, born in the same county in 1791, was a farmer and a soldier in the war of 1812, on duty in his native State. In 1828 he came to Warren County, Tenn., Thence to Alabama for a few years, and about 1840 returned to Cannon County, Tenn. He finally settled in Dekalb County in 1848 and bought a home of 150 acres, where he lived the greater part of his life. He died in Nashville in 1859. The mother, born in 1801 in Fairfax County, Va., is still living, receiving a pension for her husband’s services in 1812. Our subject, one of seven children, came to Tennessee when an infant, and was reared and educated in Cannon County. At the age of sixteen he served a year’s apprenticeship in a tannery, then farmed a year, and in 1848 sunk a tannery in Dekalb County with his brother as partner. In April 1846, he Married Johanna Matthews, born in Cannon County in 1830. Their two children are Mary E., wife of S. D. Blankenship, and Harriett. In 1852 he engaged in farming and merchandising besides tanning. In 1854 he sold his tan yard and store and established a store in Smith County. After six months here...

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Manahoac Indians

Manahoac Tribe: Meaning “They are very merry,” according to Tooker (1895), but this seems improbable. Also called: Mahocks, apparently a shortened form. Manahoac Connections. The Manaboac belonged to the Siouan linguistic family; their nearest connections were probably the Monacan, Moneton, and Tutelo. Manahoac Location. In northern Virginia between the falls of the rivers and the mountains east and west and the Potomac and North Anna Rivers north and south. Manahoac Subdivisions. Subtribes or tribes of the confederacy as far as known were the following: Hassinunga, on the headwaters of the Rappahannock River. Manahoac proper, according to Jefferson (1801), in Stafford and Spottsylvania Counties. Ontponea, in Orange County. Shackaconia, on the south bank of the Rappahannock River in Spottsylvania County. Stegaraki, on the Rapidan River in Orange County. Tanxnitania, on the north side of the upper Rappahannock River in Fauquier County. Tegninateo, in Culpeper County, at the head of the Rappahannock River. Whonkentia, in Fauquier County, near the head of the Rappahannock. Manahoac Villages: Mahaskahod, on the Rappahannock River, probably near Fredericksburg, is the only town known by name. Manahoac History. Traditional evidence points to an early home of the Manahoac people in the Ohio Valley. In 1608 John Smith discovered them in the location above given and learned that they with the Monacan but at war with the Powhatan Indians and the Iroquois (or perhaps rather the Susquehanna). After...

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Biography of P. A. Kemper, M. D.

P. A. Kemper, M. D., physician and surgeon, Mattoon; was born in Culpeper Co., Va., Aug. 31, 1832; his early education was under the direct supervision of his mother, who was a well-qualified schoolmistress; his father was an artisan by profession, of whom he was bereft at the early age of 8 years; when about 16 years of age, he left home and came to Paris, Edgar Co., Ill.; in the fall of 1855, he began the study of his profession with Dr. D. O. McCord, remaining in his office two and a half years; during the winter of 1857 and 1858, he attended Rush Medical College, and, at a later date, received his degree; He began the practice of his profession in Pleasant Grove Tp., Coles Co., March 3, 1858; here he remained until 1876, excepting an absence of two years in the army. In 1861, he raised a company for the 5th Regiment, and was chosen Captain of the same; his position he resigned for that of Assistant Surgeon of the regiment; when the final organization occurred, however, through the treachery of professed friends, he failed in receiving the appointment; notwithstanding the unjust treatment to himself and Col. Updegraff, the commanding officer, he elected to remain with his boys, as a private in the ranks, rather than return home; in June, 1862, he was captured at Pocahontas,...

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Biographical Sketch of James H. Williams

James H. Williams, farmer; P. O. Etna; is the son of William and Elizabeth Williams, of Culpeper Co., Va.; was born June 12, 1826, in Culpeper Co., Va.; moved with his folks to Coles Co., Paradise Tp., Ill., on Dec. 20, 1836; is the owner of 171 acres of land, valued at $4,500. Is Commissioner of Highways, and has been for seven years, also School Director for eight years, and is at the, present time. Never was married. His father, William Williams, was born in Culpeper Co., Va., Aug. 3, 1789, died Jan. 7, 1855, in the 67th year of his age; his mother (Elizabeth Williams) was born in Culpeper Co., the late war three years, in Company D., Va., April 22, 1792, died Nov. 30, 1873, 123d Volunteer Ill. in the 84th year of her...

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Biography of Fenton M. Slaughter

Fenton M. Slaughter is one of the well-known and prominent men of San Bernardino County. A brief review of his life is one of interest in the annals of Southern California. Mr. Slaughter was born January 10, 1826, a descendant from an old colonial family of Virginia, who emigrated from England in 1616. His father, Robin Lewis Slaughter, was born in Culpeper County, Virginia, April 25, 1779, the son of Robin and Ann Slaughter. October 25, 1803, he married Miss Elizabeth Gillem, a native of Rockbridge County, Virginia. He died in 1834, leaving a family of eleven children for his widow to care for. In 1835, when the subject of this sketch was nine years old, his mother moved the family to Missouri and located in Callaway County, and in 1842 settled in St. Louis. Previous to this date Mr. Slaughter had spent his time in agricultural pursuits, receiving at the same time such schooling as was afforded by the common schools. Upon the arrival of the family in St. Louis, he entered the shops of McMurray & Dorman, to learn the trade of mechanical engineer, and after serving an apprenticeship was employed as an engineer upon river steamers between St. Louis and New Orleans. Upon the first call for volunteers for the Mexican war in 1846, Mr. Slaughter abandoned his work and enlisted for a year’s service in...

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