Location: Creek County OK

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. George W. Durall

(See Ghigau) Franklin Wallace, son of Samuel and Eliza (Harlan) Craig born in Missouri, March 15, 1854. Married November 8, 1878 Catherine Fetrick, born January 13, 1854 in Shelby County, Missouri. He died February 23, 1894. They were the parents of Edna Earl Craig, born June 8, 1880, educated in Female Seminary. Married at Claremore August 5, 1897 George Wesbroford, son of Benoni S. and Anna Durall, born October 23, 1878. They are the parents of: Benoni Franklin, born June 3, 1898, married October 6, 1918 Georgia Ann Brown, has one daughter, Mary Joe Durall, born June 20, 1920; George Raymond born July 14, 1900 married October 4, 1918 Corna Cass and their daughter, Marjorie Ann was born October 13, 1920; Jack Leroy, born January 15, 1910; Harvey Robert, born September 11, 1915 and Edna Virginia Durall, born July 14, 1918. Benoni Franklin Durall enlisted and was at the officers training camp. Mr. and Mrs. Durall are members of the Methodist Church. He is a Mason and she is an Eastern Star. Mr. Durall is in the loan and insurance business at...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. J. G. Moore

(See Cordery and Daniel).—Stonewall Jackson Rogers, born March 21, 1867, married in July 1890 Mary Kelly, born June 30, 1870 in Tennessee. She died in February 1907, and he died Septem­ber 13, 1907. They were the parents of Frances Leeper, born in Cleveland, Tennessee, September 1, 1892, educated at Chelsea, Northeastern State Normal, and the University of Tennessee; married at Sapulpa, Oklahoma, November 4, 1916 Joseph Gar­land Moore; Robert Kelly, born January 26, 1895; Mary Louisa, graduate of Chelsea High School, 1919; Henry Curtis, born January 30, 1903, graduate of the Chelsea High School May 1921, and Rebecca Mc­Nally Rogers born June 19, 1904. Joseph Garland and Frances Leeper Moore are the parents of Eugenia Graeme, born August 4, 1918 and Joseph Garland Moore, born September 4,...

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Slave Narrative of Anthony Dawson

Person Interviewed: Anthony Dawson Location: 1008 E. Owen St., Tulsa, Oklahoma Age: 105 “Run nigger, run, De Patteroll git you! Run nigger, run, De Patteroll come! “Watch nigger, Watch- De Patteroll trick you! Watch nigger, watch, He got a big gun!” Dat one of the songs de slaves all knowed, and de children down on de “twenty acres” used to sing it when dey playing in de moonlight ’round de cabins in de quarters. Sometime I wonder iffen de white folks didn’t make dat song up so us niggers would keep in line. None of my old Master’s boys tried to git away ‘cepting two. and dey met up wid evil, both of ’em. One of dem niggers was fotching a bull-tongue from a piece of new ground way at de back of de plantation, and bringing it to my pappy to git it sharped. My pappy was de blacksmith. Dis boy got out in de big road to walk in de soft send, and long come a wagon wid a white overseer and five, six, niggers going somewhar, Dey stopped and told dat boy to git in and ride. Dat was de last anybody seem him. Dat overseer and another one was cotched after awhile, and showed up to be underground railroaders. Dey would take a bunch of niggers into town for some excuse, and on de way...

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Slave Narrative of Andrew Simms

Person Interviewed: Andrew Simms Location: Sapulpa, Oklahoma Age: 80 My parents come over on a slave ship from Africa about twenty year before I was born on the William Driver plantation down in Florida. My folks didn’t know each other in Africa but my old Mammy told me she was captured by Negro slave hunters over there and brought to some coast town where the white buyers took her and carried her to America. She was kinder a young gal then and was sold to some white folks when the boat landed here. Dunno who they was. The same thing happen to my pappy. Must have been about the same time from the way they tells it. Maybe they was on the boat, I dunno. They was traded around and then mammy was sold to William Driver. The plantation was down in Florida. Another white folks had a plentation close by. Mister Simms was the owner. Bill Simms, that’s the name pappy kept after the war. Somehow or other mammy and pappy meets ’round the place and the first thing happens they is in love. That’s what mammy say. And the next thing happen is me. They didn’t get married. The Master’s say it is alright for them to have a baby. They never gets married, even after the war. Just jumped the broomstick and goes to living with...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. William J. Schuth

(See Ghigau) Eva Stella, daughter of Franklin Wallace and Catherine (Fetrick) Craig was born January 7, 1883 and educated at Welch. Married at Welch March 28, 1900 William J. son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Schuth. They are the parents of: Walter J., born July 1, 1903; William Craig, born September 6, 1910. Elzy Ivan, born June 16, 1917 and Gyneth Wayne Schuth, born July 24, 1920. Mr. and Mrs. Schuth are members of the Christian Church. He is a state highway supervisor. She is a Rebecca and during the war, was President of the Pleasant Valley Red Cross Association at...

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Slave Narrative of Andrew Simms

Person Interviewed: Andrew Simms Location: Sapulpa, Oklahoma Age: 80 My parents come over on a slave ship from Africa about twenty year before I was born on the William Driver plantation down in Florida. My folks didn’t know each other in Africa but my old Mammy told me she was captured by Negro slave hunters over there and brought to some coast town where the white buyers took her and carried her to America. She was kinder a young gal then and was sold to some white folks when the boat landed here. Dunno who they was. The same thing happen to my pappy. Must have been about the same time from the way they tells it. Maybe they was on the same boat, I dunno. They was traded around and then mammy was sold to William Driver. The plantation was down in Florida. Another white folks had a plantation close by. Mister Simms was the owner. Bill Simms – that’s the name pappy kept after the War. Somehow or other mammy and pappy meets ’round the place and the first thing happens they is in love. That’s what mammy say. And the next thing happen is me. They didn’t get married. The Master’s say it is alright for them to have a baby. They never gets married, even after the War. Just jumped the broomstick and goes to...

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Biographical Sketch of William E. Stich

William E. Stich. The largest general insurance office in Independence is owned and managed by William E. Stich. Mr. Stich is a brother of the late A. C. Stich, whose career as a business man and eitizen of Montgomery County had been described on other pages, where many of the detalls of the family history will be found. William E. Stich was born in Hanover, Germany, February 16, 1850. His parents came to this country in 1857 and located at Kalamazoo, Michigan. His early education was received in the schools there, and in the meantime he learned to be a cabinet maker under his father, who was a master of that trade. At the age of seventeen, on leaving school, he began working in an organ factory, and remained there about six years. He then became connected with the musical merchandise house of R. D. Bulloch of Jackson, Michigan, and was manager of their store at Saginaw for nine years. In 1883 Mr. Stich came to Kansas and bought his brother’s interest in a store at Paola. This was a general merchandise store and as its proprietor he conducted it for twenty-one years. Then in 1904 he moved to Ottawa, Kansas, and for a year was in the ice business. After a year’s intermission, he came to Independence in 1906, and had since been in the insurance business. His...

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Biography of John Rose

John Rose, who for several years had been numbered among the leading oil producers in Montgomery County fields, and resided at Independence, is a thoroughly practical as well as successful man, as his career indicates. When only thirteen he started out for himself, and had since hewed his way through difficulties, through poverty, to a successful position in the world. He was born February 26, 1861, near Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and is of Scotch parentage. His father, James Rose, was born in Scotland in 1822, was reared and learned the trade of stone mason in his native country, and about 1860 emigrated to Canada. In 1862 he moved his family to Ottawa County, Michigan, and became one of the early farmers there. At that time there were only five white families in the entire township where he settled. He spent the rest of his days actively engaged in farming and died in Ottawa County, Michigan, in 1876. After coming to the United States he was a republican voter, was a member of the Congregational Church and a man of very excellent character. He married Jane Daveney, who was boxn in Scotland in 1832, and who died in Michigan in 1890. They had a large family of children, John Rose being the eighth and youngest. Mention of the others is as follows: William, a farmer at Big Rapids, Michigan; Agnes;...

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Biography of Robert I. Allen, M. D.

One of the best known surgeons in northeastern Oklahoma is Dr. Robert I. Allen, who was born at Coodys Bluff on the 9th of September, 1877, a son of Dr. R. M. and Mary (Journeycake) Allen. His father was a native of Illinois, in which state he resided until after the close of the Civil war. Upon the outbreak of that war he enlisted in the Federal army and became a member of the medical staff. He was a stretcher bearer at the battles of Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. Dr. R. M. Allen received his medical training at Rush Medical College of Chicago and was a graduate of that institution. He came to Nowata in 1868 and was the first practicing physician here. He was successfully identified with the profession until 1904, when his demise occurred in Nowata. In September, 1868, occurred the marriage of Dr. R. M. Allen to Mary Journeycake, whose uncle, Charlie Journeycake, was the noted chief of the Delaware. Mrs. Allen died January 16, 1922, and was buried beside her husband in Nowata county. In the acquirement of an education Robert I. Allen attended the Cherokee schools and later entered Bacone Indian University and Willie Halsell College at Vinita. Determining upon a medical career, he subsequently enrolled as a student in the Baines Medical College at St. Louis, Missouri, and graduating in 1899, began...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Joel Mayer

Well known at Oilton and in Creek county is Mrs. Joel Mayer, who was born in Ramona, Oklahoma, on the 6th of February, 1900. She is a daughter of Reuben Bartlett and Roxie Ann (Pierson) Tuner. The former was one of the well to do old settlers of Oklahoma, important in the tribal affairs of his people in the early days, and the family has long been represented in this section of the state. The daughter, Mrs. Mayer, pursued her education in St. Francis Convent at Nevada, Missouri, and then returned to her home in Oklahoma, having since been a resident of this city. She was a young woman of but nineteen years when on the 17th of February, 1920, at Sapulpa, Oklahoma, she became the wife of Joel Mayer. She bore the maiden name of Maudine Mae Tyner and by her marriage has become the mother of an interesting little son, Joel B. Mayer, Jr. Mrs. Mayer has always lived in Oklahoma save for the period of her attendance at school in Missouri, having a very wide and popular acquaintance...

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Biography of Roy L. Fruit

Roy L. Fruit, one of the progressive newspaper men of the state, is publisher and proprietor of the Sedan Times-Star, one of the oldest republican journals in the southeastern quarter of the state. The Times-Star inherits the history of half a dozen or more papers which have had their share in the newspaper history of Chautauqua County. The Chautauqua Journal was founded at Sedan in 1875 by H. B. Kelley and R. S. Turner. It was consolidated with the Sedan Times in 1885. The Cedarvale Times, founded in 1878, was removed to Sedan the same year and the name changed to the Chautauqua County Times with P. H. Albright editor and publisher. Another change of name occurred in 1901 after which it was the Sedan Times, with A. D. Dunn as publisher. As already stated it was consolidated in 1885 with the Chautauqua Journal under the name Sedan Times-Journal and with R. G. Ward editor and publisher. The Cedarvale Star was founded in 1884 by I. D. McKeehan and was consolidated with the Times-Journal at Sedan in 1894 and the name of the consolidated paper became the Weekly Times-Star. Adrian Reynolds and F. G. Kenesson were editors and publishers. Freeman’s Lance, founded in Pern in 1891 by W. A. Tanksley, was moved to Sedan in 1892, was known as the Sedan Lance, and A. S. Koonce was its editor...

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Biography of Charles W. Holder

Charles W. Holder, a well known and successful automobile dealer of Coweta, has the local agency for the Ford cars and tractors, in which connection he has built up a gratifying business. His birth occurred in Parkersburg, West Virginia, on the 24th of November, 1892, his parents being Walter W. and Virginia F. Holder, the former a native of Indiana, while the latter was born in West Virginia. Walter W. Holder came to the Indian Territory in 1888 and secured land three and a half miles from Stroud, where he devoted his attention to farming until 1899. In that year he embarked in the drug business and since 1901 has been proprietor of a drug store at Kellyville, Oklahoma. Charles W. Holder, whose name introduces this review, was born while his mother was on a visit in West Virginia but has spent practically his entire life in Oklahoma, being reared and educated at Kellyville and at Bristow, this state. After putting aside his textbooks he engaged in the hardware business at Braggs, Muskogee County, where he remained until the United States entered the World war, when he disposed of his interests in order to be ready for military duty when called. As his services were not required, however, he went to Boynton as manager for the firm of Crawford & Wineland, with whom he was associated for eighteen months....

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Biography of John Owen Bradshaw, M. D.

Dr. John Owen Bradshaw, a man of high professional attainments, has been identified with the medical fraternity of Welch since 1913, and although he engages in general practice he devotes the greater part of his attention to the treatment of diseases pertaining to the eye, ear, nose and throat, in which he has become recognized as an authority. A native of Missouri, he was born in Lebanon county on the 9th of January, 1875 and his parents were Silas R. and Mary (Bradshaw) Bradshaw, the former a native of Kentucky. The mother’s birth occurred in Lebanon County, Missouri, and although she bore the name of Bradshaw previous to her marriage, the two families were not related. In spite of the fact that he was a native of the south, Mr. Bradshaw defended the Union cause during the Civil war as captain of a company of Kentucky infantry, while his father served as a captain in the Confederate army. Silas R. Bradshaw was a successful farmer, also engaging in the raising of horses, mules, sheep and cattle, and through the capable management of his business affairs he won a substantial measure of success. For fifty years he made his home one of the most highly on his farm and as one of the most highly respected residents of his community. He was a stanch republican in his political views and...

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Brizendine, Marian – Obituary

La Grande 1919-2004 Marian L. Brizendine, 85, of La Grande died May 26 at a local care center. A memorial service in Boise will begin at 11 a.m. Friday at Summers Funeral Home. Mrs. Brizendine was born Jan. 26, 1919, to Archibald and Viola Jenkins in Bristow, Okla. On Sept. 3, 1938, she married David Brizendine in Ontario. The couple were divorced in 1972. She lived in La Grande from 1960 to 1969 and for the past four years and had worked for J.C. Penney in La Grande, Pendleton and Boise. She enjoyed traveling, softball and bridge and was considered a rebel. Her friends called her Nerd, Precious or Sterns. She was a member of the sorority Epsilon Sigma Alpha, the Order of Eastern Star Hope Chapter, a charter member and past president of the Emblem Club in Ontario, past president of the Boise Eagles Auxiliary, and past president of the Idaho State Eagles auxiliary. Survivors include children and their spouses, Cami and John Conners of Boise, Susan and Bob Schnell of La Grande, and Dan Brizendine of Los Angeles; eight grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; a brother, Billy Jenkins of Coarsegold, Calif., a sister, Jane Limbaugh of Chandler, Ariz., and other relatives. A brother and a sister died earlier. Memorials may be made to the Boise Eagles Humanitarian Fund or the Idaho Elks Rehabilitation Hospital, P.O. Box 1100, Boise 83701....

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