Location: Cuba

Early Exploration and Native Americans

De Soto and his band gave to the Choctaws at Moma Binah and the Chickasaws at Chikasahha their first lesson in the white man’s modus operandi to civilize and Christianize North American Indians; so has the same lesson been continued to be given to that unfortunate people by his white successors from that day to this, all over this continent, but which to them, was as the tones of an alarm-bell at midnight. And one hundred and twenty-three years have passed since our forefathers declared all men of every nationality to be free and equal on the soil of the North American continent then under their jurisdiction, except the Africans whom they held in slavery, and the Native Americans against whom they decreed absolute extermination because they could not also enslave them; to prove which, they at once began to hold out flattering-inducements to the so-called oppressed people of all climes under the sun, to come to free America and assist them to oppress and kill off the Native Americans and in partnership take their lands and country, as this was more in accordance with their lust of wealth and speedy self-aggrandizement than the imagined slow process of educating, civilizing and Christianizing them, a work too con descending, too humiliating; and to demonstrate that it has been a grand and glorious success, we now point with vaunting pride and haughty...

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Narrative of the Captivity of John Ortiz – Indian Captivities

John Ortiz, a Spaniard, Who was Eleven Years a Prisoner Among the Indians of Florida In the year 1528 Pamphilo de Narvaez, with a commission, constituting him governor of Florida, or “all the lands lying from the river of Palms to the cape of Florida,” sailed for that country with 400 foot and 20 horse, in five ships. With this expedition went a Spaniard, named John Ortiz, a native of Seville, whose connections were among the nobility of Castile. Although we have no account of what part Ortiz acted in Narvaez‘s expedition, or how he escaped its disastrous issue,...

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Early Indian Wars in Florida

Previous to the permanent establishment of the English in North America, the French and Spaniards made many attempts to get possession of various parts of the country. The coasts were carefully explored, and colonies planted, but they were soon given up as expensive, and involving too much hardship and danger. The first expedition to the coast of Florida was made in 1512, by Juan Ponce de Leon, renowned for his courage and warlike abilities. Ponce de Leon, becoming governor of Porto Rico (Puerto Rico), and hearing from the Indians that there existed a beautiful and fertile country to the...

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Biographical Sketch of William Toby Noyes

William Toby Noyes was born August 22, 1836, in Durham, Cumberland County, Maine. His parents, John Henry and Sarah Webb (Toby) Noyes, were natives respectively of England and Wales. His father was a politician, and was elected as the first clerk of Pawnel, and was a profound student and a strong advocate of the temperance cause. He died at the residence of his son William, in California, in 1880, at the age of seventy-six. Mr. Noyes came to California by water in 1863, and landed in San Francisco in May of that year. He had previously (in 1861) made a trip to Cuba, where be worked at the carpenter’s trade for one year. He also spent some time building, etc., in Virginia City, and in 1865 went back to San Francisco and worked for the Government for one year. Then he went to East Oakland, where he engaged in building and contracting for fourteen years. From there he went to Tucson, Arizona, and contracted for about one year. From the latter place he moved to San Bernardino County, and bought 120 acres of land in Highlands, in partnership with William H. Randall, and has given his attention to fruit and vine culture ever since. He was married in March 1861, to Miss Harriet Randall, of Pawnel, Maine, and they have one child, a daughter Miss Jennie. Mr. Noyes’ influence...

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Arawak Tribe

Arawak Indians, Arawakan Colony. In addition to the many proofs of constant communication between the tribes of Florida and those of the West Indian Islands from the earliest period, it is definitely known that a colony of Indians from Cuba, in quest of the same mythic fountain of youth for which Ponce de Leon afterward searched, landed on the south west coast of Florida, within the territory of the Calusa, about the period of the discovery of America, and that they were held as prisoners by the chief of that tribe and formed into a settlement whose people kept their separate identity as late at least as 1570. This tradition of a wonderful spring or stream upon the mainland of Florida or on one of the adjacent Bahama Islands was common to all the tribes of the larger islands as far south as Puerto Rico, and it is probable that more than one party of islanders made a similar attempt. According to Brinton and other investigators the Indians of Cuba, as well as of the Bahamas and the larger islands, were of the great Arawakan stock, which extends in South America as far as south Brazil and Bolivia. For Further Study For the Cuban settlement in Florida see: Contact Between the Southern Indians and Mexico. Fontaneda, Memoir, Smith trans, 1854. Barcia, Ensayo, introd., 1723. Herrera, Hist. Gen., I,...

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Indians of Jamaica and Southern Coast of Cuba

In the month of May 1494, the island of Jamaica was first discovered by Columbus. The native inhabitants appeared to be of a very different character from the timid and gentle islanders with whom former intercourse had been held. A crowd of canoes, filled with savages gaudily adorned with plumes and paint, opposed the landing of the Spaniards. These were pacified by the Indian interpreters on board; but upon landing, the next day, the throng of natives on shore exhibited such decidedly hostile intentions, that it became necessary to intimidate them. A few discharges from the Spanish cross-bows sufficed...

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